The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

ECB Willing to Expand Stimulus Amid Growth Worry

ECB President Mario Draghi indicated that the bank stands ready to expand its stimulus programs and projected slower-than-expected economic growth in the eurozone, as well as lower inflation rates.

Volkswagen CFO Nominated as Board Chairman

The largest shareholder of European’s biggest auto maker nominated the company’s finance chief to become the next chairman of the VW supervisory board.

Iran’s Ali Larijani Says Parliament Must Approve Nuclear Agreement

Iran’s parliament will have the final say on whether Tehran approves or rejects the landmark nuclear agreement, senior Iranian officials said, raising fresh uncertainty about its future.

Jobs Report Could Seal Deal on Rates

The August employment report could make or break the case for the Federal Reserve raising rates this month.

Photos of a Syrian boy whose body washed ashore on a Turkish beach horrified people around the world as Europe’s migrant crisis escalates.

Photos of a Syrian boy whose body washed ashore on a Turkish beach horrified people around the world as Europe’s migrant crisis escalates.

Image of Syrian Boy Echoes Around World

The 3-year-old was a Syrian Kurd whose relatives’ efforts to emigrate to Canada had been rebuffed, according to media and Kurdish activists. 505

Hungary’s Leader Says Migrant Crisis Is Germany’s Problem

Hundreds of migrants rushed trains at Hungary’s main station as Prime Minister Viktor Orban blamed Germany for Europe’s migration crisis and warned that border-free travel within the bloc is at risk. 162

Syrians Take Arctic Route to Europe

More than 150 refugees have entered Norway from Arctic Russia this year—a fraction of the estimated half-million people who have sought asylum in Europe, but the flow is quickening as Syrians share the tip for a cheaper and safer route.

E-Book Sales Weaken Amid Higher Prices

E-book revenue is falling, and some people in the publishing industry say it is partly because of the higher prices that have resulted from new contracts negotiated with Amazon.

Former Saab Board Members Hit With Forgery Charges

Former CEO Jan-Ake Jonsson and head lawyer Kristina Geers deny falsifying data to justify huge payments before car maker went bankrupt.

Vivendi Chairman Ousts Longtime Chief of Canal Plus

French billionaire and Vivendi Chairman Vincent Bolloré has ousted the longtime chief of Canal Plus, further tightening his grip over the Vivendi-owned pay-television group amid falling subscriber numbers.

Novartis to Begin Selling Copy of Amgen’s Neupogen in U.S.

Novartis said it will begin selling the first biosimilar drug in the U.S. at a 15% discount to the original after an appeals court denied Amgen’s request to block the Swiss drug maker’s sale of its copycat version of blockbuster remedy Neupogen.

Capital Account

For Russia, Oil Collapse Has Soviet Echoes

For most countries, the economic slowdown in China and the accompanying slump in commodity prices represent something between nuisance and pothole. For Russia, they are a catastrophe, writes Greg Ip. 94

Devaluation Strengthens China’s Hand at IMF

Beijing’s careful management of its currency since its devaluation last month is bolstering China’s bid to get the yuan included in the IMF’s basket of reserve currencies as soon as November.

Russia Says Economy Recovery Slow in Coming

The Russian government has acknowledged that the country’s economy is going to take longer to recover than it previously expected, weighed down by the slump in the value of the ruble.

Sweden Leaves Interest Rate Unchanged

Sweden’s central bank has left its main interest rate and bond-buying program unchanged, saying its existing policies were supporting the economy and would lead to inflation moving closer to its 2% target.

Middle East Crossroads

Yemen’s Unity Frays in Leaderless Aden

The battles of recent months have reopened historic divisions between Yemen’s north and south, writes Yaroslav Trofimov.

French Prosecutor Confirms Airplane Part in Reunion Belongs to MH370

A top French prosecutor confirmed the airplane debris that recently washed ashore on the French island of Reunion came from the Malaysia Airlines’ missing Boeing 777.

NATO Opens Post in Lithuania

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization inaugurated a new command post in Lithuania, one of six across the alliance’s eastern border meant to shore up the region’s defenses against Russia.

French Government Pledges More Help for Farmers

France’s government has pledged to increase aid for agriculture, after thousands of farmers converged on Paris and blocked the city’s streets with more than 1,500 tractors to protest against high costs and low prices.

