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Austria Struggles to Identify Migrants’ Bodies

Veteran police investigators say they have never faced a task like identifying the 71 bodies of would-be refugees unloaded from the back of a truck found abandoned along a highway last week.

5 Points to Watch in the ECB’s September Meeting

Is it time to take the European Central Bank’s stimulus off cruise control? This is the key question heading into Thursday's policy meeting. Here are five things to watch during ECB President Mario Draghi's press conference.

Asian Shares Rise; China Closed

Asian stocks rose after U.S. markets restored some stability. China markets are closed on Thursday and Friday for a holiday.

Europe File

Tsipras Moves Greece Past Austerity Debate

Greeks can now have a conventional political debate on the choices needed to hit its bailout targets.

Inside Uber’s Fight With Its Chinese Nemesis

China’s multibillion-dollar ride-hailing market has erupted into a brawl between Uber and Beijing startup Didi Kuaidi.

China to Slim Down Military

At a military parade marking 70 years since Japan’s defeat in World War II, President Xi Jinping announced that China’s armed forces will reduce the number of troops by 300,000.

Apple’s Latest Challenge: Topping Its Own Success

Apple’s iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus reignited sales growth for the smartphone. But analysts predict muted growth for its latest models due out next week.

Vivendi Earnings Rise

Vivendi SA on Wednesday reported a rise in second-quarter net profit, boosted by a windfall from the sale of its Brazilian telecom unit GVT to Telefónica SA.

Syngenta Moves to Calm Disappointed Shareholders

Syngenta moved to appease shareholders angered by its rejection of a takeover from Monsanto, saying it will divest its global vegetables seeds business and return more than $2 billion to shareholders.

Small Firms Slow to Embrace Chip-Card System

Many small businesses aren’t racing to update their checkout systems ahead of an Oct. 1 shift that will put merchants on the hook for some fraudulent card charges.

Shell, Exxon Must Pay Groningen Quake Compensation

A Dutch court ruled that Royal Dutch Shell and Exxon Mobil must compensate homeowners for a drop in house prices caused by earthquakes linked to production at the Groningen gas field.

Novartis Closer to Selling Copy of Amgen’s Neupogen

A federal appeals court in Washington denied Amgen Inc.’s request for a temporary injunction to block Novartis AG from selling a copycat version of the blockbuster drug Neupogen in the U.S.

Devaluation Strengthens China’s Hand at IMF

Beijing’s careful management of its currency since its devaluation last month is bolstering China’s bid to get the yuan included in the IMF’s basket of reserve currencies as soon as November.

Private-Equity Firms Explore Bids for Petco

Private-equity firms are examining a possible purchase of Petco Holdings, the pet-store chain that filed to go public last month.

Barclays Sells Portuguese Retail-Banking Business

Barclays PLC has sold its Portuguese retail banking business to Spain’s Bankinter SA, as the British bank scales back its presence in less profitable markets.

Malaysian Fund 1MDB Has Tens of Millions of Dollars Frozen

Swiss authorities said they had frozen funds worth tens of millions of dollars linked to 1Malaysia Development Berhad as part of an investigation into alleged corruption.

Obama Locks in Votes to Secure Iran Nuclear Deal

President Barack Obama locked in enough support in Congress to ensure he can overcome bipartisan opposition and implement a landmark nuclear accord with Iran. 1822

Gas Discovery in Egypt Troubles Israel

Israeli officials have expressed concern that the discovery of an extensive gas field off the coast of Egypt could upend Israeli development of its energy resources.

Masked Gunmen Kidnap 18 Turkish Workers in Baghdad

Identities of the gunmen in an early-morning raid on a sports stadium weren’t immediately known, as Turks in Iraq were seized for a second time in the past year.

At Least 22 Killed in Suicide Bombings at Mosque in Yemen

A pair of suicide bombings killed a least 22 people Wednesday at a mosque in San’a, just hours after a gunman killed two Red Cross workers.

