The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Four Men to Face Charges Over Migrant Deaths

A Hungarian court said four men could face up to 16 years in prison for alleged people trafficking in connection with the deaths of 71 migrants found in an abandoned truck.

Turkey Bombs Islamic State Targets in Syria as Part of U.S.-Led Coalition

Turkish jets bombed Islamic State targets in Syria under the umbrella of the U.S.-led international coalition for the first time, the country’s government said, as Turkey expands its fight against the extremist group.

Egyptian Court Sentences Al Jazeera Journalists

An Egyptian judge sentenced a trio of Al Jazeera English journalists to three years in prison, prompting fresh criticism of the government’s clampdown on press and political freedoms.

Thousands March Against Lebanon Government

A demonstration in Beirut against poor waste management blossomed into full-throated demands that Lebanon’s long-standing political class step down from power.

Stock Swings Don’t Shake Investors

Stock indexes’ wildest week in years rattled investors and fueled expectations for further price swings, but it failed to squelch the belief U.S. markets remain the best place to put money. 58

Fed’s Fischer: ‘Good Reason’ to Think U.S. Inflation Will Move Higher

The Fed‘s Stanley Fischer said there is “good reason” to think sluggish U.S. inflation will firm and move back toward the U.S. central bank’s 2% annual target, touching on a significant assessment facing the Fed ahead of its September policy meeting. 67

New Orleans Honors Katrina’s Victims on Anniversary

A city known for its resilience marked the 10th anniversary of one of the worst natural disasters ever to hit the United States on Saturday, beginning with a somber ceremony at a memorial to Hurricane Katrina’s victims.

France, Germany Warn Putin on Ukraine Separatist Elections

Leaders of France and Germany told Russian President Vladimir Putin that rebel-run elections conducted in the separatist-controlled regions of Ukraine would endanger the so-called Minsk peace process.

Rice to Press Pakistan on Antiterror Vigilance

National security adviser Susan Rice is set to arrive in Pakistan on Sunday to press the country’s government to do more to prevent terrorists from using its territory as a base for attacks on neighboring states.

Treading Line Between War and Peace, U.S. Special Forces Groom Afghan Troops

The U.S. military allowed The Wall Street Journal to visit a variety of commando units, offering a glimpse into what may be the last fighting season of America’s longest war. 70

Foreign Man Arrested in Bangkok Blast Probe

Thai police said they arrested a foreign man whom they described as a suspect in this month’s deadly bombing of a Bangkok shrine that is popular with Chinese tourists.

Thousands Protest Against Malaysia’s Najib Razak

Protests against Prime Minister Najib Razak’s management of the economy and the debt problems at a state investment fund entered a second day.

Buying the Dips Doesn’t Work for Everyone

The old strategy of buying the dips may not work for everyone. In fact, for some people, it could be disastrous, writes Jason Zweig.

How Do You Short China?

Traders are scouring stock, bond and currency markets for ways to make money on the malaise afflicting China. Some are piling into insurance-like contracts that would pay out if the country defaulted on a small pool of its foreign-denominated bonds.

Myanmar Buzz Fades for Many U.S. Investors

Disenchantment with the business climate, especially among American companies, comes as concerns are spreading about Myanmar’s political future.

A ‘Black Swan’ Fund Made $1 Billion This Week

Universa Hedge Fund, a well-known ‘black swan’ fund, made more than $1 billion in profits in one week amid volatility. 53

Inmarsat Says Russian Proton Rocket Puts Satellite Into Orbit

Inmarsat declared the launch of a Russian Proton rocket carrying one of its satellites a success after the rocket delivered its cargo into its initial orbit position.

China’s Moves Won’t Help U.S. Tech Firms

China’s moves to spur its slowing economy are having an important but less obvious effect on the tech sector: Strengthening local companies that already were making life difficult for U.S. rivals.

European Refiners’ Profit Revival Faces End

Europe’s biggest energy companies have enjoyed a revival of refinery profits, but that run may be winding down even as oil prices slump.

Syngenta Shareholders Not Happy

Some Syngenta shareholders are angry about the pesticide-and-seed giant’s rejection of takeover proposals from rival Monsanto, which abandoned its pursuit this week.

