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Stocks Tumble on Weak Chinese Data

U.S. stocks tumbled Tuesday as fears about a slowdown in China’s economy deepened, illustrating how last week’s market volatility has not yet abated. 273

Investors Betting on More ECB Stimulus

Six months after the European Central Bank launched its blockbuster bond-buying program to rouse the region’s economy, some investors are betting that authorities will crank stimulus efforts even higher.

Analysis

Clashing Interests Hamstring EU Response to Crisis

Europe’s migrant struggle highlights the chasm between Europe’s principles and its ability to live up to them.

Greek Polls Suggest Tough Election Test for Tsipras

Opinion polls show declining support for Greece’s Syriza party and its leader, Alexis Tsipras. But Syriza retains a lead over its opponents and the Sept. 20 election could be tight.

EU Set to Extend Sanctions on Russians, Ukraine Rebels

The EU is set to roll over until mid-March sanctions targeted against almost 200 Russian and Ukrainian-separatist individuals and firms to keep pressure on Moscow to fully implement the Minsk cease-fire terms by year end.

China Imposes New Controls to Keep Money From Leaving Country

China is imposing fresh controls to prevent too much money from leaving the country, in an effort to keep funds at home.

Pope to Make It Easier for Priests to Grant Pardons for Abortion

Pope Francis will make it easier for priests to forgive women for having had abortions, and those who assisted, during a “year of mercy” starting Dec. 8. 522

Russian Airline Aeroflot to Take Control of Carrier Transaero

Russia’s largest airline, state-controlled Aeroflot, will take control of the country’s No. 2 carrier Transaero in a government-brokered deal to stave off bankruptcy at the heavily indebted company.

Apple’s Ian Rogers Is Going to LVMH

LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton has recruited Ian Rogers, a key executive from Apple, to spearhead the expansion of the luxury goods giant’s online retail presence.

‘Super-Sizing’ Natural Gas Output

Applying newer fracking techniques to a prolific natural-gas region that straddles Louisiana and Texas could give the U.S. more—and much cheaper—supplies of the fuel for many years.

U.S. Report Sees Economic Benefit in Allowing Oil Exports

Lifting the nation’s four-decade ban on oil exports wouldn’t raise gas prices and could help lower them, a government study concludes.

Bayer Separates Material Science Business

German pharmaceuticals group Bayer has moved a step closer to floating its $12.38 billion specialty chemicals business by legally and economically separating the unit, now named Covestro.

Heard on the Street

In a World Awash with Gas, Why Finding More is Good for Eni

Italy’s Eni has found a big gas field in Egypt. That highlights its strengths as the company also gets its financial house in order.

Service Providers See Gold in Shares of Startups

Branding firm Red Antler is among vendors that are looking to profit on the soaring valuations of young startups by taking payment in stock instead of cash.

Portuguese Central Bank Ends Talks With Anbang Over Novo Banco Sale

Portugal’s central bank will now enter talks with another bidder for the Portuguese bank created out of failed lender Banco Espírito Santo last year.

South African Gold Faces Uncertain Future

South Africa’s gold mining industry must undergo radical change to cope with falling prices, intensifying labor disputes and the surging cost of ever-deeper exploration.

Main Suspect in Bangkok Bombing Arrested

Thailand’s prime minister said security forces arrested a man whom they believe to be the primary suspect in the bombing of a shrine in Bangkok last month.

China’s World

In China’s Heartland, Small Cities Flourish

Fengdu on the Yangtze River is one of hundreds of smaller Chinese cities still bursting with consumer vitality. It’s if these striving cities lose momentum that China is in danger of failing, writes Andrew Browne.

Death Toll Rises After Ukraine Protest Blast

The death toll from Monday’s blast outside Ukraine’s parliament rose to three, and police said the man suspected of throwing a grenade was a volunteer fighter on leave from a unit fighting Russian-backed separatists.

Kentucky Clerk Defies High Court, Denies Gays Marriage Licenses

A county clerk in Kentucky who is defying the U.S. Supreme Court by refusing to license same-sex marriage has been summoned to explain to a federal judge why she shouldn’t face stiff fines or jail time. 947

Lebanese ‘YouStink’ Activists Occupy Minister’s Offices

Members of a grass-roots antigovernment movement occupied the offices of the environment minister in Beirut to press their demands for his resignation.

