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EU Ministers Push for Action on Migrant Crisis

Germany, France and the U.K. pushed for a faster response in dealing with the continent’s migration crisis as Hungarian police detained a fifth person in connection with the deaths of 71 migrants found in a truck in Austria.

Striking Workers Block French Port

The labor dispute is preventing travelers from boarding ferries on both sides of the English Channel.

Meet the Private Watchdogs Policing Finance

The use of outside monitors to police financial institutions that have misbehaved has exploded in recent years, sometimes generating friction.

Fed Appears to Hold Line on Rate Plan

Federal Reserve officials emerged from a week of head-spinning financial turbulence largely sticking to their plan to raise U.S. interest rates before the end of the year.

Crises Put First Dents in Xi Jinping’s Power

Before a planned visit to the U.S., the Chinese president’s image as a bold leader is being undermined by his botched handling of the stock market rout and the country’s economic slowdown.

VW Is Told to Shed Suzuki Stake

An international court has ordered Volkswagen of Germany to sell its nearly 20% stake in Suzuki, allowing the Japanese auto maker to extricate itself from the tie-up after a four-year struggle.

Eni Reports Huge Natural-Gas Discovery off Egypt

Eni SpA said it made a massive natural-gas discovery off the coast of Egypt in what the Italian oil-and-gas company is calling the largest ever find in the Mediterranean Sea.

U.A.E. Takes Lead in Southern Yemen

U.A.E. forces prevented Houthi rebels in Yemen from overrunning the Yemeni port city of Aden and now also reluctantly find themselves in the business of nation-building.

At Least 11 Die in Saudi Arabia Fire

A large fire at a residential compound of Saudi Arabia’s state-owned oil giant killed at least 11 people and injured more than 200, officials said. The cause of the fire was unknown.

Thousands Without Power After British Columbia Storm

Emergency crews were working to clean up in the aftermath of a vicious windstorm that tore through southwestern British Columbia, leaving an estimated 500,000 people without electricity.

Egypt Rejects Criticism of Journalists’ Jail Sentences

Egypt’s foreign ministry rejected international criticism of a court’s decision to sentence a team of Al Jazeera journalists to three years in prison, summoning the British ambassador to Egypt for condemning the verdict.

Judges to Weigh California’s Death Penalty

A federal appeals court in Pasadena, Calif., will hear arguments over whether California’s death penalty violates the Constitution, the latest flash point in a nationwide debate about states’ capital punishment systems.

Hip-hop producer Irv “Gotti” Lorenzo, center, is seen in 2007. He calls himself a Signature Bank customer for life after the bank stood by him when he was facing money-laundering charges.

Hip-hop producer Irv “Gotti” Lorenzo, center, is seen in 2007. He calls himself a Signature Bank customer for life after the bank stood by him when he was facing money-laundering charges.

The Only Bank This Hip-Hop Mogul Will Use

Low-profile Signature Bank has become one of the nation’s fastest-growing lenders, attracting a fan base ranging from hip-hop mogul Irv “Gotti” Lorenzo to former Congressman Barney Frank

Buying the Dips Doesn’t Work for Everyone

The old strategy of buying the dips may not work for everyone. In fact, for some people, it could be disastrous, writes Jason Zweig.

BNY Mellon’s Pricing Problems Persist

Executives at Bank of New York Mellon Corp. are racing against the clock to make it through a backlog of pricing issues before the markets open Monday morning.

Lawyer’s Offstage Acts Threaten Record Pact

When federal agents showed up at Keila Ravelo’s home three days before Christmas, they kicked off a chain of events that could send her to prison and scuttle the biggest antitrust settlement in U.S. history.

Alibaba Targets Rural China for E-Commerce Growth

China e-commerce titans Alibaba and JD.com, facing a slowdown in the growth of their core urban customers, are battling to crack a new frontier: the sprawling countryside with some 600 million potential shoppers.

Suppliers Feel Pain as Coal Miners Struggle

As big coal miners struggle, their equipment suppliers—thousands of businesses sprinkled throughout Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky—are scrambling to find new customers anywhere they can. 75

Ageas to Sell Hong Kong Life Insurance Business

Belgian insurance company Ageas said Sunday it will sell its Hong Kong Life insurance business to Chinese asset-management firm JD Capital for €1.23 billion.