U.S.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R., Tenn.), right, listens to Sen. John Barrasso (R., Wyo.) last month in Washington, D.C.

Foes Try New Ways To Attack Iran Deal

Congressional opponents of the Iranian nuclear accord are devising a Plan B as President Obama moves closer to locking up the support needed to implement the deal. 666

Book Reviews

Stieg Larsson’s Heroine Lives Again

David Lagercrantz’s “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” revives Lisbeth Salander in fitting style.

World War II’s Greatest Escape

Allied prisoners broke out of a German camp using ladders inspired by medieval siege tools.

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09

On Wine: Will Lyons

Why Gin Is Back With a Flourish

Gin is experiencing the kind of boom the wine industry experienced in the mid-1980s, as boutique-distilled bottles with names like Half Hitch, Opihr and Ransom Old Tom give the classic G&T a new—and flavorful—twist

Music

Foals’ ‘What Went Down’ Is a Visceral Confessional

Yannis Philippakis, the lead singer whose energetic stage presence and novelistic lyrics have made Foals one of British rock’s most compelling propositions, talks about the band’s fourth album.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
Die Seite Drei
Schnelle Analysen und Beobachtungen zum Zeitgeschehen

Das wahre Berliner Problem: Wer sitzt vorne und wer hinten

Wer geglaubt hatte, die weiteren Schritte in der Energiewende, die Mindestlohn- oder Sexismusdebatte sind die Themen, die das politische Berlin umtreiben, der hat noch nicht vom wahren Berliner Problem gehört: der Sitzordnung in der Bundespressekonferenz. Jeden Montag, Mittwoch und Freitag müssen sich die 14 Ministerien-Sprecher und der Regierungssprecher im Saal der Bundespressekonferenz vorne auf zwei Reihen verteilen, um sich dort den Fragen der Hauptstadtjournalisten zu stellen. In der ersten Reihe allerdings ist nur Platz für neun der 14 Ministeriumssprecher. Fünf Sprecherkollegen müssen somit nach hinten, in die zweite Reihe. In der sitzt wohl niemand gerne, und anscheinend noch weniger gerne, wenn sich der eigene Platz vorher in der ersten Reihe befand.

dapd
Verstellter Blick auf den Stein des Anstoßes: Die Sitzreihen der Bundespressekonferenz.

So beobachtet Anfang des Jahres. Da musste der Sprecher des Justizministeriums als vormaliger “Erste-Reihe-Sitzer” seinen Platz räumen und in die zweite Reihe umziehen. Dafür durfte der bis dato “Zweite-Reihe-Sitzer”, der Sprecher des Familienministeriums, nach vorne rücken. Wie war es dazu gekommen?

Wer vorne und wer hinten sitzt, darüber entschied bislang die Zahl der Fragen, die an einen Sprecher gerichtet wurde. Die Fragehäufigkeit wurde quartalsweise ausgewertet. Kochte in den aktuellen Debatten ein Thema hoch, war der Auskunftsbedarf beim zuständigen Ministerium natürlich gleich höher.

So kam es, dass wegen der Debatte um das Betreuungsgeld und der Äußerungen von Familienministerin Kristina Schröder zum Geschlecht Gottes der Sprecher im Familienministerium in den letzten drei Monaten des vergangenen Jahres im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes “gefragter” war als sein Kollege aus dem Justizressort. Jedes Mal mussten dann während der Pressekonferenz Familienressort- und Justizressortsprecher die Plätze wechseln. Das sorgte für Unruhe und Verzögerungen. Nicht zuletzt um das zu vermeiden, kam daher die Entscheidung zu Beginn des Jahres, das Familienministerium doch gleich in der ersten Reihe zu platzieren. Für die Justiz ging es erstmals nach hinten.

Streit um die Sitzordnung

Das ließ den Streit um die Sitzordnung eskalieren. Justizministeriumssprecher Anders Mertzlufft beschwerte sich gegen die Zurücksetzung seines Hauses. Das Justizministerium sei schließlich nicht irgendein Ministerium. Seither schwelte der Streit und eine Lösung für ein neues Vergabesystem der Sitzordnung musste her.

