The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Stocks Tumble on Weak Chinese Data

U.S. stocks tumbled Tuesday after weak manufacturing data in China fueled investors’ worries about the world’s second-largest economy. 84

Hungary Clears Migrants From Train Station

Authorities on Tuesday cleared hundreds of people from the country’s main international railway station, prompting noisy protests by migrants who have crowded the building in a push to get to Austria and Germany. 89

Greek Polls Suggest Tough Election Test for Tsipras

Opinion polls show declining support for Greece’s Syriza party and its leader, Alexis Tsipras. But Syriza retains a lead over its opponents and the Sept. 20 election could be tight.

South African Gold Faces Uncertain Future

South Africa’s gold mining industry must undergo radical change to cope with falling prices, intensifying labor disputes and the surging cost of ever-deeper exploration.

China’s Economic Woes Echo Across Asia

Evidence is increasing that China’s economic slowdown is rippling across Asia, with a startling plunge in South Korean exports and softening manufacturing in Malaysia and Vietnam.

Pope Eases Way for Church to Forgive Abortion in ‘Year of Mercy’

Pope Francis will make it easier for the church to forgive women for having abortions, and those assisting, during a “year of mercy” starting Dec. 8. 169

U.K. Agrees to Change EU Referendum Question

The U.K. government has agreed to change the question in its planned referendum on EU membership after the country’s electoral watchdog said some people found the original wording was biased.

Apple’s Ian Rogers Is Going to LVMH

LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton has recruited Ian Rogers, a key executive from Apple, to spearhead the expansion of the luxury goods giant’s online retail presence.

U.S. Report Finds Economic Benefit in Allowing Oil Exports

A Obama administration study has concluded that lifting the nation’s four-decade ban on exports of U.S. oil wouldn’t raise gas prices and could help lower them.

Whirlpool Mulls Rival Bid for Oven-Maker AGA

Whirlpool has approached AGA Rangemaster, the iconic British maker of cast-iron ovens, over a possible cash bid, turning up the heat on Middleby Corp. which agreed in July to buy AGA for $198 million.

Iran Deal Could Open Door to Gulf Businesses

While executives in the Gulf see opportunities, the region’s governments remain at loggerheads on other issues.

Valeant Strikes Psoriasis-Drug Pact With AstraZeneca

Canada’s Valeant Pharmaceuticals has struck a deal with AstraZeneca of the U.K. to develop and sell psoriasis treatment brodalumab.

Heard on the Street

In a World Awash with Gas, Why Finding More is Good for Eni

Italy’s Eni has found a big gas field in Egypt. That highlights its strengths as the company also gets its financial house in order.

Service Providers See Gold in Shares of Startups

Branding firm Red Antler is among vendors that are looking to profit on the soaring valuations of young startups by taking payment in stock instead of cash.

Portuguese Central Bank Ends Talks With Anbang Over Novo Banco Sale

Portugal’s central bank will now enter talks with another bidder for the Portuguese bank created out of failed lender Banco Espírito Santo last year.

China Boosts Efforts to Keep Money at Home

China is imposing new controls to prevent too much money from leaving the country, with lenders beefing up internal checks on foreign-exchange conversions and regulators aiming to rein in illegal money-transfer agents.

Former Alabama Governor George Wallace ran as a third-party candidate in the 1968 presidential election and won five states.

Capital Journal

Sanders, Trump et al: Partying Like It’s 1968

Strange happenings are afoot in the 2016 presidential cycle, ones that draw parallels with 1968, when a disruptive race so shook up the political system that we’re still feeling its aftershocks today, Gerald F. Seib writes. 330

Main Suspect in Bangkok Bombing Arrested

Thailand’s prime minister said security forces arrested a man whom they believe to be the primary suspect in the bombing of a shrine in Bangkok last month.

China’s World

In China’s Heartland, Small Cities Flourish

Fengdu on the Yangtze River is one of hundreds of smaller Chinese cities still bursting with consumer vitality. It’s if these striving cities lose momentum that China is in danger of failing, writes Andrew Browne.

Kiev Death Toll Rises After Monday’s Clashes

The death toll from Monday’s blast outside Ukraine’s parliament has risen to three.

Lebanese ‘YouStink’ Activists Stage Sit-in

Dozens of protesters staged a sit-in outside the office of the environment minister in central Beirut, after he refused to meet demands to resign over uncollected trash piling up in the city streets.

Technology

Russia Puts Off Data Showdown With Technology Firms

Facebook, Google and Twitter are among the U.S. companies that are getting more time to comply with a new law requiring Russian data centers.

