The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

ECB Leaves Interest Rates Unchanged

The European Central Bank left its interest rates unchanged at record lows as a sluggish eurozone economy and persistently weak inflation have raised hopes that the ECB will eventually beef up its stimulus programs.

Syrians Take Arctic Route to Europe

More than 150 refugees have entered Norway from Arctic Russia this year—a fraction of the estimated half-million people who have sought asylum in Europe, but the flow is quickening as Syrians share the tip for a cheaper and safer route.

Hungary’s Leader Says Migrant Crisis Is Germany’s Problem

Hundreds of migrants rushed trains at Hungary’s main international station as the country’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban blamed Germany for Europe’s migration crisis and warned that border-free travel within the bloc is at risk.

Global Markets Bounce Back

Stocks around the world extended gains as investors looked for signals of how central banks will contend with upheaval in financial markets.

China to Slim Down Military

Xi Jinping announced a reduction of 300,000 troops to China’s armed forces, part of a series of reforms to strengthen a military striving to assert increasingly global interests.

Europe File

Tsipras Moves Greece Past Austerity Debate

Greeks can now have a conventional political debate on the choices needed to hit its bailout targets.

Inside Uber’s Fight With Its Chinese Nemesis

China’s multibillion-dollar ride-hailing market has erupted into a brawl between Uber and Beijing startup Didi Kuaidi.

Vivendi Chairman Ousts Longtime Chief of Canal Plus

French billionaire and Vivendi Chairman Vincent Bolloré has ousted the longtime chief of Canal Plus, further tightening his grip over the Vivendi-owned pay-TV group amid falling subscriber numbers.

Syngenta Moves to Calm Disappointed Shareholders

Syngenta moved to appease shareholders angered by its rejection of a takeover from Monsanto, saying it will divest its global vegetables seeds business and return more than $2 billion to shareholders.

Soda, Health Officials Duke It Out

The soda industry is playing a never-ending game of Whac-A-Mole with health officials and anti-obesity campaigns in cities across the country. When it beats down critics in one place, they pop up in another.

Natalie Massenet Leaves Net-a-Porter

The founder and executive chairman of Net-a-Porter has abruptly resigned, leaving the high-end fashion site ahead of its pending merger with Yoox.

Small Firms Slow to Embrace Chip-Card System

Many small businesses aren’t racing to update their checkout systems ahead of an Oct. 1 shift that will put merchants on the hook for some fraudulent card charges.

Foreign Firms Feel China’s Chill

Market turmoil and Beijing’s crackdown on brokers and investors is complicating the plans of foreign funds and investment banks that had bet on bigger business in China.

Devaluation Strengthens China’s Hand at IMF

Beijing’s careful management of its currency since its devaluation last month is bolstering China’s bid to get the yuan included in the IMF’s basket of reserve currencies as soon as November.

Credit-Card Fraudsters Pump Gas Stations for Profit

A delay in guidelines encouraging gas stations to upgrade their equipment leaves them more vulnerable to credit-card fraud than other sectors.

As motorists head out on the last big driving weekend of the summer, the credit-card industry and gas-station owners are deploying everything from sophisticated software to heavy-duty padlocks to combat an epidemic of fuel-related theft and fraud.

Krom River Closes Commodity Hedge Fund

Commodity hedge fund Krom River, which managed around $1 billion at its peak, is returning money to investors as it plans a shift in focus following a tough period for commodities funds.

World Tree Count Climbs

There are slightly more than three trillion trees in the world, a figure that dwarfs previous estimates, according to the most comprehensive census yet of global forestation. 175

French Farmers Stage Paris Tractor Protest

Farmers converged on Paris, blocking streets in the east of the city with more than 1,000 tractors and gathering at the National Assembly to protest against high costs and low food prices.

Gas Discovery in Egypt Troubles Israel

Israeli officials have expressed concern that the discovery of an extensive gas field off the coast of Egypt could upend Israeli development of its energy resources.

Masked Gunmen Kidnap 18 Turkish Workers in Baghdad

Identities of the gunmen in an early-morning raid on a sports stadium weren’t immediately known, as Turks in Iraq were seized for a second time in the past year.

