The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Austria Struggles to Identify Migrants’ Bodies

Veteran police investigators say they have never faced a task like identifying the 71 bodies of would-be refugees unloaded from the back of a truck found abandoned along a highway last week.

Apple’s Latest Challenge: Topping Its Own Success

Apple’s iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus reignited sales growth for the smartphone. But analysts predict muted growth for its latest models due out next week.

Chinese Navy Ships Operating in Bering Sea Off Alaska Coast

Five Chinese navy ships are currently operating in the Bering Sea, off the coast of Alaska, the first time the U.S. military has seen such activity in the area. 731

Capital Account

For Russia, Oil Collapse Has Soviet Echoes

For most countries, the economic slowdown in China and the accompanying slump in commodity prices represent something between nuisance and pothole. For Russia, they are a catastrophe, writes Greg Ip. 75

Inside Uber’s Fight With Its Chinese Nemesis

China’s multibillion-dollar ride-hailing market has erupted into a brawl between Uber and Beijing startup Didi Kuaidi.

Obama Locks in Votes to Secure Iran Nuclear Deal

President Barack Obama locked in enough support in Congress to ensure he can overcome bipartisan opposition and implement a landmark nuclear accord with Iran. 1804

U.S. Tech Firms Make Pilgrimage to Brussels

The giants of Silicon Valley are bulking up in the European Union’s de facto capital, hiring lobbyists and jostling for the favor of the Web’s most ambitious regulators.

South African Gold Faces Uncertain Future

South Africa’s gold mining industry must undergo radical change to cope with falling prices, intensifying labor disputes and the surging cost of ever-deeper exploration.

Small Firms Slow to Embrace Chip-Card System

Many small businesses aren’t racing to update their checkout systems ahead of an Oct. 1 shift that will put merchants on the hook for some fraudulent card charges.

Vivendi Earnings Rise

Vivendi SA on Wednesday reported a rise in second-quarter net profit, boosted by a windfall from the sale of its Brazilian telecom unit GVT to Telefónica SA.

Elves, Ninjas, Currency Power Lego Earnings

Lego said its 31% jump in first-half profit and 23% rise in revenue were fueled by strong sales of its Ninjago and Elves sets but also by the weakness of the Danish krone and the euro.

Private-Equity Firms Explore Bids for Petco

Private-equity firms are examining a possible purchase of Petco Holdings, the pet-store chain that filed to go public last month.

Asian Shares Rise; China Closed

Asian stocks rose after U.S. markets restored some stability. China markets are closed on Thursday and Friday for a holiday.

Giant U.S. Pension Fund to Propose Shift Away From Stocks, Bonds

The California State Teachers’ Retirement System, the nation’s second-largest pension fund, is considering a significant shift away from some stocks and bonds amid turbulent markets world-wide. 112

Malaysian Fund 1MDB Has Tens of Millions of Dollars Frozen

Swiss authorities said they had frozen funds worth tens of millions of dollars linked to 1Malaysia Development Berhad as part of an investigation into alleged corruption.

Gas Discovery in Egypt Troubles Israel

Israeli officials have expressed concern that the discovery of an extensive gas field off the coast of Egypt could upend Israeli development of its energy resources.

Environment

World Tree Count Climbs

There are slightly more than three trillion trees in the world, a figure that dwarfs previous estimates, according to the most comprehensive census yet of global forestation. 166

Masked Gunmen Kidnap 18 Turkish Workers in Baghdad

Identities of the gunmen in an early-morning raid on a sports stadium weren’t immediately known, as Turks in Iraq were seized for a second time in the past year.

At Least 22 Killed in Suicide Bombings at Mosque in Yemen

A pair of suicide bombings killed a least 22 people Wednesday at a mosque in San’a, just hours after a gunman killed two Red Cross workers.

Solitary Confinement Poses ‘Grave Problem,’ Study Says

Prisons are holding as many as 100,000 inmates in solitary confinement, a striking figure that poses a “grave problem” for the criminal justice system, according to a study. 53

Emails Point to Large Role for Clinton Adviser Blumenthal

Longtime aide Sidney Blumenthal maintained an outsize role with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, despite being blocked from taking a job at the department. 189

Biden’s Florida Trip Draws Campaign-Level Attention

Vice President Joe Biden received full-court national attention for an otherwise routine visit to Miami Dade College, with dozens of television cameras, photographers and reporters there to cover his 30 minutes of remarks.

