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Stocks Fall to Cap Wild Month

Global stock markets headed lower at the end of a turbulent month that was dominated by concerns over China and the timing of a U.S. interest rate rise.

Merkel Urges Europe to Move on Migrant Crisis

German Chancellor Angela Merkel called on Europe to tackle the migrant crisis and agree on a fair distribution of people, warning that failing to do so might put the EU’s open-border policy at risk.

Iran Deal Could Open Door to Gulf Businesses

While executives in the Gulf see opportunities, the region’s governments remain at loggerheads on other issues.

Islamic State Blows Up Temple of Bel in Syria’s Palmyra

Islamic State has partially destroyed Palmyra’s 2,000-year-old Temple of Bel in a massive explosion, the latest in a series of attacks by the militants on the Syrian city’s famed historic sites. 152

Ukrainian National Guard Officer Killed, Dozens Injured in Protest Blast

One member of Ukraine’s National Guard was killed and at least 69 others were injured outside the country’s parliament, as fighting broke out between protesters and law-enforcement officers.

Eurozone Inflation Stays Low

Eurozone consumer prices were barely higher than a year earlier in August, keeping pressure on the European Central Bank to consider additional stimulus measures to bring inflation closer to its target near 2%.

Fed Appears to Hold Line on Rate Plan

Federal Reserve officials emerged from a week of head-spinning financial turbulence largely sticking to their plan to raise U.S. interest rates before the end of the year. 93

Google, Sanofi Team Up on Diabetes Research

The Internet company said its health-care research unit plans to work with European pharmaceutical major Sanofi on new ways to monitor and treat the condition.

Gazprom Posts 29% Net Profit Growth

Russian state gas giant PAO Gazprom said net profit for the second quarter was up 29% from the same period last year as a higher ruble price made up for lower sale volumes in its most-lucrative European market.

Apple, Cisco Unveil Business Partnership

Apple and Cisco Systems are teaming up to help bring more iPhones and iPads to business users.

Iliad Lifted by New Mobile Clients

Iliad said net profit rose 16% in the first half as the French low-cost telecom company continued to win over new mobile clients with its ultracheap tariff plans.

Oil Rallies Into Bull Market Territory

U.S. oil prices jumped 8.8% Monday amid speculation that oil-producing nations might be willing to agree to output cuts to shrink the global glut of crude oil.

Abreast of the Market

Rocky Markets Could Be Good for These Stocks

Exchanges and market makers are getting a fresh look from portfolio managers seeking out investments likely to benefit from the large market swings.

Dollar Slumped Against Euro, Yen in August

The dollar retreated against the euro and the yen in August as rising concerns over global growth and inflation moved investors to push back expectations for higher U.S. interest rates and exit from some of their large consensus trades.

China’s Two-Yuan Dilemma

Since China devalued the yuan on Aug. 11, the spread between its value in Hong Kong and in the mainland has widened—a complication for Beijing’s ambitions to raise the currency’s global profile.

China ‘Punishes’ Nearly 200 People for Spreading Rumors

Sweep targets people who the government said spread false Internet rumors regarding the stock-market turmoil and deadly blasts in Tianjin. 51

U.A.E. Takes Lead in Southern Yemen

U.A.E. forces prevented Houthi rebels in Yemen from overrunning the Yemeni port city of Aden and now also reluctantly find themselves in the business of nation-building.

Biden Faces Narrow Path

As Vice President Joe Biden weighs a presidential bid, he must confront a number of fundamental questions. Among them: Does he have a viable path through an electoral map that is becoming more treacherous? 316

France to Finance Tax Cuts With Cost Savings

The French government says it can find $2.2 billion worth of savings in 2016 to pay for tax cuts for households without sacrificing France’s commitment to reduce the budget deficit.

Climate Change Builds as 2016 Issue

President Barack Obama’s trip to Alaska’s Arctic on Monday will likely reverberate much farther south, on the 2016 presidential campaign trail, where global warming is expected to emerge as a key issue. 589

Suppliers Feel Pain as Coal Miners Struggle

As big coal miners struggle, their equipment suppliers—thousands of businesses sprinkled throughout Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky—are scrambling to find new customers anywhere they can. 127

Eni Reports Huge Natural-Gas Discovery off Egypt

Eni SpA said it made a massive natural-gas discovery off the coast of Egypt in what the Italian oil-and-gas company is calling the largest ever find in the Mediterranean Sea.