Ein sogenanntes “atmendes Rotationsprinzip” soll es nun richten. “Wir möchten vermeiden, dass für alle Zeiten eine Sitzordnung zementiert wird, die mit einem eventuellen langfristigen Bedeutungswandel einzelner Häuser nicht Schritt hält”, heißt es in dem Informationsschreiben der Bundespressekonferenz zur künftigen Regelung. Ab dem 1. April 2013 soll gelten: Die als “klassisch” definierten Ressorts wie Finanzen, Justiz, Verteidigung, Auswärtiges, Inneres und das Ressort des Vizekanzlers, also derzeit Wirtschaft, sitzen gesichert in der ersten Reihe. Der Justizministeriumssprecher könnte also Erfolg vermelden, scheint es. Doch es ist kein Erfolg auf ganzer Linie.

Denn – und hier kommt der “atmende” Aspekt der Lösung ins Spiel – die Platzreservierung ist nur für höchstens drei Quartale gesichert, dann könnte sie verfallen. Sollte sich herausstellen, dass Ressorts in der zweiten Reihe häufiger gefragt worden sind als die “klassischen” Ressorts, kommt es zur Rotation. Im Informationsschreiben liest sich das so: “Ist allerdings eines der “klassischen” Häuser über drei Quartale hinweg ohne Unterbrechung weniger gefragt worden als das jeweils meistgefragte Haus aus der zweiten Reihe, nimmt es für die Sitzordnung im folgenden Quartal an der Rotation teil”. Ansonsten gilt grundsätzlich, “dass am Ende jedes Quartales wie bisher die Fragehäufigkeit ermittelt und verglichen wird, ob das in der zweiten Reihe am häufigsten gefragte Ressort mehr aufgerufen wurde, als das in der ersten Reihe am wenigsten gefragte Haus. Diese beiden wechseln für das folgende Quartal die Plätze.”

Der Vorsitzende der Bundespressekonferenz Gregor Mayntz zeigte sich erleichtert, dass der Zwist beigelegt werden konnte. “Ich hätte mir niemals vorstellen können, dass eine solche Nebensächlichkeit solche Dimensionen annehmen könnte”, sagte er dem Wall Street Journal Deutschland. Es komme doch nun wirklich auf die Inhalte an und nicht auf die Sitzordnung. Schließlich habe jeder der Sprecher das Recht, ja sogar die Pflicht, sich zu äußern. Die Bundespressekonferenz heiße alle Sprecher als ihre Gäste willkommen, “und zwar völlig unabhängig davon, ob sie aus der ersten oder zweiten Reihe kommen”.

Für die Sprecher jedoch, die sich jedes Mal in die Pole-Position in der ersten Reihe der Bundespressekonferenz katapultieren wollen, hat Mayntz einen kleinen Tipp parat: “Der Sprecher, der von sich aus etwas aus seinem Ministerium sagen und mitteilen will, sitzt ohnehin beim Start der Bundespressekonferenz in der ersten Reihe”. Die Ministeriumssprecher haben es somit selbst in der Hand, ob sie aus der ersten oder zweiten Reihe starten.

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Die Seite Drei – Über uns

  • Schnell und kurz bringt „Die Seite Drei“ Einschätzungen, Hintergründe und Ergänzungen zu den Berichten des Wall Street Journal Deutschland. Hier bloggt die ganze Redaktion.

    Hinweise zu Themen, Anregungen und Ihre Fragen nehmen wir unter redaktion@wallstreetjournal.de entgegen.

The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Four Men to Face Charges Over Migrant Deaths

A Hungarian court said four men could face up to 16 years in prison for alleged people trafficking in connection with the deaths of 71 migrants found in an abandoned truck.

Turkey Bombs Islamic State Targets in Syria as Part of U.S.-Led Coalition

Turkish jets bombed Islamic State targets in Syria under the umbrella of the U.S.-led international coalition for the first time, the country’s government said, as Turkey expands its fight against the extremist group.

Egyptian Court Sentences Al Jazeera Journalists

An Egyptian judge sentenced a trio of Al Jazeera English journalists to three years in prison, prompting fresh criticism of the government’s clampdown on press and political freedoms.

