The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Stocks Fall to Cap Wild Month

Global stock markets headed lower at the end of a turbulent month that was dominated by concerns over China and the timing of a U.S. interest rate rise.

Merkel Urges Europe to Move on Migrant Crisis

German Chancellor Angela Merkel called on Europe to tackle the migrant crisis and agree on a fair distribution of people, warning that failing to do so might put the EU’s open-border policy at risk.

Iran Deal Could Open Door to Gulf Businesses

While executives in the Gulf see opportunities, the region’s governments remain at loggerheads on other issues.

Islamic State Blows Up Temple of Bel in Syria’s Palmyra

Islamic State has partially destroyed Palmyra’s 2,000-year-old Temple of Bel in a massive explosion, the latest in a series of attacks by the militants on the Syrian city’s famed historic sites. 153

Ukrainian National Guard Officer Killed, Dozens Injured in Protest Blast

One member of Ukraine’s National Guard was killed and at least 69 others were injured outside the country’s parliament, as fighting broke out between protesters and law-enforcement officers.

Eurozone Inflation Stays Low

Eurozone consumer prices were barely higher than a year earlier in August, keeping pressure on the European Central Bank to consider additional stimulus measures to bring inflation closer to its target near 2%.

Fed Appears to Hold Line on Rate Plan

Federal Reserve officials emerged from a week of head-spinning financial turbulence largely sticking to their plan to raise U.S. interest rates before the end of the year. 93

Google, Sanofi Team Up on Diabetes Research

The Internet company said its health-care research unit plans to work with European pharmaceutical major Sanofi on new ways to monitor and treat the condition.

Gazprom Posts 29% Net Profit Growth

Russian state gas giant PAO Gazprom said net profit for the second quarter was up 29% from the same period last year as a higher ruble price made up for lower sale volumes in its most-lucrative European market.

Apple, Cisco Unveil Business Partnership

Apple and Cisco Systems are teaming up to help bring more iPhones and iPads to business users.

Iliad Lifted by New Mobile Clients

Iliad said net profit rose 16% in the first half as the French low-cost telecom company continued to win over new mobile clients with its ultracheap tariff plans.

Oil Rallies Into Bull Market Territory

U.S. oil prices jumped 8.8% Monday amid speculation that oil-producing nations might be willing to agree to output cuts to shrink the global glut of crude oil.

Abreast of the Market

Rocky Markets Could Be Good for These Stocks

Exchanges and market makers are getting a fresh look from portfolio managers seeking out investments likely to benefit from the large market swings.

Dollar Slumped Against Euro, Yen in August

The dollar retreated against the euro and the yen in August as rising concerns over global growth and inflation moved investors to push back expectations for higher U.S. interest rates and exit from some of their large consensus trades.

China’s Two-Yuan Dilemma

Since China devalued the yuan on Aug. 11, the spread between its value in Hong Kong and in the mainland has widened—a complication for Beijing’s ambitions to raise the currency’s global profile.

China ‘Punishes’ Nearly 200 People for Spreading Rumors

Sweep targets people who the government said spread false Internet rumors regarding the stock-market turmoil and deadly blasts in Tianjin. 51

U.A.E. Takes Lead in Southern Yemen

U.A.E. forces prevented Houthi rebels in Yemen from overrunning the Yemeni port city of Aden and now also reluctantly find themselves in the business of nation-building.

Biden Faces Narrow Path

As Vice President Joe Biden weighs a presidential bid, he must confront a number of fundamental questions. Among them: Does he have a viable path through an electoral map that is becoming more treacherous? 318

France to Finance Tax Cuts With Cost Savings

The French government says it can find $2.2 billion worth of savings in 2016 to pay for tax cuts for households without sacrificing France’s commitment to reduce the budget deficit.

Climate Change Builds as 2016 Issue

President Barack Obama’s trip to Alaska’s Arctic on Monday will likely reverberate much farther south, on the 2016 presidential campaign trail, where global warming is expected to emerge as a key issue. 595

Suppliers Feel Pain as Coal Miners Struggle

As big coal miners struggle, their equipment suppliers—thousands of businesses sprinkled throughout Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky—are scrambling to find new customers anywhere they can. 127

Eni Reports Huge Natural-Gas Discovery off Egypt

Eni SpA said it made a massive natural-gas discovery off the coast of Egypt in what the Italian oil-and-gas company is calling the largest ever find in the Mediterranean Sea.

China Slowdown to Hit Asia Electronics Supply Chain

After several years of torrid expansion, the slowdown in smartphone sales in China is expected to hit Asian parts suppliers.

U.K. Approves Giant North Sea Gas Project

A.P. Møller-Maersk A/S said it has received approval to develop the $4.5 billion Culzean gas field, the largest new find in the U.K. North Sea for a decade.

