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Austria Struggles to Identify Migrants’ Bodies

Veteran police investigators say they have never faced a task like identifying the 71 bodies of would-be refugees unloaded from the back of a truck found abandoned along a highway last week.

Apple’s Latest Challenge: Topping Its Own Success

Apple’s iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus reignited sales growth for the smartphone. But analysts predict muted growth for its latest models due out next week.

Chinese Navy Ships Operating in Bering Sea Off Alaska Coast

Five Chinese navy ships are currently operating in the Bering Sea, off the coast of Alaska, the first time the U.S. military has seen such activity in the area. 634

Capital Account

For Russia, Oil Collapse Has Soviet Echoes

For most countries, the economic slowdown in China and the accompanying slump in commodity prices represent something between nuisance and pothole. For Russia, they are a catastrophe, writes Greg Ip. 70

Inside Uber’s Fight With Its Chinese Nemesis

China’s multibillion-dollar ride-hailing market has erupted into a brawl between Uber and Beijing startup Didi Kuaidi.

Obama Locks in Votes to Secure Iran Nuclear Deal

President Barack Obama locked in enough support in Congress to ensure he can overcome bipartisan opposition and implement a landmark nuclear accord with Iran. 1734

U.S. Tech Firms Make Pilgrimage to Brussels

The giants of Silicon Valley are bulking up in the European Union’s de facto capital, hiring lobbyists and jostling for the favor of the Web’s most ambitious regulators.

South African Gold Faces Uncertain Future

South Africa’s gold mining industry must undergo radical change to cope with falling prices, intensifying labor disputes and the surging cost of ever-deeper exploration.

A Modigliani Painting for $100 Million?

Christie’s International said it expects to ask roughly $100 million for a Modigliani nude that will be auctioned this fall, a bold reflection of how prices for blue-chip paintings have skyrocketed in recent seasons.

Small Firms Slow to Embrace Chip-Card System

Many small businesses aren’t racing to update their checkout systems ahead of an Oct. 1 shift that will put merchants on the hook for some fraudulent card charges.

Shell, Exxon Must Pay Groningen Quake Compensation

A Dutch court ruled that Royal Dutch Shell and Exxon Mobil must compensate homeowners for a drop in house prices caused by earthquakes linked to production at the Groningen gas field.

Private-Equity Firms Explore Bids for Petco

Private-equity firms are examining a possible purchase of Petco Holdings, the pet-store chain that filed to go public last month.

Asian Shares Rise; China Closed

Asian stocks rose after U.S. markets restored some stability. China markets are closed on Thursday and Friday for a holiday.

Giant U.S. Pension Fund to Propose Shift Away From Stocks, Bonds

The California State Teachers’ Retirement System, the nation’s second-largest pension fund, is considering a significant shift away from some stocks and bonds amid turbulent markets world-wide. 105

Malaysian Fund 1MDB Has Tens of Millions of Dollars Frozen

Swiss authorities said they had frozen funds worth tens of millions of dollars linked to 1Malaysia Development Berhad as part of an investigation into alleged corruption.

Gas Discovery in Egypt Troubles Israel

Israeli officials have expressed concern that the discovery of an extensive gas field off the coast of Egypt could upend Israeli development of its energy resources.

Environment

World Tree Count Climbs

There are slightly more than three trillion trees in the world, a figure that dwarfs previous estimates, according to the most comprehensive census yet of global forestation. 146

Masked Gunmen Kidnap 18 Turkish Workers in Baghdad

Identities of the gunmen in an early-morning raid on a sports stadium weren’t immediately known, as Turks in Iraq were seized for a second time in the past year.

At Least 22 Killed in Suicide Bombings at Mosque in Yemen

A pair of suicide bombings killed a least 22 people Wednesday at a mosque in San’a, just hours after a gunman killed two Red Cross workers.

Solitary Confinement Poses ‘Grave Problem,’ Study Says

Prisons are holding as many as 100,000 inmates in solitary confinement, a striking figure that poses a “grave problem” for the criminal justice system, according to a study.

Emails Point to Large Role for Clinton Adviser Blumenthal

Longtime aide Sidney Blumenthal maintained an outsize role with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, despite being blocked from taking a job at the department. 189

Biden’s Florida Trip Draws Campaign-Level Attention

Vice President Joe Biden received full-court national attention for an otherwise routine visit to Miami Dade College, with dozens of television cameras, photographers and reporters there to cover his 30 minutes of remarks.

Court Weighs Request to Immediately Stop Phone-Data Collection

An appeals court panel is considering whether to allow the government to continue the bulk collection of phone records during a six-month transition period until a new law kicks in prohibiting the controversial program.