Inmarsat Says Russian Proton Rocket Puts Satellite Into Orbit

Inmarsat declared the launch of a Russian Proton rocket carrying one of its satellites a success after the rocket delivered its cargo into its initial orbit position.

Technology

Apple’s Ad Blockers Rile Publishers

Apple’s move to make it easier to block ads on iPhones and iPads is troubling publishers and heightening tensions with its Silicon Valley neighbors like Google.

Arts

IMAGE 1 of 12

Video Music Awards 2015

Taylor Swift wins best pop music video for “Blank Space,” and Bruno Mars and Mark Ronson take the award for best male video for “Uptown Funk.” Swift and Nicki Minaj also bury their beef by joining forces onstage at MTV’s 32 annual ceremony.

Obituary

Les Misérables Actor Kyle Jean-Baptiste Dies

Twenty-one-year-old actor was first black man to play the lead role of Jean Valjean on Broadway.

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09

Style & Fashion

Phone Cases: The New It Fashion Accessory?

Over the past few years, the iPhone case has gone from pragmatic protector to style statement. One writer plays catch up.

Music

Foals’ ‘What Went Down’ Is a Visceral Confessional

Yannis Philippakis, the lead singer whose energetic stage presence and novelistic lyrics have made Foals one of British rock’s most compelling propositions, talks about the band’s fourth album.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Wer hat das Netbook getötet?

Die beiden größten Netbook-Hersteller Acer und Asus produzieren die kleinen und günstigen Laptops seit dem 1. Januar 2013 nicht mehr, berichtet die Digitimes.

Der britische Guardian geht der Frage nach, wer das Netbook getötet hat. Die Tatverdächtigen: Apples iPad und andere Tablets, die Konkurrenz des PC-Marktes, die globale wirtschaftliche Entwicklung und die wirtschaftlichen Rahmenbedingungen, unter denen die Netbooks hergestellt wurden. Die von Intel 2012 eingeführte Klasse der Ultrabooks hat ein Alibi: Die neuen besonders schnellen, flachen, leichten und teuren Laptops zielen mit ihrem Preis auf einen ganz anderen Markt und sind darüber hinaus viel zu erfolglos, als dass sie den Netbooks hätten gefährlich werden können.

Tablets haben Netbooks überrundet

Klar ist: Seit im April 2010 Apples iPad auf den Markt kam, hat es die gesamte PC-Branche aufgewirbelt. Im Februar 2012 überrundeten die Tablets die Netbooks bei den verkauften Stückzahlen. Doch das allein ist noch nicht ausschlaggebend. Vielmehr konnte der Netbook-Markt aufgrund der geringen Preise und Margen kaum Druck aushalten. Netbooks konnten nur ein Massengeschäft sein, keine Nische – in welche die Geräte durch mehrere Faktoren gedrängt wurden.

Insbesondere, nachdem klar wurde, dass viele Käufer das vertraute Betriebssystem Windows statt Linux bevorzugten, wurden die Margen immer geringer, weil die Hersteller nun auch noch für eine Windows-Lizenz an Microsoft zahlen mussten. Dass der PC-Markt insgesamt vor allem durch die gesamtwirtschaftliche Entwicklung ab 2010 geschwächt wurde, kam erschwerend hinzu.

Der taiwanesische Hersteller Asus, mit vollem Namen eigentlich Asustek, hatte die besonders kleinen, billigen und leistungsschwachen Laptops 2007 mit dem EeePC eingeführt. Damals war das mit Linux ausgestattete Gerät für einen revolutionären Preis zu haben: 200 Dollar in den USA, in Deutschland kam es ein Jahr später zu einem höheren Preis auf den Markt.

Der EeePC und seine Nachahmer waren die ersten Massen-PCs mit Solid State Drives (SSD) – schneller Flash-Speicher, der als Festplattenersatz dient und heute immer häufiger zur Standard-Ausstattung jedes PCs gehört. Auf ein optisches Laufwerk zum Abspielen von CDs, DVDs und Blu-rays wurde – wie bei den später eingeführten teuren Ultrabooks – aus Platz- und Gewichtsgründen verzichtet.

