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China Fears Sink Markets Again

U.S. stocks plunged Tuesday amid new evidence that China’s stubborn economic slowdown is damaging global commerce.

Investors Betting on More ECB Stimulus

Six months after the European Central Bank launched its blockbuster bond-buying program to rouse the region’s economy, some investors are betting that authorities will crank stimulus efforts even higher.

Analysis

Clashing Interests Hamstring EU Response to Crisis

Europe’s migrant struggle highlights the chasm between Europe’s principles and its ability to live up to them.

Conglomerate Honeywell Finds Love Amid the Breakups

Investors have rewarded Honeywell, even as other conglomerates have been pressured to tighten their focus.

Greek Polls Suggest Tough Election Test for Tsipras

Opinion polls show declining support for Greece’s Syriza party and its leader, Alexis Tsipras. But Syriza retains a lead over its opponents and the Sept. 20 election could be tight.

China Imposes New Controls to Keep Money From Leaving Country

China is imposing fresh controls to prevent too much money from leaving the country, in an effort to keep funds at home.

EU Set to Extend Sanctions on Russians, Ukraine Rebels

The EU is set to roll over until mid-March sanctions targeted against almost 200 Russian and Ukrainian-separatist individuals and firms to keep pressure on Moscow to fully implement the Minsk cease-fire terms by year end.

Russian Airline Aeroflot to Take Control of Carrier Transaero

Russia’s largest airline, state-controlled Aeroflot, will take control of the country’s No. 2 carrier Transaero in a government-brokered deal to stave off bankruptcy at the heavily indebted company.

Uber Drivers’ Suit Granted Class-Action Status

A federal judge has granted class-action status to a lawsuit claiming Uber Technologies treats its drivers like employees without providing health benefits and paying for expenses normally covered by an employer. 98

‘Super-Sizing’ Natural Gas Output

Applying newer fracking techniques to a prolific natural-gas region that straddles Louisiana and Texas could give the U.S. more—and much cheaper—supplies of the fuel for many years.

Amgen to Help Develop Novartis’s Pipeline of Alzheimer’s Drugs

Novartis AG will share the risks and rewards as Amgen Inc. will help develop its pipeline of experimental Alzheimer’s disease drugs.

Bayer Separates Material Science Business

German pharmaceuticals group Bayer has moved a step closer to floating its $12.3 billion specialty chemicals business by ‘legally and economically’ separating the unit, now named Covestro.

The Moment When Humans Matter

A string of messy market openings in recent weeks has reinvigorated a debate about the relative effectiveness of humans in the stock trade.

FHA Offers Olive Branch to Hesitant Lenders

The government is trying to coax banks back to making mortgage loans to risky borrowers, after a string of expensive disputes over a federal loan program led some banks to conclude it wasn’t worth the headaches.

Heard on the Street

In a World Awash with Gas, Why Finding More is Good for Eni

Italy’s Eni has found a big gas field in Egypt. That highlights its strengths as the company also gets its financial house in order.

Portuguese Central Bank Ends Talks With Anbang Over Novo Banco Sale

Portugal’s central bank will now enter talks with another bidder for the Portuguese bank created out of failed lender Banco Espírito Santo last year.

Death Toll Rises After Ukraine Protest Blast

The death toll from Monday’s blast outside Ukraine’s parliament rose to three, and police said the man suspected of throwing a grenade was a volunteer fighter on leave from a unit fighting Russian-backed separatists.

Main Suspect in Bangkok Bombing Arrested

Thailand’s prime minister said security forces arrested a man whom they believe to be the primary suspect in the bombing of a shrine in Bangkok last month.

China’s World

Flourishing Cities Offer Beijing a Lesson in Thinking Small

Fengdu on the Yangtze River is one of hundreds of smaller Chinese cities still bursting with consumer vitality. It’s if these striving cities lose momentum that China is in danger of failing, writes Andrew Browne.

Emails Point to Large Role for Clinton Adviser

Longtime aide Sidney Blumenthal maintained an outsize role with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, despite being blocked from taking a job at the department. 59

Lebanese ‘YouStink’ Activists Occupy Minister’s Offices

Members of a grass-roots antigovernment movement occupied the offices of the environment minister in Beirut to press their demands for his resignation.

Russia Puts Off Data Showdown With Technology Firms

Facebook, Google and Twitter are among the U.S. companies that are getting more time to comply with a new law requiring Russian data centers.

Personal Tech | DxO One Review

Finally, an iPhone Camera Good Enough for a Pro

The DxO One is a tiny attachment offering a big upgrade to your iPhone camera. Geoffrey A. Fowler reviews.

Review

Thermal Cameras Reveal an Unseen World

With the Seek Compact and Flir One cameras, little $250 accessories for iPhones and Android phones give you “Predator” vision.

Intel Bets New Chips Will Revive PC Sales

Intel is overhauling its flagship line of computer chips, in a high-stakes bid to revive personal-computer sales.