Search Continues for Three Suspects After Illinois Policeman Killed

As a small northern Illinois community mourned a popular veteran police officer who was fatally shot while on duty, authorities scoured the area overnight in search of three men wanted in his slaying. 72

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Hungarian Police Struggle to Control Migrants

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20 Odd Questions

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The legendary actor is as busy as ever, with starring roles in the film adaptation of Bill Bryson’s ‘A Walk in the Woods’ and in the forthcoming drama, ‘Truth.’

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Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Java-Sicherheitslücke: 850 Millionen PCs in Gefahr

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Ende vergangener Woche wurde eine kritische Sicherheitslücke in Java SE bekannt. Die Plattform für Programme, die in der Programmiersprache Java geschrieben sind, ist weit verbreitet. Laut Berechnungen von Sicherheitsexperten sind weltweit vermutlich mehr als 850 Millionen PCs in Gefahr.

Bei der Lücke handelte es sich um einen sogenannten Zero-Day-Exploit – eine bislang unbekannte Lücke, die sofort ausgenutzt werden kann, weil gegen sie kein Schutz besteht, außer die betroffene Software zu deinstallieren.

Das Bundesamt für  Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik (BSI) empfahl daher genau das – denn es war zunächst keine Sicherheitsaktualisierung vom Java-Entwickler Oracle verfügbar. Laut Berichten wurde die Lücke bereits aktiv ausgenutzt. Die PCs von Nutzern, die eine entsprechend manipulierte Website mit aktiviertem Java-Plugin in ihrem Browser ansteuerten, konnten ohne weiteres Zutun durch Schadsoftware infiziert werden.

Inzwischen hat Oracle eine Sicherheitsaktualisierung zur Verfügung gestellt, die das Problem löst und die Sicherheits-Standardeinstellung von Java von „mittel“ auf „hoch“ anhebt. Dadurch können nun nur noch Java-Programme ausgeführt werden, wenn der Nutzer dem ausdrücklich zustimmt.

Java ist eine Programmiersprache, die darauf ausgelegt ist, Software unter verschiedensten Betriebssystem und Hardware-Architekturen auszuführen – sei es Windows, Mac OS X, Linux oder Smartphones mit Android. Dementsprechend traf die Lücke sowohl Windows- als auch Mac-Nutzer.  Sowohl Apple als auch die Firefox-Macher Mozilla reagierten und blockierten Java-Software.

Java sollte nicht mit der ähnlich klingenden Webprogrammiersprache Javascript verwechselt werden, die heute in jedem Webbrowser eingebaut ist und ohne die viele Websites heute nicht mehr funktionieren.

Weite Verbreitung von Java wird zum Fluch

Java gehört neben dem Flash-Plugin von Adobe zur Darstellung von Multimedia-Inhalten und dem Programm Adobe Reader zum Anzeige von PDF-Dateien zu den am häufigsten installierten Zusatz-Programmen auf Windows-PCs und Macs. Entsprechend beliebt sind die Programme auch zum Einschleusen von Schadsoftware. Viele Sicherheitsexperten raten daher grundsätzlich zum Entfernen von Java auf dem PC.

Sicherheitsexperte: Java-Plugin deaktivieren

Java-Sicherheitsexperte Adam Gowdiak ist nicht sicher, ob die Maßnahme von Oracle wirklich ausreicht. „Wir trauen uns nicht den Nutzern zu sagen, dass es nun sicher ist, Java wieder zu aktivieren“, sagte er der Nachrichtenagentur Reuters. H.D. Moore, Sicherheitschef bei der IT-Sicherheitsfirma Rapid7 äußerte sich sogar noch pessimistischer: „Die Nutzer sollten das Plugin einfach deaktivieren“, sagte er Forbes. „Die Nützlichkeit des Plugins ist so viel kleiner als das Risiko, das es für den Nutzer bedeutet. Es ist deutlich sicherer, es einfach auszuschalten.“

Eine Alternative besteht darin, das Java-Plugin in Webbrowsern wie Firefox, Chrome oder Internet Explorer generell zu sperren und nur bei Bedarf zu aktivieren. Im Firefox geht das über den Add-on-Manager, bei Chrome findet sich nach dem Ausklappen der „Erweiterten Einstellungen“ der Menüpunkt  „Inhaltseinstellungen“ und dort bei „Plug-ins“ die Option „Lick-to-Play“. Ist sie aktiviert, werden sämtliche Plugins wie Flash und Java erst nach einem Klick auf eine beliebige Stelle der Website ausgeführt.  Zuvor wird ein grauer Kasten angezeigt, der einen zum Klicken auffordert. Ist die Option aktiviert, muss der Nutzer beispielsweise vor jedem Anzeigen eines Youtube-Videos erst klicken.

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Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Austria Struggles to Identify Migrants’ Bodies

Veteran police investigators say they have never faced a task like identifying the 71 bodies of would-be refugees unloaded from the back of a truck found abandoned along a highway last week.