China Slowdown to Hit Asia Electronics Supply Chain

After several years of torrid expansion, the slowdown in smartphone sales in China is expected to hit Asian parts suppliers.

U.K. Approves Giant North Sea Gas Project

A.P. Møller-Maersk A/S said it has received approval to develop the $4.5 billion Culzean gas field, the largest new find in the U.K. North Sea for a decade.

Startups Put Data in Farmers’ Hands

Farmers and startups like Farmobile and Granular are starting to compete with agribusiness giants over the newest commodity being harvested on U.S. farms—data.

Video

Ukraine Protest Blast Kills Officer, Injures Dozens

0:45

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

For a Triathlon Junkie, Training In Wind, in Water and on Weekends

Triathlete Tony Pritzker, who has completed 10 Half Ironman and eight Ironman races, packs training into his social life to keep up with his schedule of endurance events.

IMAGE 1 of 12

Video Music Awards 2015

Kanye West gave a long rant at the MTV Video Music Awards as he apologized to Taylor Swift for taking her microphone in 2009. Swift presented West with the Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award. Earlier, she and Nicki Minaj buried their beef by joining forces onstage.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
Die Seite Drei
Schnelle Analysen und Beobachtungen zum Zeitgeschehen

Das wahre Berliner Problem: Wer sitzt vorne und wer hinten

Wer geglaubt hatte, die weiteren Schritte in der Energiewende, die Mindestlohn- oder Sexismusdebatte sind die Themen, die das politische Berlin umtreiben, der hat noch nicht vom wahren Berliner Problem gehört: der Sitzordnung in der Bundespressekonferenz. Jeden Montag, Mittwoch und Freitag müssen sich die 14 Ministerien-Sprecher und der Regierungssprecher im Saal der Bundespressekonferenz vorne auf zwei Reihen verteilen, um sich dort den Fragen der Hauptstadtjournalisten zu stellen. In der ersten Reihe allerdings ist nur Platz für neun der 14 Ministeriumssprecher. Fünf Sprecherkollegen müssen somit nach hinten, in die zweite Reihe. In der sitzt wohl niemand gerne, und anscheinend noch weniger gerne, wenn sich der eigene Platz vorher in der ersten Reihe befand.

dapd
Verstellter Blick auf den Stein des Anstoßes: Die Sitzreihen der Bundespressekonferenz.

So beobachtet Anfang des Jahres. Da musste der Sprecher des Justizministeriums als vormaliger “Erste-Reihe-Sitzer” seinen Platz räumen und in die zweite Reihe umziehen. Dafür durfte der bis dato “Zweite-Reihe-Sitzer”, der Sprecher des Familienministeriums, nach vorne rücken. Wie war es dazu gekommen?

Wer vorne und wer hinten sitzt, darüber entschied bislang die Zahl der Fragen, die an einen Sprecher gerichtet wurde. Die Fragehäufigkeit wurde quartalsweise ausgewertet. Kochte in den aktuellen Debatten ein Thema hoch, war der Auskunftsbedarf beim zuständigen Ministerium natürlich gleich höher.

So kam es, dass wegen der Debatte um das Betreuungsgeld und der Äußerungen von Familienministerin Kristina Schröder zum Geschlecht Gottes der Sprecher im Familienministerium in den letzten drei Monaten des vergangenen Jahres im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes “gefragter” war als sein Kollege aus dem Justizressort. Jedes Mal mussten dann während der Pressekonferenz Familienressort- und Justizressortsprecher die Plätze wechseln. Das sorgte für Unruhe und Verzögerungen. Nicht zuletzt um das zu vermeiden, kam daher die Entscheidung zu Beginn des Jahres, das Familienministerium doch gleich in der ersten Reihe zu platzieren. Für die Justiz ging es erstmals nach hinten.

Streit um die Sitzordnung

Das ließ den Streit um die Sitzordnung eskalieren. Justizministeriumssprecher Anders Mertzlufft beschwerte sich gegen die Zurücksetzung seines Hauses. Das Justizministerium sei schließlich nicht irgendein Ministerium. Seither schwelte der Streit und eine Lösung für ein neues Vergabesystem der Sitzordnung musste her.