Video

Hungary Stops Migrants Boarding Trains To Germany

1:46

Ukraine Protest Blast Kills Officer, Injures Dozens

0:45

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Management

Dealing With ‘Daddy Track’: Men Face Challenges Going Part Time

As women make strides in the workplace and men shoulder more caregiving duties at home, few fathers have workplace flexibility figured out. 64

Art

New Facial Details Surface Beneath a Rembrandt

Conservators at the Getty shed new light on an image hidden under “An Old Man in Military Costume.”

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Adobe verschenkt Photoshop ohne es zu wollen

Screenshot Adobe

Adobe stellt sein Profi-Grafiksoftware-Paket Creative Suit  per Gratis-Download zur Verfügung – zumindest in der Version CS 2 von 2005. Das Software-Paket kostete damals mehr als 2.000 Euro. Das Angebot richtet sich an Altkunden, welche die Software gekauft haben, wie Adobe in einem Foren-Beitrag klarstellt. Demnach gab es technische Probleme mit den Aktivierungsservern, die daher am 13. Dezember deaktiviert wurden.

Um den Kunden der sieben Jahre alten Software die Nutzung dennoch zu ermöglichen, werden spezielle Seriennummern samt Download-Links zur Verfügung gestellt. Die Software richtete sich aber nicht an die Allgemeinheit. Nachdem zahlreiche Tech-Portale, darunter auch WSJ Tech, über den Gratis-Download berichteten, schaltete Adobe die Seite vorübergehend ab. Inzwischen funktionieren die Download-Links aber wieder.

Für Windows und alte Versionen von Mac OS X stehen die Creative Suit 2 kostenlos inklusive Seriennummer zum Download bereit – auch in einer deutschsprachigen Version. Voraussetzung ist lediglich, dass sich der Nutzer per kostenloser Registrierung auf der Website eine Adobe-ID anlegt. Eine Überprüfung, ob der Kunde die Software wirklich gekauft hat, findet nicht statt. Danach stehen Adobes wichtigste Werkzeuge für Profi-Grafiker in der fünf Jahre alten Variante zur Verfügung. Kurz nachdem über den Download berichtet wurde, schienen die Server aufgrund des Ansturms überlastet zu sein.

Auch wenn CS2 offiziell nur Windows 2000 und Windows XP unterstützt, läuft die Software Berichten zufolge auch unter Windows 7, selbst in der 64-Bit-Variante. Damit dürfte sie auch auf dem aktuellen Windows 8 lauffähig sein. Heise Online berichtet allerdings von Problemen unter Windows 7 mit den RAW-Dateien von Digitalkameras.

Die nicht mehr ganz frische Software läuft auf Apples aktuellen Intel-Rechnern nicht mehr – Voraussetzung ist  Mac OS X 10.2.8 bis 10.3.8 mit den Prozessoren PowerPC G4 oder G5. Apples Rechner hatten vor dem Wechsel auf Intel-Prozessoren eine Prozessoren mit der PowerPC-Architektur genutzt, die von heutigen Versionen des Betriebssystems Mac OS X nicht mehr simuliert werden kann. Möglich ist der Betrieb auf aktuellen Macs mit Intel-Prozessoren nur mit einer PowerPC-Emulation, welche Apple nur bis zur Version Snow Leopard ins System eingebaut hatte – nicht mehr in die Nachfolgeversionen Lion und Mountain Lion.

Das Paket umfasst Adobe Photoshop, das weltweit bekannteste Programm zum Bearbeiten von Fotos und anderen Bildern, sowie Acrobat Standard 7.0 zum Erzeugen von PDF-Dokumenten, das PDF-Konvertierungsprogramm Acrobat Pro 8.0, den HTML-Editor Audition 3.0 GoLive CS2, das Vektorgrafikenprogramm Illustrator CS2,  die professionelle Textverarbeitung InCopy CS2, das Layout- und Satzprogramm InDesign CS2 und die Filmbearbeitungssoftware Adobe Premiere Pro 2.0. Auch die abgespeckte Photoshop-Varianten Elements 4.0 und 5.0 sind verfügbar.

Die Programme können jeweils einzeln als Installationsarchiv heruntergeladen werden, die dazugehörige Seriennummer steht direkt neben dem Download.

Update 19:32 Uhr: Auf der Adobe-Download-Seite ist nur noch eine Fehlermeldung zu sehen. Adobe reagierte nicht auf eine Bitte um Stellungnahme.

Update vom 8. Januar, 9:34 Uhr: Offenbar will Adobe die Software nicht allen Anwendern zur Verfügung stellen, sondern nur Kunden, welche die Software bereits gekauft hatten, geht aus einem Foren-Beitrag von Adobe hervor. Demnach gab es technische Probleme mit einem Aktivierungsserver. Um den Kunden dennoch die Nutzung der sieben Jahre alten Software zu ermöglichen, wurden dazu spezielle Seriennummer samt Download zur Verfügung gestellt. Der Download-Link wurde unterdessen wieder aktiviert. Der Artikel wurde entsprechend überarbeitet.

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    • [...] morgen habe ich dann in einem Tweet von Florian Bühler einen interessanten Link zum Blog des WSJ entdeckt und dadurch erfahren, dass die frei zugänglichen Serials kein Geschenk sind, sondern für echte [...]