Off Duty

Adventure & Travel

Not Far From Prague, a Czech Village Worth Rhapsodizing About

The frozen-in-time town of Český Krumlov has scenery and history—and beer—that keeps travelers coming back.

Arts

Film Review

‘La Jaula de Oro (The Golden Dream)’ Review: Dark Immigrant Odyssey

In Diego Quemada-Diez’s celebrated directorial debut, a trio of teenagers flee from Guatemala and make their way through a treacherous Mexico where police and gangsters prey on vulnerable travelers.

20 Odd Questions

Manolo Blahnik on Old Films and Kate Moss

The shoe designer on what he’d blow his money on, the drama behind Kate Moss’s wedding shoes and exactly how he feels about fake Manolos.

Video

Father of Drowned Syrian Boy Describes His Sorrow

1:52

Armed Police Remove Migrants From Train in Hungary

0:53

Migrant Crisis: The Schengen Agreement Explained

1:55

Fashion

What’s Your Sport-Coat Personality?

Designers are pushing the boundaries of the sport coat with ‘soft’ jackets and sweater hybrids, encouraging men to leave their comfort zones and try bolder styles; a guide to the new world of sport coats.

A Modigliani Painting for $100 Million?

Christie’s International said it expects to ask roughly $100 million for a Modigliani nude that will be auctioned this fall, a bold reflection of how prices for blue-chip paintings have skyrocketed in recent seasons.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
Die Seite Drei
Schnelle Analysen und Beobachtungen zum Zeitgeschehen

Das wahre Berliner Problem: Wer sitzt vorne und wer hinten

Wer geglaubt hatte, die weiteren Schritte in der Energiewende, die Mindestlohn- oder Sexismusdebatte sind die Themen, die das politische Berlin umtreiben, der hat noch nicht vom wahren Berliner Problem gehört: der Sitzordnung in der Bundespressekonferenz. Jeden Montag, Mittwoch und Freitag müssen sich die 14 Ministerien-Sprecher und der Regierungssprecher im Saal der Bundespressekonferenz vorne auf zwei Reihen verteilen, um sich dort den Fragen der Hauptstadtjournalisten zu stellen. In der ersten Reihe allerdings ist nur Platz für neun der 14 Ministeriumssprecher. Fünf Sprecherkollegen müssen somit nach hinten, in die zweite Reihe. In der sitzt wohl niemand gerne, und anscheinend noch weniger gerne, wenn sich der eigene Platz vorher in der ersten Reihe befand.

dapd
Verstellter Blick auf den Stein des Anstoßes: Die Sitzreihen der Bundespressekonferenz.

So beobachtet Anfang des Jahres. Da musste der Sprecher des Justizministeriums als vormaliger “Erste-Reihe-Sitzer” seinen Platz räumen und in die zweite Reihe umziehen. Dafür durfte der bis dato “Zweite-Reihe-Sitzer”, der Sprecher des Familienministeriums, nach vorne rücken. Wie war es dazu gekommen?

Wer vorne und wer hinten sitzt, darüber entschied bislang die Zahl der Fragen, die an einen Sprecher gerichtet wurde. Die Fragehäufigkeit wurde quartalsweise ausgewertet. Kochte in den aktuellen Debatten ein Thema hoch, war der Auskunftsbedarf beim zuständigen Ministerium natürlich gleich höher.

So kam es, dass wegen der Debatte um das Betreuungsgeld und der Äußerungen von Familienministerin Kristina Schröder zum Geschlecht Gottes der Sprecher im Familienministerium in den letzten drei Monaten des vergangenen Jahres im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes “gefragter” war als sein Kollege aus dem Justizressort. Jedes Mal mussten dann während der Pressekonferenz Familienressort- und Justizressortsprecher die Plätze wechseln. Das sorgte für Unruhe und Verzögerungen. Nicht zuletzt um das zu vermeiden, kam daher die Entscheidung zu Beginn des Jahres, das Familienministerium doch gleich in der ersten Reihe zu platzieren. Für die Justiz ging es erstmals nach hinten.

Streit um die Sitzordnung

Das ließ den Streit um die Sitzordnung eskalieren. Justizministeriumssprecher Anders Mertzlufft beschwerte sich gegen die Zurücksetzung seines Hauses. Das Justizministerium sei schließlich nicht irgendein Ministerium. Seither schwelte der Streit und eine Lösung für ein neues Vergabesystem der Sitzordnung musste her.