Ein sogenanntes “atmendes Rotationsprinzip” soll es nun richten. “Wir möchten vermeiden, dass für alle Zeiten eine Sitzordnung zementiert wird, die mit einem eventuellen langfristigen Bedeutungswandel einzelner Häuser nicht Schritt hält”, heißt es in dem Informationsschreiben der Bundespressekonferenz zur künftigen Regelung. Ab dem 1. April 2013 soll gelten: Die als “klassisch” definierten Ressorts wie Finanzen, Justiz, Verteidigung, Auswärtiges, Inneres und das Ressort des Vizekanzlers, also derzeit Wirtschaft, sitzen gesichert in der ersten Reihe. Der Justizministeriumssprecher könnte also Erfolg vermelden, scheint es. Doch es ist kein Erfolg auf ganzer Linie.

Denn – und hier kommt der “atmende” Aspekt der Lösung ins Spiel – die Platzreservierung ist nur für höchstens drei Quartale gesichert, dann könnte sie verfallen. Sollte sich herausstellen, dass Ressorts in der zweiten Reihe häufiger gefragt worden sind als die “klassischen” Ressorts, kommt es zur Rotation. Im Informationsschreiben liest sich das so: “Ist allerdings eines der “klassischen” Häuser über drei Quartale hinweg ohne Unterbrechung weniger gefragt worden als das jeweils meistgefragte Haus aus der zweiten Reihe, nimmt es für die Sitzordnung im folgenden Quartal an der Rotation teil”. Ansonsten gilt grundsätzlich, “dass am Ende jedes Quartales wie bisher die Fragehäufigkeit ermittelt und verglichen wird, ob das in der zweiten Reihe am häufigsten gefragte Ressort mehr aufgerufen wurde, als das in der ersten Reihe am wenigsten gefragte Haus. Diese beiden wechseln für das folgende Quartal die Plätze.”

Der Vorsitzende der Bundespressekonferenz Gregor Mayntz zeigte sich erleichtert, dass der Zwist beigelegt werden konnte. “Ich hätte mir niemals vorstellen können, dass eine solche Nebensächlichkeit solche Dimensionen annehmen könnte”, sagte er dem Wall Street Journal Deutschland. Es komme doch nun wirklich auf die Inhalte an und nicht auf die Sitzordnung. Schließlich habe jeder der Sprecher das Recht, ja sogar die Pflicht, sich zu äußern. Die Bundespressekonferenz heiße alle Sprecher als ihre Gäste willkommen, “und zwar völlig unabhängig davon, ob sie aus der ersten oder zweiten Reihe kommen”.

Für die Sprecher jedoch, die sich jedes Mal in die Pole-Position in der ersten Reihe der Bundespressekonferenz katapultieren wollen, hat Mayntz einen kleinen Tipp parat: “Der Sprecher, der von sich aus etwas aus seinem Ministerium sagen und mitteilen will, sitzt ohnehin beim Start der Bundespressekonferenz in der ersten Reihe”. Die Ministeriumssprecher haben es somit selbst in der Hand, ob sie aus der ersten oder zweiten Reihe starten.

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Die Seite Drei – Über uns

  • Schnell und kurz bringt „Die Seite Drei“ Einschätzungen, Hintergründe und Ergänzungen zu den Berichten des Wall Street Journal Deutschland. Hier bloggt die ganze Redaktion.

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The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Stocks Fall to Cap Wild Month

Global stock markets headed lower at the end of a turbulent month that was dominated by concerns over China and the timing of a U.S. interest rate rise.

Merkel Urges Europe to Move on Migrant Crisis

German Chancellor Angela Merkel called on Europe to tackle the migrant crisis and agree on a fair distribution of people, warning that failing to do so might put the EU’s open-border policy at risk.

Iran Deal Could Open Door to Gulf Businesses

While executives in the Gulf see opportunities, the region’s governments remain at loggerheads on other issues.

Islamic State Blows Up Temple of Bel in Syria’s Palmyra

Islamic State has partially destroyed Palmyra’s 2,000-year-old Temple of Bel in a massive explosion, the latest in a series of attacks by the militants on the Syrian city’s famed historic sites. 152

Ukrainian National Guard Officer Killed, Dozens Injured in Protest Blast

One member of Ukraine’s National Guard was killed and at least 69 others were injured outside the country’s parliament, as fighting broke out between protesters and law-enforcement officers.