Obama Locks in Votes to Secure Iran Nuclear Deal

President Barack Obama locked in enough support in Congress to ensure he can overcome bipartisan opposition and implement a landmark nuclear accord with Iran. 1839

Solitary Confinement Poses ‘Grave Problem,’ Study Says

Prisons are holding as many as 100,000 inmates in solitary confinement, a striking figure that poses a “grave problem” for the criminal justice system, according to a study. 57

Emails Point to Large Role for Clinton Adviser Blumenthal

Longtime aide Sidney Blumenthal maintained an outsize role with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, despite being blocked from taking a job at the department. 189

Court Weighs Request to Immediately Stop Phone-Data Collection

An appeals court panel is considering whether to allow the government to continue the bulk collection of phone records during a six-month transition period until a new law kicks in prohibiting the controversial program.

Biden’s Florida Trip Draws Campaign-Level Attention

Vice President Joe Biden received full-court national attention for an otherwise routine visit to Miami Dade College, with dozens of television cameras, photographers and reporters there to cover his 30 minutes of remarks.

Video

Suicide Bombings at Yemen Mosque Kill at Least 22

1:20

Hungarian Police Struggle to Control Migrants

2:02

The Iran Nuclear Deal Explained

3:34

20 Odd Questions

Manolo Blahnik on Old Films and Kate Moss

The shoe designer on what he’d blow his money on, the drama behind Kate Moss’s wedding shoes and exactly how he feels about fake Manolos.

A Modigliani Painting for $100 Million?

Christie’s International said it expects to ask roughly $100 million for a Modigliani nude that will be auctioned this fall, a bold reflection of how prices for blue-chip paintings have skyrocketed in recent seasons.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Wer hat das Netbook getötet?

Die beiden größten Netbook-Hersteller Acer und Asus produzieren die kleinen und günstigen Laptops seit dem 1. Januar 2013 nicht mehr, berichtet die Digitimes.

Der britische Guardian geht der Frage nach, wer das Netbook getötet hat. Die Tatverdächtigen: Apples iPad und andere Tablets, die Konkurrenz des PC-Marktes, die globale wirtschaftliche Entwicklung und die wirtschaftlichen Rahmenbedingungen, unter denen die Netbooks hergestellt wurden. Die von Intel 2012 eingeführte Klasse der Ultrabooks hat ein Alibi: Die neuen besonders schnellen, flachen, leichten und teuren Laptops zielen mit ihrem Preis auf einen ganz anderen Markt und sind darüber hinaus viel zu erfolglos, als dass sie den Netbooks hätten gefährlich werden können.

Tablets haben Netbooks überrundet

Klar ist: Seit im April 2010 Apples iPad auf den Markt kam, hat es die gesamte PC-Branche aufgewirbelt. Im Februar 2012 überrundeten die Tablets die Netbooks bei den verkauften Stückzahlen. Doch das allein ist noch nicht ausschlaggebend. Vielmehr konnte der Netbook-Markt aufgrund der geringen Preise und Margen kaum Druck aushalten. Netbooks konnten nur ein Massengeschäft sein, keine Nische – in welche die Geräte durch mehrere Faktoren gedrängt wurden.

Insbesondere, nachdem klar wurde, dass viele Käufer das vertraute Betriebssystem Windows statt Linux bevorzugten, wurden die Margen immer geringer, weil die Hersteller nun auch noch für eine Windows-Lizenz an Microsoft zahlen mussten. Dass der PC-Markt insgesamt vor allem durch die gesamtwirtschaftliche Entwicklung ab 2010 geschwächt wurde, kam erschwerend hinzu.

Der taiwanesische Hersteller Asus, mit vollem Namen eigentlich Asustek, hatte die besonders kleinen, billigen und leistungsschwachen Laptops 2007 mit dem EeePC eingeführt. Damals war das mit Linux ausgestattete Gerät für einen revolutionären Preis zu haben: 200 Dollar in den USA, in Deutschland kam es ein Jahr später zu einem höheren Preis auf den Markt.

Der EeePC und seine Nachahmer waren die ersten Massen-PCs mit Solid State Drives (SSD) – schneller Flash-Speicher, der als Festplattenersatz dient und heute immer häufiger zur Standard-Ausstattung jedes PCs gehört. Auf ein optisches Laufwerk zum Abspielen von CDs, DVDs und Blu-rays wurde – wie bei den später eingeführten teuren Ultrabooks – aus Platz- und Gewichtsgründen verzichtet.