Ein sogenanntes “atmendes Rotationsprinzip” soll es nun richten. “Wir möchten vermeiden, dass für alle Zeiten eine Sitzordnung zementiert wird, die mit einem eventuellen langfristigen Bedeutungswandel einzelner Häuser nicht Schritt hält”, heißt es in dem Informationsschreiben der Bundespressekonferenz zur künftigen Regelung. Ab dem 1. April 2013 soll gelten: Die als “klassisch” definierten Ressorts wie Finanzen, Justiz, Verteidigung, Auswärtiges, Inneres und das Ressort des Vizekanzlers, also derzeit Wirtschaft, sitzen gesichert in der ersten Reihe. Der Justizministeriumssprecher könnte also Erfolg vermelden, scheint es. Doch es ist kein Erfolg auf ganzer Linie.

Denn – und hier kommt der “atmende” Aspekt der Lösung ins Spiel – die Platzreservierung ist nur für höchstens drei Quartale gesichert, dann könnte sie verfallen. Sollte sich herausstellen, dass Ressorts in der zweiten Reihe häufiger gefragt worden sind als die “klassischen” Ressorts, kommt es zur Rotation. Im Informationsschreiben liest sich das so: “Ist allerdings eines der “klassischen” Häuser über drei Quartale hinweg ohne Unterbrechung weniger gefragt worden als das jeweils meistgefragte Haus aus der zweiten Reihe, nimmt es für die Sitzordnung im folgenden Quartal an der Rotation teil”. Ansonsten gilt grundsätzlich, “dass am Ende jedes Quartales wie bisher die Fragehäufigkeit ermittelt und verglichen wird, ob das in der zweiten Reihe am häufigsten gefragte Ressort mehr aufgerufen wurde, als das in der ersten Reihe am wenigsten gefragte Haus. Diese beiden wechseln für das folgende Quartal die Plätze.”

Der Vorsitzende der Bundespressekonferenz Gregor Mayntz zeigte sich erleichtert, dass der Zwist beigelegt werden konnte. “Ich hätte mir niemals vorstellen können, dass eine solche Nebensächlichkeit solche Dimensionen annehmen könnte”, sagte er dem Wall Street Journal Deutschland. Es komme doch nun wirklich auf die Inhalte an und nicht auf die Sitzordnung. Schließlich habe jeder der Sprecher das Recht, ja sogar die Pflicht, sich zu äußern. Die Bundespressekonferenz heiße alle Sprecher als ihre Gäste willkommen, “und zwar völlig unabhängig davon, ob sie aus der ersten oder zweiten Reihe kommen”.

Für die Sprecher jedoch, die sich jedes Mal in die Pole-Position in der ersten Reihe der Bundespressekonferenz katapultieren wollen, hat Mayntz einen kleinen Tipp parat: “Der Sprecher, der von sich aus etwas aus seinem Ministerium sagen und mitteilen will, sitzt ohnehin beim Start der Bundespressekonferenz in der ersten Reihe”. Die Ministeriumssprecher haben es somit selbst in der Hand, ob sie aus der ersten oder zweiten Reihe starten.

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Die Seite Drei – Über uns

  • Schnell und kurz bringt „Die Seite Drei“ Einschätzungen, Hintergründe und Ergänzungen zu den Berichten des Wall Street Journal Deutschland. Hier bloggt die ganze Redaktion.

    Hinweise zu Themen, Anregungen und Ihre Fragen nehmen wir unter redaktion@wallstreetjournal.de entgegen.

The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

ECB Willing to Expand Stimulus Amid Growth Worry

ECB President Mario Draghi indicated that the bank stands ready to expand its stimulus programs and projected slower-than-expected economic growth in the eurozone, as well as lower inflation rates.

Volkswagen CFO Nominated as Board Chairman

The largest shareholder of European’s biggest auto maker nominated the company’s finance chief to become the next chairman of the VW supervisory board.

Iran’s Ali Larijani Says Parliament Must Approve Nuclear Agreement

Iran’s parliament will have the final say on whether Tehran approves or rejects the landmark nuclear agreement, senior Iranian officials said, raising fresh uncertainty about its future.

Jobs Report Could Seal Deal on Rates

The August employment report could make or break the case for the Federal Reserve raising rates this month.

Photos of a Syrian boy whose body washed ashore on a Turkish beach horrified people around the world as Europe’s migrant crisis escalates.