Technology

Russia Puts Off Data Showdown With Technology Firms

Facebook, Google and Twitter are among the U.S. companies that are getting more time to comply with a new law requiring Russian data centers.

Sports

Are You Good Enough to Be a Tennis Line Judge?

Watch a series of shots at full speed and decide whether each was in or out. Some will be traveling upwards of 100 miles per hour and you only get one chance to make the call. Good luck!

Soccer

FIFA May Weaken Its Executive Committee

The executive committee of FIFA, soccer’s world governing body, will be the first target of major reforms when the organization meets in Zurich next month.

Video

Hungary Stops Migrants Boarding Trains To Germany

1:46

Ukraine Protest Blast Kills Officer, Injures Dozens

0:45

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Management

Dealing With ‘Daddy Track’: Men Face Challenges Going Part Time

As women make strides in the workplace and men shoulder more caregiving duties at home, few fathers have workplace flexibility figured out. 59

Art

New Facial Details Surface Beneath a Rembrandt

Conservators at the Getty shed new light on an image hidden under “An Old Man in Military Costume.”

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Die Seite Drei
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Simbabwe hat nur noch 217 Dollar

dapd

Jahrelang hat Simbabwe mit großen, sehr großen Zahlen von sich reden gemacht. Nun hat das Land ein großes Problem mit einer zu kleinen Zahl: Es sind nur noch 217 US-Dollar in der Staatskasse.

Das Land mit rund zwölf Millionen Einwohnern geriet mit der Diktatur von Präsident Robert Mugabe und seinen widersinnigen Regierungsprogrammen in den 1990er Jahren in eine verheerende Wirtschaftskrise, die die Arbeitslosenquote auf schätzungsweise 80 Prozent in die Höhe trieb. Durch ungehemmtes Gelddrucken der Zentralbank folgte in den Jahren 2007 bis 2009 eine Hyperinflation, die in der Spitze die unglaubliche Inflationsrate von 90 Trilliarden Prozent erreichte.

In dieser Zeit brachte die Regierung eine Banknote mit dem Wert von 100 Billionen (100.000.000.000.000) heraus. Nach der Hyperinflation des ungarischen Pengö im Jahr 1946 unterlag der Zimbabwe-Dollar damit dem zweithöchsten Wertverfall einer Währung in der Geschichte.

Weil die Landeswährung damit jeglichen Sinn verloren hatte, erlaubte die Regierung im Jahr 2009 den Bürgern, auch ausländische Währungen wie den Euro, den US-Dollar und den Südafrikanischen Rand zu verwenden. Auch die Staatsdiener wurden in US-Dollar bezahlt.

Nun gibt es aber dieses neue Problem: Nachdem die Staatsdiener in der vergangenen Woche ausbezahlt wurden, verblieben nach Angabe von Finanzminister Tendai Biti nur noch 217 US-Dollar in der Staatskasse. “Die Staatsfinanzen sind derzeit gelähmt. Wir verfehlen unsere Ziele”, klagte der Minister bei einer Pressekonferenz. Die Regierung will sich nun an internationale Geldgeber wenden, weil für das Abhalten eines Verfassungsreferendums und von Wahlen 104 Millionen US-Dollar benötigt werden. Eine Aussage des Ministers, wie die Staatsangestellten im nächsten Monat bezahlt werden, ist nicht überliefert.

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The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Stocks Tumble on Weak Chinese Data

U.S. stocks tumbled Tuesday as fears about a slowdown in China’s economy deepened, illustrating how last week’s market volatility has not yet abated. 273

Investors Betting on More ECB Stimulus

Six months after the European Central Bank launched its blockbuster bond-buying program to rouse the region’s economy, some investors are betting that authorities will crank stimulus efforts even higher.

Analysis

Clashing Interests Hamstring EU Response to Crisis

Europe’s migrant struggle highlights the chasm between Europe’s principles and its ability to live up to them.

Greek Polls Suggest Tough Election Test for Tsipras

Opinion polls show declining support for Greece’s Syriza party and its leader, Alexis Tsipras. But Syriza retains a lead over its opponents and the Sept. 20 election could be tight.