Sports

Are You Good Enough to Be a Tennis Line Judge?

Watch a series of shots at full speed and decide whether each was in or out. Some will be traveling upwards of 100 miles per hour and you only get one chance to make the call. Good luck!

Soccer

FIFA May Weaken Its Executive Committee

The executive committee of FIFA, soccer’s world governing body, will be the first target of major reforms when the organization meets in Zurich next month.

Video

Hungary Stops Migrants Boarding Trains To Germany

1:46

Ukraine Protest Blast Kills Officer, Injures Dozens

0:45

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

What to Watch for After Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is afflicting more people, and research shows patients who have had non-melanoma skin cancers are at increased risk of recurrence.

Art

New Facial Details Surface Beneath a Rembrandt

Conservators at the Getty shed new light on an image hidden under “An Old Man in Military Costume.”

IMAGE 1 of 12

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Polizei warnt: Apple Maps kann lebensgefährlich sein

Dass Apple Maps nicht zu den Geniestreichen des Konzerns gehört, ist hinlänglich bekannt. Doch die missratene Karten-Applikation kann sogar potenziell lebensbedrohlich sein, weshalb die australische Polizei nun eine offizielle Warnung ausgegeben hat. Mehrere Touristen mussten aus dem Niemandsland gerettet werden, weil sie auf die Navigation des iPhones setzten.

Wenn Apple in Deutschland halb Berlin mal eben in Schöneiche umbenennt, ist das was zum Schmunzeln. In einem wenig dicht besiedelten Gebiet wie dem rund um die australische Kleinstadt Mildura im Bundesstaat Victoria allerdings können spontane Verlegungen von Orten durch Apple Maps lebensgefährlich werden.

Apple Maps hat Mildura mitten in einen Nationalpark verlegt – und damit um ganze 70 Kilometer verschoben. Ein Mann irrte deshab 24 Stunden ohne Zugang zu Wasser und Nahrung umher – bei einer Temperatur von bis zu 46 Grad Celsius. Mindestens drei weitere Personen mussten von der Polizei gerettet werden. Deshalb hat die örtliche Polizei nun eine offizielle Warnung herausgebe, wie unter anderem der britische Guardian und mehrere Blogs berichten.

Mindestens vier Menschen haben sich auf diese Weise bereits verirrt, bestätigte die Polizei dem Guardian. Laut einem Bericht von ABC News waren es sogar sechs.

Die Warnung ist weniger witzig, als es zuerst scheinen mag. Für die Verirrten bestand teilweise Lebensgefahr. „Es gibt dort kein Wasser und Sie können im Sand steckenbleiben“, zitiert die britische ZeitungToby Prime, Reporter bei der lokalen Tageszeitung Sunraysia Daily. Sollte etwas Ähnliches in den USA passieren, könnten auf Apple teure Klagen zukommen, merkt der Guardian an.

Screenshot
Das australische Mildura befindet sich nicht, wie hier gezeigt, mitten in einem Nationalpark.

Spätestens mit diesem Fall sollte klar sein: Wer in Gebiete abseits der Zivilisation aufbricht, sollte sich niemals nur auf eine Navigationslösung verlassen. Allerdings hilft es auch nicht unbedingt, eine Alternative wie Nokia Here Maps oder Google Maps, das es derzeit nur als Web-Applikation für das aktuelle iPhone-System gibt, parallel zu nutzen. Viele Fehler tauchen nämlich gleich in mehreren Navigationslösungen auf.

Apple wollte sich zu dem Bericht nicht äußern. Apple-Chef Tim Cook hatte sich Ende September bei den Kunden für Apple Maps entschuldigt und auf Konkurrenten wie Google und Nokia verwiesen. In der Folge mussten zwei Apple-Mitarbeiter gehen, die für Apple Maps Verantwortung trugen: Top-Manager Scott Forstall  und Softwareentwickler Richard Williamson.

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Stocks Tumble on Weak Chinese Data

U.S. stocks tumbled Tuesday after weak manufacturing data in China fueled investors’ worries about the world’s second-largest economy. 84

Hungary Clears Migrants From Train Station

Authorities on Tuesday cleared hundreds of people from the country’s main international railway station, prompting noisy protests by migrants who have crowded the building in a push to get to Austria and Germany. 89

Greek Polls Suggest Tough Election Test for Tsipras

Opinion polls show declining support for Greece’s Syriza party and its leader, Alexis Tsipras. But Syriza retains a lead over its opponents and the Sept. 20 election could be tight.