Apple’s Latest Challenge: Topping Its Own Success

Apple’s iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus reignited sales growth for the smartphone. But analysts predict muted growth for its latest models due out next week.

Chinese Navy Ships Operating in Bering Sea Off Alaska Coast

Five Chinese navy ships are currently operating in the Bering Sea, off the coast of Alaska, the first time the U.S. military has seen such activity in the area. 634

Capital Account

For Russia, Oil Collapse Has Soviet Echoes

For most countries, the economic slowdown in China and the accompanying slump in commodity prices represent something between nuisance and pothole. For Russia, they are a catastrophe, writes Greg Ip. 70

Inside Uber’s Fight With Its Chinese Nemesis

China’s multibillion-dollar ride-hailing market has erupted into a brawl between Uber and Beijing startup Didi Kuaidi.

Obama Locks in Votes to Secure Iran Nuclear Deal

President Barack Obama locked in enough support in Congress to ensure he can overcome bipartisan opposition and implement a landmark nuclear accord with Iran. 1734

U.S. Tech Firms Make Pilgrimage to Brussels

The giants of Silicon Valley are bulking up in the European Union’s de facto capital, hiring lobbyists and jostling for the favor of the Web’s most ambitious regulators.

South African Gold Faces Uncertain Future

South Africa’s gold mining industry must undergo radical change to cope with falling prices, intensifying labor disputes and the surging cost of ever-deeper exploration.

A Modigliani Painting for $100 Million?

Christie’s International said it expects to ask roughly $100 million for a Modigliani nude that will be auctioned this fall, a bold reflection of how prices for blue-chip paintings have skyrocketed in recent seasons.

Small Firms Slow to Embrace Chip-Card System

Many small businesses aren’t racing to update their checkout systems ahead of an Oct. 1 shift that will put merchants on the hook for some fraudulent card charges.

Shell, Exxon Must Pay Groningen Quake Compensation

A Dutch court ruled that Royal Dutch Shell and Exxon Mobil must compensate homeowners for a drop in house prices caused by earthquakes linked to production at the Groningen gas field.

Private-Equity Firms Explore Bids for Petco

Private-equity firms are examining a possible purchase of Petco Holdings, the pet-store chain that filed to go public last month.

Asian Shares Rise; China Closed

Asian stocks rose after U.S. markets restored some stability. China markets are closed on Thursday and Friday for a holiday.

Giant U.S. Pension Fund to Propose Shift Away From Stocks, Bonds

The California State Teachers’ Retirement System, the nation’s second-largest pension fund, is considering a significant shift away from some stocks and bonds amid turbulent markets world-wide. 105

Malaysian Fund 1MDB Has Tens of Millions of Dollars Frozen

Swiss authorities said they had frozen funds worth tens of millions of dollars linked to 1Malaysia Development Berhad as part of an investigation into alleged corruption.

Gas Discovery in Egypt Troubles Israel

Israeli officials have expressed concern that the discovery of an extensive gas field off the coast of Egypt could upend Israeli development of its energy resources.

Environment

World Tree Count Climbs

There are slightly more than three trillion trees in the world, a figure that dwarfs previous estimates, according to the most comprehensive census yet of global forestation. 146

Masked Gunmen Kidnap 18 Turkish Workers in Baghdad

Identities of the gunmen in an early-morning raid on a sports stadium weren’t immediately known, as Turks in Iraq were seized for a second time in the past year.

At Least 22 Killed in Suicide Bombings at Mosque in Yemen

A pair of suicide bombings killed a least 22 people Wednesday at a mosque in San’a, just hours after a gunman killed two Red Cross workers.

Solitary Confinement Poses ‘Grave Problem,’ Study Says

Prisons are holding as many as 100,000 inmates in solitary confinement, a striking figure that poses a “grave problem” for the criminal justice system, according to a study.

Emails Point to Large Role for Clinton Adviser Blumenthal

Longtime aide Sidney Blumenthal maintained an outsize role with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, despite being blocked from taking a job at the department. 189

Biden’s Florida Trip Draws Campaign-Level Attention

Vice President Joe Biden received full-court national attention for an otherwise routine visit to Miami Dade College, with dozens of television cameras, photographers and reporters there to cover his 30 minutes of remarks.

Court Weighs Request to Immediately Stop Phone-Data Collection

An appeals court panel is considering whether to allow the government to continue the bulk collection of phone records during a six-month transition period until a new law kicks in prohibiting the controversial program.

Search Continues for Three Suspects After Illinois Policeman Killed

As a small northern Illinois community mourned a popular veteran police officer who was fatally shot while on duty, authorities scoured the area overnight in search of three men wanted in his slaying. 72

Video

Hungarian Police Struggle to Control Migrants

2:02

The Iran Nuclear Deal Explained

3:34

Uber Class-Action Lawsuit: What's at Stake

2:39