Court Weighs Request to Immediately Stop Phone-Data Collection

An appeals court panel is considering whether to allow the government to continue the bulk collection of phone records during a six-month transition period until a new law kicks in prohibiting the controversial program.

Search Continues for Three Suspects After Illinois Policeman Killed

As a small northern Illinois community mourned a popular veteran police officer who was fatally shot while on duty, authorities scoured the area overnight in search of three men wanted in his slaying. 72

Video

Hungarian Police Struggle to Control Migrants

2:02

The Iran Nuclear Deal Explained

3:34

Uber Class-Action Lawsuit: What's at Stake

2:39

20 Odd Questions

Manolo Blahnik on Old Films and Kate Moss

The shoe designer on what he’d blow his money on, the drama behind Kate Moss’s wedding shoes and exactly how he feels about fake Manolos.

WSJ. Magazine

Robert Redford: From Sundance Kid to Hollywood Legend

The legendary actor is as busy as ever, with starring roles in the film adaptation of Bill Bryson’s ‘A Walk in the Woods’ and in the forthcoming drama, ‘Truth.’

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Diese Nachteile von Windows 8 sollten Sie kennen

Dass Microsoft mit Windows 8 die Oberfläche seines Betriebssystems radikal verändert hat, dürfte sich inzwischen herumgesprochen haben. Weniger bekannt ist allerdings unter anderem, was sich bei Lizenzen und Produktkeys ändern – mit weitreichenden Folgen für die Käufer.

1. Der Windows-Key hängt nun am Mainboard – mit allen Folgen

Hauptplatine kaputt – Lizenzschlüssel weg. So könnte man etwas verkürzt die neue Lizenzpolitik bei Windows 8 beschreiben. Ist Windows 8 nämlich auf einem PC vorinstalliert – eine sogenannte OEM-Version –, dann wird keiner der bekannten Aufkleber mit dem Code mehr mitgeliefert. Windows liest den Schlüssel einfach aus der Hardware aus.

Reuters
Microsoft-Chef Steve Ballmer während der Vorstellung von Windows 8 im November 2012 in Tel Aviv.

Vorteil für Microsoft: Eine Installation von Windows 8 auf weiteren Geräten sowie ein Gebrauchtverkauf der der Software wird verhindert. Portale wie Softwarebilliger.de hatten ein Geschäftsmodell daraus gemacht, gebrauchte Rechner in Massen aufzukaufen und die Software samt Lizenz-Key weiterzuverkaufen – legal, wie zuletzt der Europäische Gerichtshof in einem ähnlichen Fall entschieden hat.

Vorteil für den Kunden: Er muss den Lizenzschlüsel bei der Installation nicht mehr eingeben. Damit hat es sich jedoch auch mit den Vorteilen. Geht das Motherboard kaputt, ist damit auch der Schlüssel weg. Der Kunde ist nicht mehr frei, irgendein neues Mainboard zu kaufen, sondern muss das des ursprünglichen Herstellers nehmen. Gibt es das nicht mehr, hat der Kunde vermutlich Pech. Ebenso wird es komplizierter, wenn der Nutzer eine andere Windows-Version verwenden will als die mitgelieferte. Die Computerzeitschrift ct berichtet, dass dies nicht mit einer sauberen Neuinstallation möglich ist, sondern nur als Update von der vorinstallierten Version – was dann aber deutlich länger dauert als die normale Installation.

Nutzer können das alles durch das Ausführen eines kleines im Internet kursierenden Programms umgehen, das den Lizenzschlüssel ausliest – machen sich dann aber möglicherweise strafbar, schreiben die Rechtsanwälte Georg Mayer-Spasche und Marc Störing in der ct.

 

2. Es gibt wenig Gründe für Windows-Tablets

Microsofts Windows 8 gibt es in zwei Versionen für Tablets – und so richtig überzeugen können beide Varianten nicht. Tablets mit Windows RT sind vergleichbar mit dem iPad: Sie laufen wie der Marktführer von Apple auf einem stromsparenden ARM-Prozessor und können ebenso wie das iPad nur Software ausführen, die speziell für das Tablet geschrieben wurden – keine herkömmliche Windows-Software. Anders als beim iPad ist die Softwareauswahl bei Windows RT allerdings sehr begrenzt – und selbst Microsofts Office, das es für die RT-Variante von Windows in einer abgespeckten Variante gibt, wird es in Zukunft auch für das iPad geben.