Schnell aber wurde das Konzept auch verwässert: Geräte mit Festplatte statt SSD kamen auf den Markt und die meisten Netbooks sind heute mit Windows XP oder Windows 7 ausgestattet und nicht mehr mit Linux. Was bei allen Netbooks gleich geblieben ist: Sie alle sind klein – der Bildschirm ist meist um die 10 Zoll groß – und sie alle sind mit einem Atom-Prozessor von Intel ausgestattet – ein besonders leistungsschwaches Modell von Intel, das auf das Stromsparen optimiert ist.

Margen zu gering für einen Nischenmarkt

„Netbooks hatten ein kurzes aber interessantes Leben“, schreibt der Guardian. „Sie entwickelten sich vom einstigen Retter der PC-Industrie zu nur einem weiteren falsch bepreisten Versuch, um stromsparende Intel-Chips voranzubringen und mehr Geld für Microsoft einzusammeln.“ Letztlich war der Preisunterschied zu den besser ausgestatteten Laptops nicht mehr groß genug und gleichzeitig die Marge für die Hersteller zu gering, um einen Nischenmarkt zu rechtfertigen.

Pionier Asus hatte für Ende 2012 das Ende der Eee-PC-Produktion angekündigt und auch Acer will aus dem Geschäft aussteigen, was die Taiwanesen im Gespräch mit dem Wall Street Journal im Herbst noch dementierten. Asus und Acer waren die einzigen beiden verbliebenen Netbook-Hersteller, nachdem sich zuvor unter anderem schon Samsung, HP und Dell aus dem Markt zurückgezogen hatten.

Meine mobile digitale Schreibmaschine bleibt

Ich persönlich bin mit meinem Eee-PC 1000H immer noch zufrieden. Für mich ist das Gerät perfekt als „mobile Schreibmaschine“ mit Internetzugang, wenn ich unterwegs bin. Wenn ich auf Außenterminen schnell etwas mitschreiben will, ist eine Tastatur unterlässlich – mein iPad kann da nicht mithalten. Als das Gerät nach zahlreichen Windows-Updates all zu langsam wurde, habe ich das Betriebssystem Windws XP durch Linux Mint ersetzt. Seit dem bin ich wieder rundum zufrieden mit meinem Netbook – auch wenn die Geräteklasse inzwischen tot ist.

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Kommentare (1 aus 1)

Alle Kommentare »
    • [...] Der vielleicht wichtigste strukturelle Grund, der gegen ein Comeback des PCs spricht, ist die Tatsache, dass die Branche an Absatzzahlen gemessen wird, die in einer Zeit entstanden, in denen Netbook-Laptops boomten – Geräte, die für sehr wenig Geld verkauft wurden aber bei der Leistung Abstriche machten. Das Netbook hat deutlich an Popularität eingebüßt. [...]

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

ECB Leaves Interest Rates Unchanged

The European Central Bank left its interest rates unchanged at record lows as a sluggish eurozone economy and persistently weak inflation have raised hopes that the ECB will eventually beef up its stimulus programs.

Syrians Take Arctic Route to Europe

More than 150 refugees have entered Norway from Arctic Russia this year—a fraction of the estimated half-million people who have sought asylum in Europe, but the flow is quickening as Syrians share the tip for a cheaper and safer route.

Hungary’s Leader Says Migrant Crisis Is Germany’s Problem

Hundreds of migrants rushed trains at Hungary’s main international station as the country’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban blamed Germany for Europe’s migration crisis and warned that border-free travel within the bloc is at risk.

Global Markets Bounce Back

Stocks around the world extended gains as investors looked for signals of how central banks will contend with upheaval in financial markets.

China to Slim Down Military

Xi Jinping announced a reduction of 300,000 troops to China’s armed forces, part of a series of reforms to strengthen a military striving to assert increasingly global interests.

Europe File

Tsipras Moves Greece Past Austerity Debate

Greeks can now have a conventional political debate on the choices needed to hit its bailout targets.