EU Set to Extend Sanctions on Russians, Ukraine Rebels

The EU is set to roll over until mid-March sanctions targeted against almost 200 Russian and Ukrainian-separatist individuals and firms to keep pressure on Moscow to fully implement the Minsk cease-fire terms by year end.

China Imposes New Controls to Keep Money From Leaving Country

China is imposing fresh controls to prevent too much money from leaving the country, in an effort to keep funds at home.

Pope to Make It Easier for Priests to Grant Pardons for Abortion

Pope Francis will make it easier for priests to forgive women for having had abortions, and those who assisted, during a “year of mercy” starting Dec. 8. 523

Russian Airline Aeroflot to Take Control of Carrier Transaero

Russia’s largest airline, state-controlled Aeroflot, will take control of the country’s No. 2 carrier Transaero in a government-brokered deal to stave off bankruptcy at the heavily indebted company.

Apple’s Ian Rogers Is Going to LVMH

LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton has recruited Ian Rogers, a key executive from Apple, to spearhead the expansion of the luxury goods giant’s online retail presence.

‘Super-Sizing’ Natural Gas Output

Applying newer fracking techniques to a prolific natural-gas region that straddles Louisiana and Texas could give the U.S. more—and much cheaper—supplies of the fuel for many years.

U.S. Report Sees Economic Benefit in Allowing Oil Exports

Lifting the nation’s four-decade ban on oil exports wouldn’t raise gas prices and could help lower them, a government study concludes.

Bayer Separates Material Science Business

German pharmaceuticals group Bayer has moved a step closer to floating its $12.38 billion specialty chemicals business by legally and economically separating the unit, now named Covestro.

Heard on the Street

In a World Awash with Gas, Why Finding More is Good for Eni

Italy’s Eni has found a big gas field in Egypt. That highlights its strengths as the company also gets its financial house in order.

Service Providers See Gold in Shares of Startups

Branding firm Red Antler is among vendors that are looking to profit on the soaring valuations of young startups by taking payment in stock instead of cash.

Portuguese Central Bank Ends Talks With Anbang Over Novo Banco Sale

Portugal’s central bank will now enter talks with another bidder for the Portuguese bank created out of failed lender Banco Espírito Santo last year.

South African Gold Faces Uncertain Future

South Africa’s gold mining industry must undergo radical change to cope with falling prices, intensifying labor disputes and the surging cost of ever-deeper exploration.

Main Suspect in Bangkok Bombing Arrested

Thailand’s prime minister said security forces arrested a man whom they believe to be the primary suspect in the bombing of a shrine in Bangkok last month.

China’s World

In China’s Heartland, Small Cities Flourish

Fengdu on the Yangtze River is one of hundreds of smaller Chinese cities still bursting with consumer vitality. It’s if these striving cities lose momentum that China is in danger of failing, writes Andrew Browne.

Death Toll Rises After Ukraine Protest Blast

The death toll from Monday’s blast outside Ukraine’s parliament rose to three, and police said the man suspected of throwing a grenade was a volunteer fighter on leave from a unit fighting Russian-backed separatists.

Kentucky Clerk Defies High Court, Denies Gays Marriage Licenses

A county clerk in Kentucky who is defying the U.S. Supreme Court by refusing to license same-sex marriage has been summoned to explain to a federal judge why she shouldn’t face stiff fines or jail time. 947

Lebanese ‘YouStink’ Activists Occupy Minister’s Offices

Members of a grass-roots antigovernment movement occupied the offices of the environment minister in Beirut to press their demands for his resignation.

Technology

Russia Puts Off Data Showdown With Technology Firms

Facebook, Google and Twitter are among the U.S. companies that are getting more time to comply with a new law requiring Russian data centers.

Sports

Are You Good Enough to Be a Tennis Line Judge?

Watch a series of shots at full speed and decide whether each was in or out. Some will be traveling upwards of 100 miles per hour and you only get one chance to make the call. Good luck!

Soccer

FIFA May Weaken Its Executive Committee

The executive committee of FIFA, soccer’s world governing body, will be the first target of major reforms when the organization meets in Zurich next month.

Video

Hungary Stops Migrants Boarding Trains To Germany

1:46

Ukraine Protest Blast Kills Officer, Injures Dozens

0:45

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38