Solitary Confinement Poses ‘Grave Problem,’ Study Says

Prisons are holding as many as 100,000 inmates in solitary confinement, a striking figure that poses a “grave problem” for the criminal justice system, according to a study. 56

Emails Point to Large Role for Clinton Adviser Blumenthal

Longtime aide Sidney Blumenthal maintained an outsize role with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, despite being blocked from taking a job at the department. 189

Biden’s Florida Trip Draws Campaign-Level Attention

Vice President Joe Biden received full-court national attention for an otherwise routine visit to Miami Dade College, with dozens of television cameras, photographers and reporters there to cover his 30 minutes of remarks.

Court Weighs Request to Immediately Stop Phone-Data Collection

An appeals court panel is considering whether to allow the government to continue the bulk collection of phone records during a six-month transition period until a new law kicks in prohibiting the controversial program.

Video

Hungarian Police Struggle to Control Migrants

2:02

The Iran Nuclear Deal Explained

3:34

Uber Class-Action Lawsuit: What's at Stake

2:39

20 Odd Questions

Manolo Blahnik on Old Films and Kate Moss

The shoe designer on what he’d blow his money on, the drama behind Kate Moss’s wedding shoes and exactly how he feels about fake Manolos.

A Modigliani Painting for $100 Million?

Christie’s International said it expects to ask roughly $100 million for a Modigliani nude that will be auctioned this fall, a bold reflection of how prices for blue-chip paintings have skyrocketed in recent seasons.

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WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Google überholt Apple bei den Apps

Googles Play Store hat Apples App Store in Sachen Vielfalt überholt: Nach einer aktuelle Schätzung der Internetseite The Sociable wird Googles Store bereits im Juni die Grenze von einer Millionen verfügbarer Programme überschreiten. Derzeit bietet Googles mobiles Betriebssystem Android demnach rund 800.000 Apps zur Auswahl. Die letzten offiziellen Zahlen von Google wiesen im Oktober noch 700.000 Apps aus.

Im App Store von Apple sind laut offizieller Zahl vom Montag 775.000 Apps zu haben – Anwendungen für geknackte „Jailbreak“-iPhones , die abseits des offiziellen Kanals angeboten werden, nicht mitgerechnet. Microsofts Windows Phone ist mit etwa 150.000 Apps weit abgeschlagen.

anzahl-der-verfuegbaren-apps-in-den-top-app-stores

Quelle: Statista.de

Zeitgleich zu den neuen Zahlen zur App-Fülle teile Apple mit, dass der Store die Marke von 40 Milliarden Downloads seit dem Start 2008 durchbrochen habe – die Hälfte davon hätte allein 2012 stattgefunden. Damit dürfte das Unternehmen in dieser Hinsicht noch vor Google liegen, das im September 2012 auf 24 Millionen Android-Downloads kam.

Und noch ein weiterer Punkt macht den App Store aus Sicht der App-Industrie attraktiver: Apple-Nutzer geben im Schnitt deutlich mehr Geld für die kleinen Programme aus. Das dominante Finanzierungsmodell bei den Android-Apps ist Werbung, während  auf dem iPhone auch viele Bezahl-Apps Erfolg haben. Laut Apple zahlte das Unternehmen seit Bestehen des App Stores sieben Milliarden US-Dollar an Entwickler aus – 30 Prozent des Preises jeder verkauften App behält das Unternehmen ein.

Die bislang am häufigsten heruntergelade App bei Apple ist nach Angaben des Unternehmens das Spiel Temple Run. Die App von Imangi Studios wurde 2012 laut Apple 75 Millionen Mal heruntergeladen.

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Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Austria Struggles to Identify Migrants’ Bodies

Veteran police investigators say they have never faced a task like identifying the 71 bodies of would-be refugees unloaded from the back of a truck found abandoned along a highway last week.

5 Points to Watch in the ECB’s September Meeting

Is it time to take the European Central Bank’s stimulus off cruise control? This is the key question heading into Thursday's policy meeting. Here are five things to watch during ECB President Mario Draghi's press conference.

Asian Shares Rise; China Closed

Asian stocks rose after U.S. markets restored some stability. China markets are closed on Thursday and Friday for a holiday.

Europe File

Tsipras Moves Greece Past Austerity Debate

Greeks can now have a conventional political debate on the choices needed to hit its bailout targets.