Inside Uber’s Fight With Its Chinese Nemesis

China’s multibillion-dollar ride-hailing market has erupted into a brawl between Uber and Beijing startup Didi Kuaidi.

Vivendi Chairman Ousts Longtime Chief of Canal Plus

French billionaire and Vivendi Chairman Vincent Bolloré has ousted the longtime chief of Canal Plus, further tightening his grip over the Vivendi-owned pay-TV group amid falling subscriber numbers.

Syngenta Moves to Calm Disappointed Shareholders

Syngenta moved to appease shareholders angered by its rejection of a takeover from Monsanto, saying it will divest its global vegetables seeds business and return more than $2 billion to shareholders.

Soda, Health Officials Duke It Out

The soda industry is playing a never-ending game of Whac-A-Mole with health officials and anti-obesity campaigns in cities across the country. When it beats down critics in one place, they pop up in another.

Natalie Massenet Leaves Net-a-Porter

The founder and executive chairman of Net-a-Porter has abruptly resigned, leaving the high-end fashion site ahead of its pending merger with Yoox.

Small Firms Slow to Embrace Chip-Card System

Many small businesses aren’t racing to update their checkout systems ahead of an Oct. 1 shift that will put merchants on the hook for some fraudulent card charges.

Foreign Firms Feel China’s Chill

Market turmoil and Beijing’s crackdown on brokers and investors is complicating the plans of foreign funds and investment banks that had bet on bigger business in China.

Devaluation Strengthens China’s Hand at IMF

Beijing’s careful management of its currency since its devaluation last month is bolstering China’s bid to get the yuan included in the IMF’s basket of reserve currencies as soon as November.

Credit-Card Fraudsters Pump Gas Stations for Profit

A delay in guidelines encouraging gas stations to upgrade their equipment leaves them more vulnerable to credit-card fraud than other sectors.

As motorists head out on the last big driving weekend of the summer, the credit-card industry and gas-station owners are deploying everything from sophisticated software to heavy-duty padlocks to combat an epidemic of fuel-related theft and fraud.

Krom River Closes Commodity Hedge Fund

Commodity hedge fund Krom River, which managed around $1 billion at its peak, is returning money to investors as it plans a shift in focus following a tough period for commodities funds.

World Tree Count Climbs

There are slightly more than three trillion trees in the world, a figure that dwarfs previous estimates, according to the most comprehensive census yet of global forestation. 175

French Farmers Stage Paris Tractor Protest

Farmers converged on Paris, blocking streets in the east of the city with more than 1,000 tractors and gathering at the National Assembly to protest against high costs and low food prices.

Gas Discovery in Egypt Troubles Israel

Israeli officials have expressed concern that the discovery of an extensive gas field off the coast of Egypt could upend Israeli development of its energy resources.

Masked Gunmen Kidnap 18 Turkish Workers in Baghdad

Identities of the gunmen in an early-morning raid on a sports stadium weren’t immediately known, as Turks in Iraq were seized for a second time in the past year.

Obama Locks in Votes to Secure Iran Nuclear Deal

President Barack Obama locked in enough support in Congress to ensure he can overcome bipartisan opposition and implement a landmark nuclear accord with Iran. 1842

Solitary Confinement Poses ‘Grave Problem,’ Study Says

Prisons are holding as many as 100,000 inmates in solitary confinement, a striking figure that poses a “grave problem” for the criminal justice system, according to a study. 57

Emails Point to Large Role for Clinton Adviser Blumenthal

Longtime aide Sidney Blumenthal maintained an outsize role with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, despite being blocked from taking a job at the department. 189

Court Weighs Request to Immediately Stop Phone-Data Collection

An appeals court panel is considering whether to allow the government to continue the bulk collection of phone records during a six-month transition period until a new law kicks in prohibiting the controversial program.

Biden’s Florida Trip Draws Campaign-Level Attention

Vice President Joe Biden received full-court national attention for an otherwise routine visit to Miami Dade College, with dozens of television cameras, photographers and reporters there to cover his 30 minutes of remarks.

Video

Suicide Bombings at Yemen Mosque Kill at Least 22

1:20

Hungarian Police Struggle to Control Migrants

2:02

The Iran Nuclear Deal Explained

3:34