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Four Men to Face Charges Over Migrant Deaths

A Hungarian court said four men could face up to 16 years in prison for alleged people trafficking in connection with the deaths of 71 migrants found in a midsize truck abandoned in neighboring Austria.

EU Considers Substantial Fund for Africa Over Migrants

The EU is discussing offering a “substantial” fund to African countries as an incentive for greater cooperation on the region’s growing migration crisis, Luxembourg Foreign Minister Jean Asselborn said on Saturday.

Egyptian Court Sentences Al Jazeera Journalists

An Egyptian judge sentenced a trio of Al Jazeera English journalists to three years in prison, prompting fresh criticism of the government’s clampdown on press and political freedoms.

Thousands March Against Lebanon Government

A demonstration in Beirut against poor waste management blossomed into full-throated demands that Lebanon’s long-standing political class step down from power.

Turkey Bombs Islamic State Targets in Syria as Part of U.S.-Led Coalition

Turkish jets bombed Islamic State targets in Syria under the umbrella of the U.S.-led international coalition for the first time, the country’s government said, as Turkey expands its fight against the extremist group.

Stock Swings Don’t Shake Investors

Stock indexes’ wildest week in years rattled investors and fueled expectations for further price swings, but it failed to squelch the belief U.S. markets remain the best place to put money.

Foreign Man Arrested in Bangkok Blast Probe

Thai police said they arrested a foreign man whom they described as a suspect in this month’s deadly bombing of a Bangkok shrine that is popular with Chinese tourists.

France, Germany Warn Putin on Ukraine Separatist Elections

Leaders of France and Germany told Russian President Vladimir Putin that rebel-run elections conducted in the separatist-controlled regions of Ukraine would endanger the so-called Minsk peace process.

Rice to Press Pakistan on Antiterror Vigilance

National security adviser Susan Rice is set to arrive in Pakistan on Sunday to press the country’s government to do more to prevent terrorists from using its territory as a base for attacks on neighboring states.

Treading Line Between War and Peace, U.S. Special Forces Groom Afghan Troops

The U.S. military allowed The Wall Street Journal to visit a variety of commando units, offering a glimpse into what may be the last fighting season of America’s longest war. 64

Thousands Protest Against Malaysia’s Najib Razak

Police said an estimated 25,000 people demonstrated in the capital, protesting management of the economy and debt problems at a state investment fund.

Tropical Storm Erika Weakens

Tropical storm Erika was losing its punch as it drenched Haiti and the Dominican Republic early Saturday, after killing at least 20 people and leaving another 31 missing on the small eastern Caribbean island of Dominica.

Buying the Dips Doesn’t Work for Everyone

The old strategy of buying the dips may not work for everyone. In fact, for some people, it could be disastrous, writes Jason Zweig.

How Do You Short China?

Traders are scouring stock, bond and currency markets for ways to make money on the malaise afflicting China. Some are piling into insurance-like contracts that would pay out if the country defaulted on a small pool of its foreign-denominated bonds.

Myanmar Buzz Fades for Many U.S. Investors

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A ‘Black Swan’ Fund Made $1 Billion This Week

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Inmarsat Says Russian Proton Rocket Puts Satellite Into Orbit

Inmarsat declared the launch of a Russian Proton rocket carrying one of its satellites a success after the rocket delivered its cargo into its initial orbit position.

China’s Moves Won’t Help U.S. Tech Firms

China’s moves to spur its slowing economy are having an important but less obvious effect on the tech sector: Strengthening local companies that already were making life difficult for U.S. rivals.

European Refiners’ Profit Revival Faces End

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Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Apples Lisa: 30 Jahre Rechner mit der Maus

dapd
Lisa-Heimcomputer von Apple aus dem Jahre 1983.
Von dapd

Sie wurde verlacht, verspottet und schließlich in der Wüste verschrottet: Am 3. Januar vor 30 Jahren brachte Apple seine Lisa auf den Markt. Es war der erste massentaugliche Computer mit grafischer Benutzeroberfläche – und einer Maus.

Damit konnten erstmals auch Menschen Computer bedienen, die keine kryptischen Programmiersprachen beherrschen, wie der Kurator des nach eigenen Angaben größten Computermuseums der Welt in Paderborn, Michael Mikolajczak, sagt. Apple-Gründer Steve Jobs erkannte sofort das Potenzial dieser neuen Technik.