Thousands March Against Lebanon Government

A demonstration in Beirut against poor waste management blossomed into full-throated demands that Lebanon’s long-standing political class step down from power.

Stock Swings Don’t Shake Investors

Stock indexes’ wildest week in years rattled investors and fueled expectations for further price swings, but it failed to squelch the belief U.S. markets remain the best place to put money. 58

Fed’s Fischer: ‘Good Reason’ to Think U.S. Inflation Will Move Higher

The Fed‘s Stanley Fischer said there is “good reason” to think sluggish U.S. inflation will firm and move back toward the U.S. central bank’s 2% annual target, touching on a significant assessment facing the Fed ahead of its September policy meeting. 67

New Orleans Honors Katrina’s Victims on Anniversary

A city known for its resilience marked the 10th anniversary of one of the worst natural disasters ever to hit the United States on Saturday, beginning with a somber ceremony at a memorial to Hurricane Katrina’s victims.

France, Germany Warn Putin on Ukraine Separatist Elections

Leaders of France and Germany told Russian President Vladimir Putin that rebel-run elections conducted in the separatist-controlled regions of Ukraine would endanger the so-called Minsk peace process.

Rice to Press Pakistan on Antiterror Vigilance

National security adviser Susan Rice is set to arrive in Pakistan on Sunday to press the country’s government to do more to prevent terrorists from using its territory as a base for attacks on neighboring states.

Treading Line Between War and Peace, U.S. Special Forces Groom Afghan Troops

The U.S. military allowed The Wall Street Journal to visit a variety of commando units, offering a glimpse into what may be the last fighting season of America’s longest war. 70

Foreign Man Arrested in Bangkok Blast Probe

Thai police said they arrested a foreign man whom they described as a suspect in this month’s deadly bombing of a Bangkok shrine that is popular with Chinese tourists.

Thousands Protest Against Malaysia’s Najib Razak

Protests against Prime Minister Najib Razak’s management of the economy and the debt problems at a state investment fund entered a second day.

Buying the Dips Doesn’t Work for Everyone

The old strategy of buying the dips may not work for everyone. In fact, for some people, it could be disastrous, writes Jason Zweig.

How Do You Short China?

Traders are scouring stock, bond and currency markets for ways to make money on the malaise afflicting China. Some are piling into insurance-like contracts that would pay out if the country defaulted on a small pool of its foreign-denominated bonds.

Myanmar Buzz Fades for Many U.S. Investors

Disenchantment with the business climate, especially among American companies, comes as concerns are spreading about Myanmar’s political future.

A ‘Black Swan’ Fund Made $1 Billion This Week

Universa Hedge Fund, a well-known ‘black swan’ fund, made more than $1 billion in profits in one week amid volatility. 53

Inmarsat Says Russian Proton Rocket Puts Satellite Into Orbit

Inmarsat declared the launch of a Russian Proton rocket carrying one of its satellites a success after the rocket delivered its cargo into its initial orbit position.

China’s Moves Won’t Help U.S. Tech Firms

China’s moves to spur its slowing economy are having an important but less obvious effect on the tech sector: Strengthening local companies that already were making life difficult for U.S. rivals.

European Refiners’ Profit Revival Faces End

Europe’s biggest energy companies have enjoyed a revival of refinery profits, but that run may be winding down even as oil prices slump.

Syngenta Shareholders Not Happy

Some Syngenta shareholders are angry about the pesticide-and-seed giant’s rejection of takeover proposals from rival Monsanto, which abandoned its pursuit this week.

U.S.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R., Tenn.), right, listens to Sen. John Barrasso (R., Wyo.) last month in Washington, D.C.

Foes Try New Ways To Attack Iran Deal

Congressional opponents of the Iranian nuclear accord are devising a Plan B as President Obama moves closer to locking up the support needed to implement the deal. 666

Book Reviews

Stieg Larsson’s Heroine Lives Again

David Lagercrantz’s “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” revives Lisbeth Salander in fitting style.

World War II’s Greatest Escape

Allied prisoners broke out of a German camp using ladders inspired by medieval siege tools.

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09