Die andere Variante von Windows 8 für Tablets – ohne den Zusatz RT – ist dieselbe, die auch auf normalen PCs läuft. Der Vorteil: Diese Windows-Tablets, darunter das Surface Pro von Microsoft, können auch klassische PC-Software ausführen. Doch es zeichnet sich ab, dass diese Tablets andererseits kaum die Vorteile der Geräteklasse ausspielen können: Sie sind ähnlich teuer und schwer wie leichte Laptops und ihre Akkulaufzeit ist schwach.

Als Einstiegspreis nennt Microsoft für das kommende eigene Surface Pro einen Preis von 900 US-Dollar ohne Tastatur. Das Gerät soll 900 Gramm wiegen und ist damit – ohne Tastatur – schon nahe dran an Laptop-Leichtgewichten wie Apples Macbook Air, das mit 11-Zoll-Bildschirm etwa ein Kilogramm wiegt. Das Acer W700 soll 700 Euro kosten und das Samsung Ativ Smart PC Pro sogar 1300 Euro. In einer Nachricht auf Twitter ließ Microsoft durchblicken, dass das Surface Pro nur etwa die Hälfte der Akkulaufzeit des Surface mit ARM-Prozessor haben wird. Und selbst dessen Durchhaltevermögen ist mit sieben Stunden eher schlecht – ein iPad schafft rund zehn Stunden.

3. PC-Nutzer werden die neue Oberfläche überwiegend als Rückschritt empfinden

Microsofts Idee, ein System für Smartphones, Tablets und Desktop-PCs herauszubringen, erscheint auf den ersten Blick logisch – im Detail offenbaren sich aber viele Schwierigkeiten. So ist es auf Smartphones beispielsweise durchaus sinnvoll, Menüs vor dem Nutzer zu verbergen, wie es Windows 8 durch das Konzept der „Charms“ macht. Auf Tablets und gar PCs mit immer größeren Bildschirmen ist das jedoch ein Nachteil.

Der Usability-Experte Jakob Nielsen fand in Test heraus, dass viele seiner Probanden die Funktionen unter Windows 8 auch dann nicht aufriefen, wenn sie sich brauchten. Die Apps im neuen Gewand würden zudem viel weniger Informationen unterbringen als auf großen PC-Bildschirmen angemessen. Das vernichtende Fazit des Experten für Software-Design: Die neue Oberfläche sei „ein Monster, das arme Büroarbeiter terrorisiert und ihre Produktivität zerstört.“

4. Microsofts Windows verkauft sich gut – doch das ist nur die halbe Wahrheit

Windows 8 verkauft sich erstaunlich gut. In den ersten vier Wochen seit dem Verkaufsstart wurden laut der für Windows verantwortlichen Microsoft-Managerin Tami Reller 40 Millionen Lizenzen verkauft – mehr als im gleichen Zeitraum von Windows 7 im Jahre 2009. Eingerechnet sind dabei sowohl der Einzelverkauf als auch die Vorinstallation von OEM-Versionen auf PCs.

Dass sich das System so gut verkauft, dürfte vor allem an den aggressiven Rabattaktionen von Microsoft liegen. So bieten Mediamarkt und Saturn in ihren Filialen sogar die Pro-Version für nur 59 Euro an, als Download ist sie sogar für nur 29 Euro zu haben. Laut offizieller Preisliste sollte Windows 8 mindestens 279 Euro kosten.

Wie gut sich Windows 8 allerdings wirklich durchsetzt, wird erst ein Blick auf die Volumenlizenzen verraten, die an Unternehmen verkauft werden. Hierzu hat Microsoft bislang noch keine Auskunft gegeben. Bei Unternehmen wird angesichts des Bruchs mit der Windows-Tradition allergrößte Zurückhaltung gerechnet. Großkunden setzen immer noch überwiegend auf Windows XP von 2001, dessen Support in 15 Monaten wieder einmal auslaufen soll. Microsoft hatte die Frist schon mehrfach nach hinten geschoben. Erst langfristig wird sich zeigen, ob Unternehmen auf Windows 8  oder lieber mit dem Vorgänger Windows 7 auf ein Betriebssystem in der klassischen Windows-Tradition setzen.

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Austria Struggles to Identify Migrants’ Bodies

Veteran police investigators say they have never faced a task like identifying the 71 bodies of would-be refugees unloaded from the back of a truck found abandoned along a highway last week.

Apple’s Latest Challenge: Topping Its Own Success

Apple’s iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus reignited sales growth for the smartphone. But analysts predict muted growth for its latest models due out next week.