Allerdings war Lisa kein Verkaufsschlager – was sicher auch am stolzen Preis von zunächst 9.995 Dollar für das neuartige Gerät gelegen habe, sagt Mikolajczak. Später senkte Apple den Preis zwar auf zunächst 6.000 und später 3.000 Dollar. Es half nichts, Lisa blieb ein Ladenhüter. Keine 60.000 Stück gingen nach Schätzungen von US-Behörden weltweit über die Ladentheken.

Steve Jobs wurde auf Computer mit Maus aufmerksam

Ein weiterer Grund für den schlechten Absatz war die schon sprichwörtlich schwache Leistung. 1983, als der Computer auf den Markt kam, seien “Knock, knock”-Witze unter Computer-Pionieren populär geworden, erinnert sich Mikolajczak. “Man klopfte an die Tür, wartete ein paar Minuten und freute sich dann: Lisa ist da!” Mit einem fünf Megahertz starken Prozessor, einem Megabyte Arbeits-und fünf Megabyte Festplattenspeicher reagierte Lisa sehr behäbig auf Eingaben – und wurde so zum Synonym für Langsamkeit.

“Vielleicht wollte Steve Jobs zu schnell zu viel”, sagt Mikolajczak über den Misserfolg von damals. Der 2011 gestorbene Apple-Mitgründer war 1979 in einem Forschungslabor auf den Xerox Alto aufmerksam geworden. Dieser hatte als weltweit erster Rechner eine Maus und eine grafische Benutzeroberfläche – kam allerdings nicht in Serie auf den Massenmarkt.

Die ersten Ideen für die revolutionäre Bedienhilfe hatte der Erfinder Douglas C. Engelbarth bereits über zehn Jahre vor der Markteinführung von Lisa, wie Mikolajczak sagt. “Die waren noch aus Holz gebaut.” 1968 präsentierte Engelbarth seine erste Maus schließlich dem Fachpublikum. Zunächst gab es aber zu wenige Computer mit grafischer Benutzeroberfläche.

Verdrängt der Touchscreen die Maus?

Jobs habe sofort das wirtschaftliche Potenzial des Xerox-Computers erkannt und seine Entwickler angetrieben, etwas Ähnliches zu entwerfen. Allen Mahnungen zum Trotz äußerte er immer neue Wünsche für Lisa, die die Ingenieure auch verwirklichten - was den Preis allerdings auf knapp 10.000 Dollar trieb. “Jobs glaubte schon damals, dass ein Computer zum täglichen Leben dazugehören sollte”, sagt Mikolajczak.

Der Computer-Visionär erkannte, dass sich die Geräte dazu aber verändern mussten. Wenn Computer massentauglich werden sollten, brauchten sie ein besseres Design und eine einfachere Bedienung.

Lisas Ende in der Wüste

Lisa wurde schon 1985 bereits nach drei Jahren wieder vom Markt genommen, erklärt Mikolajczak. “Die Restbestände kaufte eine Entsorgungsfirma auf und verschredderte sie in der Wüste von Utah.” Heute gebe es nur noch wenige Geräte – trotzdem rissen sich die Sammler aber nicht um Lisa. “Sie war zu erfolglos”, sagt der Kurator.

Im Heinz-Nixdorf-Museumsforum in Paderborn stehe Lisa zwischen weitaus erfolgreicheren Apple-Produkten, sagt Mikolajczak. Trotz ihres Misserfolgs traten Maus und grafische Benutzeroberfläche aber ab Mitte der 80er Jahre einen Siegeszug an. Inzwischen wurden weltweit Milliarden Mäuse verkauft. Sie machten etwa Microsoft mit seinem Windows-Betriebssystem zum Weltmarktführer.

Derweil arbeiten die Branchengrößen längst daran, ihr Erfolgsmodell wieder überflüssig zu machen. Bildschirme, die direkt auf Berührung reagieren und ohne extra Zeigegerät auskommen, sind eben noch einfacher zu bedienen.

Eine Übersicht über die Geschichte der Apple-Produkte in Bildern finden Sie hier: Apples Innovationen.

 

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Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Four Men to Face Charges Over Migrant Deaths

A Hungarian court said four men could face up to 16 years in prison for alleged people trafficking in connection with the deaths of 71 migrants found in a midsize truck abandoned in neighboring Austria.