Startups Put Data in Farmers’ Hands

Farmers and startups like Farmobile and Granular are starting to compete with agribusiness giants over the newest commodity being harvested on U.S. farms—data.

Video

Ukraine Protest Blast Kills Officer, Injures Dozens

0:45

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

For a Triathlon Junkie, Training In Wind, in Water and on Weekends

Triathlete Tony Pritzker, who has completed 10 Half Ironman and eight Ironman races, packs training into his social life to keep up with his schedule of endurance events.

IMAGE 1 of 12

Video Music Awards 2015

Kanye West gave a long rant at the MTV Video Music Awards as he apologized to Taylor Swift for taking her microphone in 2009. Swift presented West with the Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award. Earlier, she and Nicki Minaj buried their beef by joining forces onstage.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Was steckt hinter SAPs Software-Wunderwaffe HANA?

dapd

Der deutsche Softwarekonzern SAP ist auf Werbetournee. Vergangenen Donnerstag lud der größte europäische Softwarekonzern aus Walldorf zu einer Pressekonferenz, um zu verkünden, dass nun sämtliche Kernanwendungen von SAP, die in zahlreichen Unternehmen eingesetzt wird, auf Basis der hauseigenen Datenbank HANA genutzt werden können.

SAP-Co-Chef Bill McDermott, der zusammen mit dem Dänen Jim Hagemann Snabe den Vorsitz des Unternehmens führt, sagte im Gespräch mit AllThingsD über HANA: „Wir haben inzwischen 1000 Kunden, es wächst also wirklich schnell. Wir gehen inzwischen davon aus, dass es sich um einen Markt von einer halben Milliarde US-Dollar handelt, was es zu dem am schnellsten wachsenden Softwareprodukt der Welt machen würde.“

Das mag etwas übertrieben klingen – doch für ein Business-Produkt ist das Wachstum von HANA in der Tat beeindruckend. Erst vor 18 Monaten führte SAP die Datenbanktechnik ein. Anfang Oktober nannte der Konzern die Zahl von 500 Unternehmenskunden – dreieinhalb Monate später sind es bereits doppelt so viele.

Doch was steckt hinter der neuen Wundersoftware von SAP? HANA ist eine sogenannte In-Memory-Datenbank. Das bedeutet, die Datenbank operiert komplett im schnellen Arbeitsspeicher eines Computers und nutzt nicht wie klassische Datenbanken die Festplatte, um Daten zu speichern und zu lesen. Das ermöglicht neue Anwendungen, die heute meist unter dem Stichwort Big Data zusammengefasst werden – die Analyse riesiger Datenmengen in Echtzeit.

HANA ist das am schnellsten wachsende SAP-Produkt

SAP ist nicht alleine auf dem Markt der In-Memory-Datenbanken unterwegs. Der größte Konkurrent Oracle nennt sein In-Memory-Produkt TimesTen, IBM hat SolidDB im Angebot – um nur zwei weitere große Anbieter zu nennen. Doch SAP ist sehr erfolgreich damit: Schon 2011 verzeichnete die Sparte nach Unternehmensangaben das stärkste Wachstum.

SAP will den Einsatz von HANA noch ausbauen: Seit vergangenen Donnerstag sind auch die SAP-Kernanwendungen für Unternehmen – zusammengefasst in der SAP Business Suit – auf Basis von HANA lauffähig. Damit können die SAP-Anwendungen schneller betrieben werden und sind nicht mehr auf die Datenbank eines SAP-Wettbewerbers angewiesen. Bislang betreiben viele SAP-Kunden ihre Software auf Basis einer Oracle-Datenbank. Das US-Unternehmen ist mit Abstand weltweiter Marktführer bei den Datenbanken. Andere Unternehmen setzen aber auch auf Lösungen von IBM oder Microsoft.

Arbeitsspeicher-Turbo für die Datenbank

In-Memory-Datenbanken beschleunigen die Verarbeitung großer Datenmengen im Wesentlichen durch zwei Techniken: Einerseits wird durch die Programmierung versucht, diejenigen Schreib- und Leseoperationen, die bei klassischen Datenbanken auf der Festplatte stattfinden würden, in den schnelleren Arbeitsspeicher des Computers zu verlagern. Der Arbeitsspeicher bietet deutlich schnelleren Zugriffzeiten als eine Festplatte.

Andererseits verlagern In-Memory-Datenbanken das, was bei klassischen Datenbanken im Hauptspeicher stattfindet, so weit wie möglich in den noch schnelleren Speicher des Hauptprozessors – den sogenannten CPU-Cache. Dieser Speicher sitzt direkt in den Hauptprozessoren der Rechner und hat damit einen besonders „kurzen Draht“ zu den Chips, die die Berechnungen durchführen.