Inside Uber’s Fight With Its Chinese Nemesis

China’s multibillion-dollar ride-hailing market has erupted into a brawl between Uber and Beijing startup Didi Kuaidi.

China to Slim Down Military

At a military parade marking 70 years since Japan’s defeat in World War II, President Xi Jinping announced that China’s armed forces will reduce the number of troops by 300,000.

Apple’s Latest Challenge: Topping Its Own Success

Apple’s iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus reignited sales growth for the smartphone. But analysts predict muted growth for its latest models due out next week.

Vivendi Earnings Rise

Vivendi SA on Wednesday reported a rise in second-quarter net profit, boosted by a windfall from the sale of its Brazilian telecom unit GVT to Telefónica SA.

Syngenta Moves to Calm Disappointed Shareholders

Syngenta moved to appease shareholders angered by its rejection of a takeover from Monsanto, saying it will divest its global vegetables seeds business and return more than $2 billion to shareholders.

Small Firms Slow to Embrace Chip-Card System

Many small businesses aren’t racing to update their checkout systems ahead of an Oct. 1 shift that will put merchants on the hook for some fraudulent card charges.

Shell, Exxon Must Pay Groningen Quake Compensation

A Dutch court ruled that Royal Dutch Shell and Exxon Mobil must compensate homeowners for a drop in house prices caused by earthquakes linked to production at the Groningen gas field.

Novartis Closer to Selling Copy of Amgen’s Neupogen

A federal appeals court in Washington denied Amgen Inc.’s request for a temporary injunction to block Novartis AG from selling a copycat version of the blockbuster drug Neupogen in the U.S.

Devaluation Strengthens China’s Hand at IMF

Beijing’s careful management of its currency since its devaluation last month is bolstering China’s bid to get the yuan included in the IMF’s basket of reserve currencies as soon as November.

Private-Equity Firms Explore Bids for Petco

Private-equity firms are examining a possible purchase of Petco Holdings, the pet-store chain that filed to go public last month.

Barclays Sells Portuguese Retail-Banking Business

Barclays PLC has sold its Portuguese retail banking business to Spain’s Bankinter SA, as the British bank scales back its presence in less profitable markets.

Malaysian Fund 1MDB Has Tens of Millions of Dollars Frozen

Swiss authorities said they had frozen funds worth tens of millions of dollars linked to 1Malaysia Development Berhad as part of an investigation into alleged corruption.

Obama Locks in Votes to Secure Iran Nuclear Deal

President Barack Obama locked in enough support in Congress to ensure he can overcome bipartisan opposition and implement a landmark nuclear accord with Iran. 1822

Gas Discovery in Egypt Troubles Israel

Israeli officials have expressed concern that the discovery of an extensive gas field off the coast of Egypt could upend Israeli development of its energy resources.

Masked Gunmen Kidnap 18 Turkish Workers in Baghdad

Identities of the gunmen in an early-morning raid on a sports stadium weren’t immediately known, as Turks in Iraq were seized for a second time in the past year.

At Least 22 Killed in Suicide Bombings at Mosque in Yemen

A pair of suicide bombings killed a least 22 people Wednesday at a mosque in San’a, just hours after a gunman killed two Red Cross workers.

Solitary Confinement Poses ‘Grave Problem,’ Study Says

Prisons are holding as many as 100,000 inmates in solitary confinement, a striking figure that poses a “grave problem” for the criminal justice system, according to a study. 56

Emails Point to Large Role for Clinton Adviser Blumenthal

Longtime aide Sidney Blumenthal maintained an outsize role with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, despite being blocked from taking a job at the department. 189

Biden’s Florida Trip Draws Campaign-Level Attention

Vice President Joe Biden received full-court national attention for an otherwise routine visit to Miami Dade College, with dozens of television cameras, photographers and reporters there to cover his 30 minutes of remarks.

Court Weighs Request to Immediately Stop Phone-Data Collection

An appeals court panel is considering whether to allow the government to continue the bulk collection of phone records during a six-month transition period until a new law kicks in prohibiting the controversial program.

Video

Hungarian Police Struggle to Control Migrants

2:02

The Iran Nuclear Deal Explained

3:34

Uber Class-Action Lawsuit: What's at Stake

2:39