Eurozone Inflation Stays Low

Eurozone consumer prices were barely higher than a year earlier in August, keeping pressure on the European Central Bank to consider additional stimulus measures to bring inflation closer to its target near 2%.

Fed Appears to Hold Line on Rate Plan

Federal Reserve officials emerged from a week of head-spinning financial turbulence largely sticking to their plan to raise U.S. interest rates before the end of the year. 93

Google, Sanofi Team Up on Diabetes Research

The Internet company said its health-care research unit plans to work with European pharmaceutical major Sanofi on new ways to monitor and treat the condition.

Gazprom Posts 29% Net Profit Growth

Russian state gas giant PAO Gazprom said net profit for the second quarter was up 29% from the same period last year as a higher ruble price made up for lower sale volumes in its most-lucrative European market.

Apple, Cisco Unveil Business Partnership

Apple and Cisco Systems are teaming up to help bring more iPhones and iPads to business users.

Iliad Lifted by New Mobile Clients

Iliad said net profit rose 16% in the first half as the French low-cost telecom company continued to win over new mobile clients with its ultracheap tariff plans.

Oil Rallies Into Bull Market Territory

U.S. oil prices jumped 8.8% Monday amid speculation that oil-producing nations might be willing to agree to output cuts to shrink the global glut of crude oil.

Abreast of the Market

Rocky Markets Could Be Good for These Stocks

Exchanges and market makers are getting a fresh look from portfolio managers seeking out investments likely to benefit from the large market swings.

Dollar Slumped Against Euro, Yen in August

The dollar retreated against the euro and the yen in August as rising concerns over global growth and inflation moved investors to push back expectations for higher U.S. interest rates and exit from some of their large consensus trades.

China’s Two-Yuan Dilemma

Since China devalued the yuan on Aug. 11, the spread between its value in Hong Kong and in the mainland has widened—a complication for Beijing’s ambitions to raise the currency’s global profile.

China ‘Punishes’ Nearly 200 People for Spreading Rumors

Sweep targets people who the government said spread false Internet rumors regarding the stock-market turmoil and deadly blasts in Tianjin. 51

U.A.E. Takes Lead in Southern Yemen

U.A.E. forces prevented Houthi rebels in Yemen from overrunning the Yemeni port city of Aden and now also reluctantly find themselves in the business of nation-building.

Biden Faces Narrow Path

As Vice President Joe Biden weighs a presidential bid, he must confront a number of fundamental questions. Among them: Does he have a viable path through an electoral map that is becoming more treacherous? 316

France to Finance Tax Cuts With Cost Savings

The French government says it can find $2.2 billion worth of savings in 2016 to pay for tax cuts for households without sacrificing France’s commitment to reduce the budget deficit.

Climate Change Builds as 2016 Issue

President Barack Obama’s trip to Alaska’s Arctic on Monday will likely reverberate much farther south, on the 2016 presidential campaign trail, where global warming is expected to emerge as a key issue. 589

Suppliers Feel Pain as Coal Miners Struggle

As big coal miners struggle, their equipment suppliers—thousands of businesses sprinkled throughout Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky—are scrambling to find new customers anywhere they can. 127

Eni Reports Huge Natural-Gas Discovery off Egypt

Eni SpA said it made a massive natural-gas discovery off the coast of Egypt in what the Italian oil-and-gas company is calling the largest ever find in the Mediterranean Sea.

China Slowdown to Hit Asia Electronics Supply Chain

After several years of torrid expansion, the slowdown in smartphone sales in China is expected to hit Asian parts suppliers.

U.K. Approves Giant North Sea Gas Project

A.P. Møller-Maersk A/S said it has received approval to develop the $4.5 billion Culzean gas field, the largest new find in the U.K. North Sea for a decade.

Startups Put Data in Farmers’ Hands

Farmers and startups like Farmobile and Granular are starting to compete with agribusiness giants over the newest commodity being harvested on U.S. farms—data.

Video

Ukraine Protest Blast Kills Officer, Injures Dozens

0:45

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11