Schnell aber wurde das Konzept auch verwässert: Geräte mit Festplatte statt SSD kamen auf den Markt und die meisten Netbooks sind heute mit Windows XP oder Windows 7 ausgestattet und nicht mehr mit Linux. Was bei allen Netbooks gleich geblieben ist: Sie alle sind klein – der Bildschirm ist meist um die 10 Zoll groß – und sie alle sind mit einem Atom-Prozessor von Intel ausgestattet – ein besonders leistungsschwaches Modell von Intel, das auf das Stromsparen optimiert ist.

Margen zu gering für einen Nischenmarkt

„Netbooks hatten ein kurzes aber interessantes Leben“, schreibt der Guardian. „Sie entwickelten sich vom einstigen Retter der PC-Industrie zu nur einem weiteren falsch bepreisten Versuch, um stromsparende Intel-Chips voranzubringen und mehr Geld für Microsoft einzusammeln.“ Letztlich war der Preisunterschied zu den besser ausgestatteten Laptops nicht mehr groß genug und gleichzeitig die Marge für die Hersteller zu gering, um einen Nischenmarkt zu rechtfertigen.

Pionier Asus hatte für Ende 2012 das Ende der Eee-PC-Produktion angekündigt und auch Acer will aus dem Geschäft aussteigen, was die Taiwanesen im Gespräch mit dem Wall Street Journal im Herbst noch dementierten. Asus und Acer waren die einzigen beiden verbliebenen Netbook-Hersteller, nachdem sich zuvor unter anderem schon Samsung, HP und Dell aus dem Markt zurückgezogen hatten.

Meine mobile digitale Schreibmaschine bleibt

Ich persönlich bin mit meinem Eee-PC 1000H immer noch zufrieden. Für mich ist das Gerät perfekt als „mobile Schreibmaschine“ mit Internetzugang, wenn ich unterwegs bin. Wenn ich auf Außenterminen schnell etwas mitschreiben will, ist eine Tastatur unterlässlich – mein iPad kann da nicht mithalten. Als das Gerät nach zahlreichen Windows-Updates all zu langsam wurde, habe ich das Betriebssystem Windws XP durch Linux Mint ersetzt. Seit dem bin ich wieder rundum zufrieden mit meinem Netbook – auch wenn die Geräteklasse inzwischen tot ist.

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    • [...] Der vielleicht wichtigste strukturelle Grund, der gegen ein Comeback des PCs spricht, ist die Tatsache, dass die Branche an Absatzzahlen gemessen wird, die in einer Zeit entstanden, in denen Netbook-Laptops boomten – Geräte, die für sehr wenig Geld verkauft wurden aber bei der Leistung Abstriche machten. Das Netbook hat deutlich an Popularität eingebüßt. [...]

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

EU Ministers Push for Action on Migrant Crisis

Germany, France and the U.K. pushed for a faster response in dealing with the continent’s migration crisis as Hungarian police detained a fifth person in connection with the deaths of 71 migrants found in a truck in Austria.

Striking Workers Block French Port

The labor dispute is preventing travelers from boarding ferries on both sides of the English Channel.

Meet the Private Watchdogs Policing Finance

The use of outside monitors to police financial institutions that have misbehaved has exploded in recent years, sometimes generating friction.

Fed Appears to Hold Line on Rate Plan

Federal Reserve officials emerged from a week of head-spinning financial turbulence largely sticking to their plan to raise U.S. interest rates before the end of the year.

Crises Put First Dents in Xi Jinping’s Power

Before a planned visit to the U.S., the Chinese president’s image as a bold leader is being undermined by his botched handling of the stock market rout and the country’s economic slowdown.

VW Is Told to Shed Suzuki Stake

An international court has ordered Volkswagen of Germany to sell its nearly 20% stake in Suzuki, allowing the Japanese auto maker to extricate itself from the tie-up after a four-year struggle.