EU Considers Substantial Fund for Africa Over Migrants

The EU is discussing offering a “substantial” fund to African countries as an incentive for greater cooperation on the region’s growing migration crisis, Luxembourg Foreign Minister Jean Asselborn said on Saturday.

Egyptian Court Sentences Al Jazeera Journalists

An Egyptian judge sentenced a trio of Al Jazeera English journalists to three years in prison, prompting fresh criticism of the government’s clampdown on press and political freedoms.

Thousands March Against Lebanon Government

A demonstration in Beirut against poor waste management blossomed into full-throated demands that Lebanon’s long-standing political class step down from power.

Turkey Bombs Islamic State Targets in Syria as Part of U.S.-Led Coalition

Turkish jets bombed Islamic State targets in Syria under the umbrella of the U.S.-led international coalition for the first time, the country’s government said, as Turkey expands its fight against the extremist group.

Stock Swings Don’t Shake Investors

Stock indexes’ wildest week in years rattled investors and fueled expectations for further price swings, but it failed to squelch the belief U.S. markets remain the best place to put money.

Foreign Man Arrested in Bangkok Blast Probe

Thai police said they arrested a foreign man whom they described as a suspect in this month’s deadly bombing of a Bangkok shrine that is popular with Chinese tourists.

France, Germany Warn Putin on Ukraine Separatist Elections

Leaders of France and Germany told Russian President Vladimir Putin that rebel-run elections conducted in the separatist-controlled regions of Ukraine would endanger the so-called Minsk peace process.

Rice to Press Pakistan on Antiterror Vigilance

National security adviser Susan Rice is set to arrive in Pakistan on Sunday to press the country’s government to do more to prevent terrorists from using its territory as a base for attacks on neighboring states.

Treading Line Between War and Peace, U.S. Special Forces Groom Afghan Troops

The U.S. military allowed The Wall Street Journal to visit a variety of commando units, offering a glimpse into what may be the last fighting season of America’s longest war. 64

Thousands Protest Against Malaysia’s Najib Razak

Police said an estimated 25,000 people demonstrated in the capital, protesting management of the economy and debt problems at a state investment fund.

Tropical Storm Erika Weakens

Tropical storm Erika was losing its punch as it drenched Haiti and the Dominican Republic early Saturday, after killing at least 20 people and leaving another 31 missing on the small eastern Caribbean island of Dominica.

Buying the Dips Doesn’t Work for Everyone

The old strategy of buying the dips may not work for everyone. In fact, for some people, it could be disastrous, writes Jason Zweig.

How Do You Short China?

Traders are scouring stock, bond and currency markets for ways to make money on the malaise afflicting China. Some are piling into insurance-like contracts that would pay out if the country defaulted on a small pool of its foreign-denominated bonds.

Myanmar Buzz Fades for Many U.S. Investors

Disenchantment with the business climate, especially among American companies, comes as concerns are spreading about Myanmar’s political future.

A ‘Black Swan’ Fund Made $1 Billion This Week

Universa Hedge Fund, a well-known ‘black swan’ fund, made more than $1 billion in profits in one week amid volatility.

Inmarsat Says Russian Proton Rocket Puts Satellite Into Orbit

Inmarsat declared the launch of a Russian Proton rocket carrying one of its satellites a success after the rocket delivered its cargo into its initial orbit position.

China’s Moves Won’t Help U.S. Tech Firms

China’s moves to spur its slowing economy are having an important but less obvious effect on the tech sector: Strengthening local companies that already were making life difficult for U.S. rivals.

European Refiners’ Profit Revival Faces End

Europe’s biggest energy companies have enjoyed a revival of refinery profits, but that run may be winding down even as oil prices slump.

Tesla Wants Obama Administration to Press China

Tesla Motors wants the Obama administration to talk to Xi Jinping about making it easier for auto makers to do business in China during the Chinese president’s visit to the U.S.

U.S.

Biden, Clinton Backers Try to Lock Down Support

Many Democratic activists said they want to see Vice President Joe Biden jump into the 2016 presidential race, as his supporters and Hillary Clinton’s campaign work to lock down commitments from party leaders.

Review

Historically Speaking

A History of Star-Crossed Lovers

Lovers separated by cruel circumstance have played a role in history and literature for millennia. Amanda Foreman looks at Berenice and Titus, Abelard and Heloise and more

Essay

The Lessons of Out-of-Body Experiences

Powerful, unnerving hallucinations show there’s something malleable about the way our brains construct our sense of self.

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09