South African Gold Faces Uncertain Future

South Africa’s gold mining industry must undergo radical change to cope with falling prices, intensifying labor disputes and the surging cost of ever-deeper exploration.

China’s Economic Woes Echo Across Asia

Evidence is increasing that China’s economic slowdown is rippling across Asia, with a startling plunge in South Korean exports and softening manufacturing in Malaysia and Vietnam.

Pope Eases Way for Church to Forgive Abortion in ‘Year of Mercy’

Pope Francis will make it easier for the church to forgive women for having abortions, and those assisting, during a “year of mercy” starting Dec. 8. 169

U.K. Agrees to Change EU Referendum Question

The U.K. government has agreed to change the question in its planned referendum on EU membership after the country’s electoral watchdog said some people found the original wording was biased.

Apple’s Ian Rogers Is Going to LVMH

LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton has recruited Ian Rogers, a key executive from Apple, to spearhead the expansion of the luxury goods giant’s online retail presence.

U.S. Report Finds Economic Benefit in Allowing Oil Exports

A Obama administration study has concluded that lifting the nation’s four-decade ban on exports of U.S. oil wouldn’t raise gas prices and could help lower them.

Whirlpool Mulls Rival Bid for Oven-Maker AGA

Whirlpool has approached AGA Rangemaster, the iconic British maker of cast-iron ovens, over a possible cash bid, turning up the heat on Middleby Corp. which agreed in July to buy AGA for $198 million.

Iran Deal Could Open Door to Gulf Businesses

While executives in the Gulf see opportunities, the region’s governments remain at loggerheads on other issues.

Valeant Strikes Psoriasis-Drug Pact With AstraZeneca

Canada’s Valeant Pharmaceuticals has struck a deal with AstraZeneca of the U.K. to develop and sell psoriasis treatment brodalumab.

Heard on the Street

In a World Awash with Gas, Why Finding More is Good for Eni

Italy’s Eni has found a big gas field in Egypt. That highlights its strengths as the company also gets its financial house in order.

Service Providers See Gold in Shares of Startups

Branding firm Red Antler is among vendors that are looking to profit on the soaring valuations of young startups by taking payment in stock instead of cash.

Portuguese Central Bank Ends Talks With Anbang Over Novo Banco Sale

Portugal’s central bank will now enter talks with another bidder for the Portuguese bank created out of failed lender Banco Espírito Santo last year.

China Boosts Efforts to Keep Money at Home

China is imposing new controls to prevent too much money from leaving the country, with lenders beefing up internal checks on foreign-exchange conversions and regulators aiming to rein in illegal money-transfer agents.

Former Alabama Governor George Wallace ran as a third-party candidate in the 1968 presidential election and won five states.

Capital Journal

Sanders, Trump et al: Partying Like It’s 1968

Strange happenings are afoot in the 2016 presidential cycle, ones that draw parallels with 1968, when a disruptive race so shook up the political system that we’re still feeling its aftershocks today, Gerald F. Seib writes. 330

Main Suspect in Bangkok Bombing Arrested

Thailand’s prime minister said security forces arrested a man whom they believe to be the primary suspect in the bombing of a shrine in Bangkok last month.

China’s World

In China’s Heartland, Small Cities Flourish

Fengdu on the Yangtze River is one of hundreds of smaller Chinese cities still bursting with consumer vitality. It’s if these striving cities lose momentum that China is in danger of failing, writes Andrew Browne.

Kiev Death Toll Rises After Monday’s Clashes

The death toll from Monday’s blast outside Ukraine’s parliament has risen to three.

Lebanese ‘YouStink’ Activists Stage Sit-in

Dozens of protesters staged a sit-in outside the office of the environment minister in central Beirut, after he refused to meet demands to resign over uncollected trash piling up in the city streets.

Technology

Russia Puts Off Data Showdown With Technology Firms

Facebook, Google and Twitter are among the U.S. companies that are getting more time to comply with a new law requiring Russian data centers.

Sports

Are You Good Enough to Be a Tennis Line Judge?

Watch a series of shots at full speed and decide whether each was in or out. Some will be traveling upwards of 100 miles per hour and you only get one chance to make the call. Good luck!

Soccer

FIFA May Weaken Its Executive Committee

The executive committee of FIFA, soccer’s world governing body, will be the first target of major reforms when the organization meets in Zurich next month.

Video

Hungary Stops Migrants Boarding Trains To Germany

1:46

Ukraine Protest Blast Kills Officer, Injures Dozens

0:45

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38