Photos of a Syrian boy whose body washed ashore on a Turkish beach horrified people around the world as Europe’s migrant crisis escalates.

Image of Syrian Boy Echoes Around World

The 3-year-old was a Syrian Kurd whose relatives’ efforts to emigrate to Canada had been rebuffed, according to media and Kurdish activists. 503

Hungary’s Leader Says Migrant Crisis Is Germany’s Problem

Hundreds of migrants rushed trains at Hungary’s main station as Prime Minister Viktor Orban blamed Germany for Europe’s migration crisis and warned that border-free travel within the bloc is at risk. 160

Syrians Take Arctic Route to Europe

More than 150 refugees have entered Norway from Arctic Russia this year—a fraction of the estimated half-million people who have sought asylum in Europe, but the flow is quickening as Syrians share the tip for a cheaper and safer route.

E-Book Sales Weaken Amid Higher Prices

E-book revenue is falling, and some people in the publishing industry say it is partly because of the higher prices that have resulted from new contracts negotiated with Amazon.

Former Saab Board Members Hit With Forgery Charges

Former CEO Jan-Ake Jonsson and head lawyer Kristina Geers deny falsifying data to justify huge payments before car maker went bankrupt.

Vivendi Chairman Ousts Longtime Chief of Canal Plus

French billionaire and Vivendi Chairman Vincent Bolloré has ousted the longtime chief of Canal Plus, further tightening his grip over the Vivendi-owned pay-television group amid falling subscriber numbers.

Novartis to Begin Selling Copy of Amgen’s Neupogen in U.S.

Novartis said it will begin selling the first biosimilar drug in the U.S. at a 15% discount to the original after an appeals court denied Amgen’s request to block the Swiss drug maker’s sale of its copycat version of blockbuster remedy Neupogen.

Capital Account

For Russia, Oil Collapse Has Soviet Echoes

For most countries, the economic slowdown in China and the accompanying slump in commodity prices represent something between nuisance and pothole. For Russia, they are a catastrophe, writes Greg Ip. 94

Devaluation Strengthens China’s Hand at IMF

Beijing’s careful management of its currency since its devaluation last month is bolstering China’s bid to get the yuan included in the IMF’s basket of reserve currencies as soon as November.

Russia Says Economy Recovery Slow in Coming

The Russian government has acknowledged that the country’s economy is going to take longer to recover than it previously expected, weighed down by the slump in the value of the ruble.

Sweden Leaves Interest Rate Unchanged

Sweden’s central bank has left its main interest rate and bond-buying program unchanged, saying its existing policies were supporting the economy and would lead to inflation moving closer to its 2% target.

Middle East Crossroads

Yemen’s Unity Frays in Leaderless Aden

The battles of recent months have reopened historic divisions between Yemen’s north and south, writes Yaroslav Trofimov.

French Prosecutor Confirms Airplane Part in Reunion Belongs to MH370

A top French prosecutor confirmed the airplane debris that recently washed ashore on the French island of Reunion came from the Malaysia Airlines’ missing Boeing 777.

NATO Opens Post in Lithuania

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization inaugurated a new command post in Lithuania, one of six across the alliance’s eastern border meant to shore up the region’s defenses against Russia.

French Government Pledges More Help for Farmers

France’s government has pledged to increase aid for agriculture, after thousands of farmers converged on Paris and blocked the city’s streets with more than 1,500 tractors to protest against high costs and low prices.

Off Duty

Adventure & Travel

Not Far From Prague, a Czech Village Worth Rhapsodizing About

The frozen-in-time town of Český Krumlov has scenery and history—and beer—that keeps travelers coming back.

Arts

Film Review

‘La Jaula de Oro (The Golden Dream)’ Review: Dark Immigrant Odyssey

In Diego Quemada-Diez’s celebrated directorial debut, a trio of teenagers flee from Guatemala and make their way through a treacherous Mexico where police and gangsters prey on vulnerable travelers.

20 Odd Questions

Manolo Blahnik on Old Films and Kate Moss

The shoe designer on what he’d blow his money on, the drama behind Kate Moss’s wedding shoes and exactly how he feels about fake Manolos.

Video

Father of Drowned Syrian Boy Describes His Sorrow

1:52

Armed Police Remove Migrants From Train in Hungary

0:53

Migrant Crisis: The Schengen Agreement Explained

1:55