The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Grim Toll of Migrant Crisis Rises on Sea, Land

The latest deaths of migrants both on land and at sea are shedding light on the brutal tactics of the people-smuggling operations that stretch from across the Mediterranean to deep within Europe’s borders.

Stock Swings Don’t Shake Investors

Stock indexes’ wildest week in years rattled investors and fueled expectations for further price swings, but it failed to squelch the belief U.S. markets remain the best place to put money.

Egyptian Court Sentences Al Jazeera Journalists

An Egyptian court found three Al Jazeera English journalists guilty Saturday on charges including broadcasting false news, sentencing them to three years in prison.

Foes Try New Ways To Attack Iran Deal

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R., Tenn.), right, listens to Sen. John Barrasso (R., Wyo.) last month in Washington, D.C.

Congressional opponents of the Iranian nuclear accord are devising a Plan B as President Obama moves closer to locking up the support needed to implement the deal. 169

Treading Line Between War and Peace, U.S. Special Forces Groom Afghan Troops

Special-operations units are trying to get their local counterparts ready for combat before American troops leave Afghanistan.

Central Bankers Rethink Views on Inflation

Central bankers aren’t sure they understand how inflation works anymore. Inflation didn’t fall as much as many expected during the financial crisis and it hasn’t bounced back as they predicted when the economy recovered and unemployment fell.

Foreign Man Arrested in Bangkok Blast Probe

Thai police said they arrested a foreign man whom they described as a suspect in this month’s deadly bombing of a Bangkok shrine that is popular with Chinese tourists.

Syngenta Shareholders Not Happy

Some Syngenta shareholders are angry about the pesticide-and-seed giant’s rejection of takeover proposals from rival Monsanto, which abandoned its pursuit this week.

Inmarsat Says Russian Proton Rocket Puts Satellite Into Orbit

Inmarsat declared the launch of a Russian Proton rocket carrying one of its satellites a success after the rocket delivered its cargo into its initial orbit position.

China’s Moves Won’t Help U.S. Tech Firms

China’s moves to spur its slowing economy are having an important but less obvious effect on the tech sector: Strengthening local companies that already were making life difficult for U.S. rivals.

European Refiners’ Profit Revival Faces End

Europe’s biggest energy companies have enjoyed a revival of refinery profits, but that run may be winding down even as oil prices slump.

Tesla Wants White House to Press China

Tesla Motors wants the Obama administration to talk to Xi Jinping about making it easier for auto makers to do business in China during the Chinese president’s visit to the U.S.

Buying the Dips Doesn’t Work for Everyone

The old strategy of buying the dips may not work for everyone. In fact, for some people, it could be disastrous, writes Jason Zweig.

How Do You Short China?

Traders are scouring stock, bond and currency markets for ways to make money on the malaise afflicting China. Some are piling into insurance-like contracts that would pay out if the country defaulted on a small pool of its foreign-denominated bonds.

Myanmar Buzz Fades for Many U.S. Investors

Disenchantment with the business climate, especially among American companies, comes as concerns are spreading about Myanmar’s political future.

A ‘Black Swan’ Fund Made $1 Billion This Week

Universa Hedge Fund, a well-known ‘black swan’ fund, made more than $1 billion in profits in one week amid volatility.

Lebanon’s youth-led “You Stink” movement initially formed as a protest against mounds of uncollected garbage in Beirut. Now it wants political change.

Anger Over Garbage in Lebanon Blossoms into Demands for Reform

Calls for political reform, however, collide with country’s entrenched, sectarian-based political system.

Malaysia Police on Alert as Thousands Protest

Malaysian police deployed hundreds of riot police around the center of the capital Kuala Lumpur ahead of what is shaping up as a massive weekend protest, the latest challenge to Prime Minister Najib Razak.

Pro-Kurdish Party Joins Interim Government in Turkey

The power-sharing lineup unveiled by Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu also includes several independent appointees.

China’s World

Markets? To Xi Jinping, Another Battle Comes First

Those who think a wilting economy and stock-market turmoil may divert Xi Jinping’s focus from his anticorruption campaign misunderstand his priorities, writes Andrew Browne. 58

Mansion

A Swedish Couple’s Lakeside Oasis

Entrepreneur Olof Sköld and his partner, Helene Carson, build a retreat for their family

Review

Essay

The Lessons of Out-of-Body Experiences

Powerful, unnerving hallucinations show there’s something malleable about the way our brains construct our sense of self.