Eni Reports Huge Natural-Gas Discovery off Egypt

Eni SpA said it made a massive natural-gas discovery off the coast of Egypt in what the Italian oil-and-gas company is calling the largest ever find in the Mediterranean Sea.

U.A.E. Takes Lead in Southern Yemen

U.A.E. forces prevented Houthi rebels in Yemen from overrunning the Yemeni port city of Aden and now also reluctantly find themselves in the business of nation-building.

At Least 11 Die in Saudi Arabia Fire

A large fire at a residential compound of Saudi Arabia’s state-owned oil giant killed at least 11 people and injured more than 200, officials said. The cause of the fire was unknown.

Thousands Without Power After British Columbia Storm

Emergency crews were working to clean up in the aftermath of a vicious windstorm that tore through southwestern British Columbia, leaving an estimated 500,000 people without electricity.

Egypt Rejects Criticism of Journalists’ Jail Sentences

Egypt’s foreign ministry rejected international criticism of a court’s decision to sentence a team of Al Jazeera journalists to three years in prison, summoning the British ambassador to Egypt for condemning the verdict.

Judges to Weigh California’s Death Penalty

A federal appeals court in Pasadena, Calif., will hear arguments over whether California’s death penalty violates the Constitution, the latest flash point in a nationwide debate about states’ capital punishment systems.

Hip-hop producer Irv “Gotti” Lorenzo, center, is seen in 2007. He calls himself a Signature Bank customer for life after the bank stood by him when he was facing money-laundering charges.

Hip-hop producer Irv “Gotti” Lorenzo, center, is seen in 2007. He calls himself a Signature Bank customer for life after the bank stood by him when he was facing money-laundering charges.

The Only Bank This Hip-Hop Mogul Will Use

Low-profile Signature Bank has become one of the nation’s fastest-growing lenders, attracting a fan base ranging from hip-hop mogul Irv “Gotti” Lorenzo to former Congressman Barney Frank

Buying the Dips Doesn’t Work for Everyone

The old strategy of buying the dips may not work for everyone. In fact, for some people, it could be disastrous, writes Jason Zweig.

BNY Mellon’s Pricing Problems Persist

Executives at Bank of New York Mellon Corp. are racing against the clock to make it through a backlog of pricing issues before the markets open Monday morning.

Lawyer’s Offstage Acts Threaten Record Pact

When federal agents showed up at Keila Ravelo’s home three days before Christmas, they kicked off a chain of events that could send her to prison and scuttle the biggest antitrust settlement in U.S. history.

Alibaba Targets Rural China for E-Commerce Growth

China e-commerce titans Alibaba and JD.com, facing a slowdown in the growth of their core urban customers, are battling to crack a new frontier: the sprawling countryside with some 600 million potential shoppers.

Suppliers Feel Pain as Coal Miners Struggle

As big coal miners struggle, their equipment suppliers—thousands of businesses sprinkled throughout Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky—are scrambling to find new customers anywhere they can. 75

Ageas to Sell Hong Kong Life Insurance Business

Belgian insurance company Ageas said Sunday it will sell its Hong Kong Life insurance business to Chinese asset-management firm JD Capital for €1.23 billion.

Inmarsat Says Russian Proton Rocket Puts Satellite Into Orbit

Inmarsat declared the launch of a Russian Proton rocket carrying one of its satellites a success after the rocket delivered its cargo into its initial orbit position.

Technology

Apple’s Ad Blockers Rile Publishers

Apple’s move to make it easier to block ads on iPhones and iPads is troubling publishers and heightening tensions with its Silicon Valley neighbors like Google.

Arts

IMAGE 1 of 12

Video Music Awards 2015

Taylor Swift wins best pop music video for “Blank Space,” and Bruno Mars and Mark Ronson take the award for best male video for “Uptown Funk.” Swift and Nicki Minaj also bury their beef by joining forces onstage at MTV’s 32 annual ceremony.

Obituary

Les Misérables Actor Kyle Jean-Baptiste Dies

Twenty-one-year-old actor was first black man to play the lead role of Jean Valjean on Broadway.

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09