Chinese Navy Ships Operating in Bering Sea Off Alaska Coast

Five Chinese navy ships are currently operating in the Bering Sea, off the coast of Alaska, the first time the U.S. military has seen such activity in the area. 725

Capital Account

For Russia, Oil Collapse Has Soviet Echoes

For most countries, the economic slowdown in China and the accompanying slump in commodity prices represent something between nuisance and pothole. For Russia, they are a catastrophe, writes Greg Ip. 74

Inside Uber’s Fight With Its Chinese Nemesis

China’s multibillion-dollar ride-hailing market has erupted into a brawl between Uber and Beijing startup Didi Kuaidi.

Obama Locks in Votes to Secure Iran Nuclear Deal

President Barack Obama locked in enough support in Congress to ensure he can overcome bipartisan opposition and implement a landmark nuclear accord with Iran. 1801

U.S. Tech Firms Make Pilgrimage to Brussels

The giants of Silicon Valley are bulking up in the European Union’s de facto capital, hiring lobbyists and jostling for the favor of the Web’s most ambitious regulators.

South African Gold Faces Uncertain Future

South Africa’s gold mining industry must undergo radical change to cope with falling prices, intensifying labor disputes and the surging cost of ever-deeper exploration.

Small Firms Slow to Embrace Chip-Card System

Many small businesses aren’t racing to update their checkout systems ahead of an Oct. 1 shift that will put merchants on the hook for some fraudulent card charges.

Vivendi Earnings Rise

Vivendi SA on Wednesday reported a rise in second-quarter net profit, boosted by a windfall from the sale of its Brazilian telecom unit GVT to Telefónica SA.

Elves, Ninjas, Currency Power Lego Earnings

Lego said its 31% jump in first-half profit and 23% rise in revenue were fueled by strong sales of its Ninjago and Elves sets but also by the weakness of the Danish krone and the euro.

Private-Equity Firms Explore Bids for Petco

Private-equity firms are examining a possible purchase of Petco Holdings, the pet-store chain that filed to go public last month.

Asian Shares Rise; China Closed

Asian stocks rose after U.S. markets restored some stability. China markets are closed on Thursday and Friday for a holiday.

Giant U.S. Pension Fund to Propose Shift Away From Stocks, Bonds

The California State Teachers’ Retirement System, the nation’s second-largest pension fund, is considering a significant shift away from some stocks and bonds amid turbulent markets world-wide. 110

Malaysian Fund 1MDB Has Tens of Millions of Dollars Frozen

Swiss authorities said they had frozen funds worth tens of millions of dollars linked to 1Malaysia Development Berhad as part of an investigation into alleged corruption.

Gas Discovery in Egypt Troubles Israel

Israeli officials have expressed concern that the discovery of an extensive gas field off the coast of Egypt could upend Israeli development of its energy resources.

Environment

World Tree Count Climbs

There are slightly more than three trillion trees in the world, a figure that dwarfs previous estimates, according to the most comprehensive census yet of global forestation. 165

Masked Gunmen Kidnap 18 Turkish Workers in Baghdad

Identities of the gunmen in an early-morning raid on a sports stadium weren’t immediately known, as Turks in Iraq were seized for a second time in the past year.

At Least 22 Killed in Suicide Bombings at Mosque in Yemen

A pair of suicide bombings killed a least 22 people Wednesday at a mosque in San’a, just hours after a gunman killed two Red Cross workers.

Solitary Confinement Poses ‘Grave Problem,’ Study Says

Prisons are holding as many as 100,000 inmates in solitary confinement, a striking figure that poses a “grave problem” for the criminal justice system, according to a study. 53

Emails Point to Large Role for Clinton Adviser Blumenthal

Longtime aide Sidney Blumenthal maintained an outsize role with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, despite being blocked from taking a job at the department. 189

Biden’s Florida Trip Draws Campaign-Level Attention

Vice President Joe Biden received full-court national attention for an otherwise routine visit to Miami Dade College, with dozens of television cameras, photographers and reporters there to cover his 30 minutes of remarks.

Court Weighs Request to Immediately Stop Phone-Data Collection

An appeals court panel is considering whether to allow the government to continue the bulk collection of phone records during a six-month transition period until a new law kicks in prohibiting the controversial program.

Search Continues for Three Suspects After Illinois Policeman Killed

As a small northern Illinois community mourned a popular veteran police officer who was fatally shot while on duty, authorities scoured the area overnight in search of three men wanted in his slaying. 72

Video

Hungarian Police Struggle to Control Migrants

2:02

The Iran Nuclear Deal Explained

3:34

Uber Class-Action Lawsuit: What's at Stake

2:39