Historically Speaking

A History of Star-Crossed Lovers

Lovers separated by cruel circumstance have played a role in history and literature for millennia. Amanda Foreman looks at Berenice and Titus, Abelard and Heloise and more

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09

On Wine: Will Lyons

Why Gin Is Back With a Flourish

Gin is experiencing the kind of boom the wine industry experienced in the mid-1980s, as boutique-distilled bottles with names like Half Hitch, Opihr and Ransom Old Tom give the classic G&T a new—and flavorful—twist

Music

Foals’ ‘What Went Down’ Is a Visceral Confessional

Yannis Philippakis, the lead singer whose energetic stage presence and novelistic lyrics have made Foals one of British rock’s most compelling propositions, talks about the band’s fourth album.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Das Ende der Google-Transparenz in China

Von Juro Osawa

Googles Websuche in China warnt seit Kurzem nicht mehr, wenn Nutzer ein Wort in das Suchfeld eintragen, das Pekings Internet-Zensoren auf den Plan rufen könnte. Diese Warnfunktion wurde Ende Mai eingeführt und informierte Google-Nutzer in Festland-China darüber, wenn sie ein politisch sensibles  Suchwort eingaben.

Die Zensur des Internets erfolgt in China zum Teil direkt über den Staat. Den Großteil überlässt er aber den jeweiligen Dienstanbietern, die Nachrichte löschen, welche gegen lokale oder nationale Gesetzte verstoßen. Seit 2010 weigert sich Google aber, die Zensur selbst auszuführen, und ist mit seinen Servern nach Honkong umgezogen. In der ehemaligen britischen Kronkolonie herrschen Presse- und Meinungsfreiheit.

Chinas Internet-Zensoren sind deshalb dazu übergegangen, bei kritischen Suchworten einfach die Verbindung zu kappen und es wie einen technischen Fehler aussehen zu lassen. Der Nutzer bekam nur den Hinweis, dass sich Googles Websuche derzeit nicht erreichen lasse.

Als Google im vergangenen Jahr diese Methode erkannte, warnte es seine Nutzer vor dem Vorgehen der Zensoren. Sobald ein Nutzer ein Wort eingab, das ein potenziell problematisches  Schriftzeichen enthielt, erschien die Nachricht, dass eine Suche nach diesem Schriftzeichen „die Verbindung zu Google vorübergehend unterbrechen könnte“. Google sei für die Unterbrechung nicht verantwortlich.

Im offiziellen Google-Blog schrieb das Unternehmen am 31. Mai: „Wir bekamen eine Menge Reaktionen, in denen man uns sagte, dass die Suchergebnisse auf dem Festland unbeständig und unzuverlässig sind. […] Wir haben festgestellt, dass diese Unterbrechungen eng mit bestimmten Suchen verknüpft sind.“

Von einigen politisch heiklen Worten und Sätzen ist weithin bekannt, dass sie die Zensur auslösen. Doch die chinesische Regierung veröffentlicht und kommentiert die Internet-Restriktionen nicht und behandelt die zensierten Worte als Staatsgeheimnis.

Einige Analysten werteten die Warnungen von Google als Aufstand Googles gegen Chinas Zensurversuche. Ein Google-Sprecher bestätigte nun, dass die Warnfunktion inzwischen wieder beseitigt wurde, wollte sich aber nicht zu den Gründen äußern. Im November waren Google-Dienste wie Websuche und E-Mail für kurze Zeit landesweit blockiert worden.

 

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Grim Toll of Migrant Crisis Rises on Sea, Land

The latest deaths of migrants both on land and at sea are shedding light on the brutal tactics of the people-smuggling operations that stretch from across the Mediterranean to deep within Europe’s borders.

Stock Swings Don’t Shake Investors

Stock indexes’ wildest week in years rattled investors and fueled expectations for further price swings, but it failed to squelch the belief U.S. markets remain the best place to put money.