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

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The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

China Fears Sink Markets Again

U.S. stocks plunged Tuesday amid new evidence that China’s stubborn economic slowdown is damaging global commerce.

Investors Betting on More ECB Stimulus

Six months after the European Central Bank launched its blockbuster bond-buying program to rouse the region’s economy, some investors are betting that authorities will crank stimulus efforts even higher.

Analysis

Clashing Interests Hamstring EU Response to Crisis

Europe’s migrant struggle highlights the chasm between Europe’s principles and its ability to live up to them.

Conglomerate Honeywell Finds Love Amid the Breakups

Investors have rewarded Honeywell, even as other conglomerates have been pressured to tighten their focus.

Greek Polls Suggest Tough Election Test for Tsipras

Opinion polls show declining support for Greece’s Syriza party and its leader, Alexis Tsipras. But Syriza retains a lead over its opponents and the Sept. 20 election could be tight.

China Imposes New Controls to Keep Money From Leaving Country

China is imposing fresh controls to prevent too much money from leaving the country, in an effort to keep funds at home.

EU Set to Extend Sanctions on Russians, Ukraine Rebels

The EU is set to roll over until mid-March sanctions targeted against almost 200 Russian and Ukrainian-separatist individuals and firms to keep pressure on Moscow to fully implement the Minsk cease-fire terms by year end.

Russian Airline Aeroflot to Take Control of Carrier Transaero

Russia’s largest airline, state-controlled Aeroflot, will take control of the country’s No. 2 carrier Transaero in a government-brokered deal to stave off bankruptcy at the heavily indebted company.

Uber Drivers’ Suit Granted Class-Action Status

A federal judge has granted class-action status to a lawsuit claiming Uber Technologies treats its drivers like employees without providing health benefits and paying for expenses normally covered by an employer. 99

‘Super-Sizing’ Natural Gas Output

Applying newer fracking techniques to a prolific natural-gas region that straddles Louisiana and Texas could give the U.S. more—and much cheaper—supplies of the fuel for many years.

Amgen to Help Develop Novartis’s Pipeline of Alzheimer’s Drugs

Novartis AG will share the risks and rewards as Amgen Inc. will help develop its pipeline of experimental Alzheimer’s disease drugs.

Bayer Separates Material Science Business

German pharmaceuticals group Bayer has moved a step closer to floating its $12.3 billion specialty chemicals business by ‘legally and economically’ separating the unit, now named Covestro.

The Moment When Humans Matter

A string of messy market openings in recent weeks has reinvigorated a debate about the relative effectiveness of humans in the stock trade.

FHA Offers Olive Branch to Hesitant Lenders

The government is trying to coax banks back to making mortgage loans to risky borrowers, after a string of expensive disputes over a federal loan program led some banks to conclude it wasn’t worth the headaches.

Heard on the Street

In a World Awash with Gas, Why Finding More is Good for Eni

Italy’s Eni has found a big gas field in Egypt. That highlights its strengths as the company also gets its financial house in order.

Portuguese Central Bank Ends Talks With Anbang Over Novo Banco Sale

Portugal’s central bank will now enter talks with another bidder for the Portuguese bank created out of failed lender Banco Espírito Santo last year.

Death Toll Rises After Ukraine Protest Blast

The death toll from Monday’s blast outside Ukraine’s parliament rose to three, and police said the man suspected of throwing a grenade was a volunteer fighter on leave from a unit fighting Russian-backed separatists.

Main Suspect in Bangkok Bombing Arrested

Thailand’s prime minister said security forces arrested a man whom they believe to be the primary suspect in the bombing of a shrine in Bangkok last month.

China’s World

Flourishing Cities Offer Beijing a Lesson in Thinking Small

Fengdu on the Yangtze River is one of hundreds of smaller Chinese cities still bursting with consumer vitality. It’s if these striving cities lose momentum that China is in danger of failing, writes Andrew Browne.

Emails Point to Large Role for Clinton Adviser

Longtime aide Sidney Blumenthal maintained an outsize role with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, despite being blocked from taking a job at the department. 61

Lebanese ‘YouStink’ Activists Occupy Minister’s Offices

Members of a grass-roots antigovernment movement occupied the offices of the environment minister in Beirut to press their demands for his resignation.

Russia Puts Off Data Showdown With Technology Firms

Facebook, Google and Twitter are among the U.S. companies that are getting more time to comply with a new law requiring Russian data centers.

Personal Tech | DxO One Review

Finally, an iPhone Camera Good Enough for a Pro

The DxO One is a tiny attachment offering a big upgrade to your iPhone camera. Geoffrey A. Fowler reviews.

Review

Thermal Cameras Reveal an Unseen World

With the Seek Compact and Flir One cameras, little $250 accessories for iPhones and Android phones give you “Predator” vision.

Intel Bets New Chips Will Revive PC Sales

Intel is overhauling its flagship line of computer chips, in a high-stakes bid to revive personal-computer sales.

Video

Hungary Stops Migrants Boarding Trains To Germany

1:46

Ukraine Protest Blast Kills Officer, Injures Dozens

0:45

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38