Egyptian Court Sentences Al Jazeera Journalists

An Egyptian court found three Al Jazeera English journalists guilty Saturday on charges including broadcasting false news, sentencing them to three years in prison.

Foes Try New Ways To Attack Iran Deal

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R., Tenn.), right, listens to Sen. John Barrasso (R., Wyo.) last month in Washington, D.C.

Congressional opponents of the Iranian nuclear accord are devising a Plan B as President Obama moves closer to locking up the support needed to implement the deal. 169

Treading Line Between War and Peace, U.S. Special Forces Groom Afghan Troops

Special-operations units are trying to get their local counterparts ready for combat before American troops leave Afghanistan.

Central Bankers Rethink Views on Inflation

Central bankers aren’t sure they understand how inflation works anymore. Inflation didn’t fall as much as many expected during the financial crisis and it hasn’t bounced back as they predicted when the economy recovered and unemployment fell.

Foreign Man Arrested in Bangkok Blast Probe

Thai police said they arrested a foreign man whom they described as a suspect in this month’s deadly bombing of a Bangkok shrine that is popular with Chinese tourists.

Syngenta Shareholders Not Happy

Some Syngenta shareholders are angry about the pesticide-and-seed giant’s rejection of takeover proposals from rival Monsanto, which abandoned its pursuit this week.

Inmarsat Says Russian Proton Rocket Puts Satellite Into Orbit

Inmarsat declared the launch of a Russian Proton rocket carrying one of its satellites a success after the rocket delivered its cargo into its initial orbit position.

China’s Moves Won’t Help U.S. Tech Firms

China’s moves to spur its slowing economy are having an important but less obvious effect on the tech sector: Strengthening local companies that already were making life difficult for U.S. rivals.

European Refiners’ Profit Revival Faces End

Europe’s biggest energy companies have enjoyed a revival of refinery profits, but that run may be winding down even as oil prices slump.

Tesla Wants White House to Press China

Tesla Motors wants the Obama administration to talk to Xi Jinping about making it easier for auto makers to do business in China during the Chinese president’s visit to the U.S.

Buying the Dips Doesn’t Work for Everyone

The old strategy of buying the dips may not work for everyone. In fact, for some people, it could be disastrous, writes Jason Zweig.

How Do You Short China?

Traders are scouring stock, bond and currency markets for ways to make money on the malaise afflicting China. Some are piling into insurance-like contracts that would pay out if the country defaulted on a small pool of its foreign-denominated bonds.

Myanmar Buzz Fades for Many U.S. Investors

Disenchantment with the business climate, especially among American companies, comes as concerns are spreading about Myanmar’s political future.

A ‘Black Swan’ Fund Made $1 Billion This Week

Universa Hedge Fund, a well-known ‘black swan’ fund, made more than $1 billion in profits in one week amid volatility.

Lebanon’s youth-led “You Stink” movement initially formed as a protest against mounds of uncollected garbage in Beirut. Now it wants political change.

Anger Over Garbage in Lebanon Blossoms into Demands for Reform

Calls for political reform, however, collide with country’s entrenched, sectarian-based political system.

Malaysia Police on Alert as Thousands Protest

Malaysian police deployed hundreds of riot police around the center of the capital Kuala Lumpur ahead of what is shaping up as a massive weekend protest, the latest challenge to Prime Minister Najib Razak.

Pro-Kurdish Party Joins Interim Government in Turkey

The power-sharing lineup unveiled by Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu also includes several independent appointees.

China’s World

Markets? To Xi Jinping, Another Battle Comes First

Those who think a wilting economy and stock-market turmoil may divert Xi Jinping’s focus from his anticorruption campaign misunderstand his priorities, writes Andrew Browne. 58

Mansion

A Swedish Couple’s Lakeside Oasis

Entrepreneur Olof Sköld and his partner, Helene Carson, build a retreat for their family

Review

Essay

The Lessons of Out-of-Body Experiences

Powerful, unnerving hallucinations show there’s something malleable about the way our brains construct our sense of self.

Historically Speaking

A History of Star-Crossed Lovers

Lovers separated by cruel circumstance have played a role in history and literature for millennia. Amanda Foreman looks at Berenice and Titus, Abelard and Heloise and more

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09