Die Datenbank-Technik benötigt ein Zusammenspiel von spezieller Hardware und Software. Mit dem kombinierten Angebot von beidem aus einer Hand können In-Memory-Anbieter wie SAP, Oracle und IBM derzeit gutes Geld verdienen. Der Nachteil für Unternehmen: Der Arbeitsspeicher eines Computers ist nicht nur um ein Vielfaches schneller als eine Festplatte – die gleiche Speichermenge kostet auch deutlich mehr. Häufig wird bei In-Memory-Datenbanken vom Grid-Computing Gebrauch gemacht, bei dem viele einzelne zu einem Rechner-Verbund zusammengeschlossen werden.

Amazon und Google zeigen, was mit Biga Data möglich ist

Was die durch die In-Memory-Technik ermöglichte Echtzeitanalyse von riesigen Datenmengen Unternehmen bringen kann, machen unter anderem die IT-Riesen Amazon und Google vor. Sie werten beispielsweise in Echtzeit aus, welche Werbeanzeige von einem Websurfer gerade am wahrscheinlichsten geklickt würde oder welches Produkt ein Kunde auf der Website des Versandhändlers Amazon als nächstes interessieren könnte.

Auch dank der mobilen Smartphone- und Tablet-Revolution fallen immer mehr Daten an, viele davon werden maschinell erzeugt. Eine systematische Auswertung mittels Software kann helfen, Unternehmensentscheidungen zu optimieren – sei es bei der Marktforschung oder im Finanzsektor. Flughäfen beispielsweise nutzen die Analyse von vielen Daten in Echtzeit, um die Ankunft von Flugzeugen besser zu planen, was die Effizienz steigert.

So gut wie alle großen Technologie-Konzerne wie IBM, Intel, HP, Oracle, Dell oder EMC haben Lösungen für sehr große Datenmengen im Angebot. Mit Hadoop gibt es auch eine populäre kostenlose Open-Source-Lösung.

Studie: Datengetriebene Entscheidungen sind besser

Laut einer Studie im Auftrag des Magazins „Havard Business Manager“ erzielen Unternehmen, deren Entscheidungen datengetrieben sind, bessere Ergebnisse. Mit der Verbreitung von Tablets und Smartphones wird die Business Intelligence zunehmend mobil. Die Daten wandern immer mehr in die Cloud und können so mit der richtigen Software-Lösung auch unterwegs via Internet abgerufen werden. Die Marktforscher von Gartner schätzen, dass in wenigen Jahren schon ein Drittel aller Analysen von Unternehmensdatenbanken mobil via Smartphone oder Tablet abgerufen werden.

Das Prinzip der Cloud: Aufgrund der großen Netzwerk-Bandbreiten und der flächendeckenden Verfügbarkeit des Internets werden Computerressourcen zentralisiert und nur bei Bedarf über das Netzwerk – sei es das Internet (Public Cloud) oder das firmeninterne Netz (Private Cloud) – abgerufen. Das hilft, Kosten und Energie zu sparen, weil Computerressourcen so effektiver verwaltet werden können.

Die Anwendungen von SAP können heute alle sowohl in großen eigenen Rechenzentren betrieben werden („On-Premise-Modell“) als auch in einer Cloud-Infrastruktur – oder irgendetwas dazwischen („hybrides Modell“). SAP will nach eigener Aussage ein führender Anbieter von Cloud-Anwendungen werden. Dass es der Konzern mit dieser Ansage ernst meint, hat er zuletzt durch die Übernahme des US-Unternehmens SucessFactor für 3,4 Milliarden US-Dollar unter Beweis gestellt. SucessFactor ist Hersteller von Software im Bereich Human Resources auf Cloud-Basis.

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Stocks Fall to Cap Wild Month

Global stock markets headed lower at the end of a turbulent month that was dominated by concerns over China and the timing of a U.S. interest rate rise.

Merkel Urges Europe to Move on Migrant Crisis

German Chancellor Angela Merkel called on Europe to tackle the migrant crisis and agree on a fair distribution of people, warning that failing to do so might put the EU’s open-border policy at risk.

Iran Deal Could Open Door to Gulf Businesses

While executives in the Gulf see opportunities, the region’s governments remain at loggerheads on other issues.

Islamic State Blows Up Temple of Bel in Syria’s Palmyra

Islamic State has partially destroyed Palmyra’s 2,000-year-old Temple of Bel in a massive explosion, the latest in a series of attacks by the militants on the Syrian city’s famed historic sites. 153

Ukrainian National Guard Officer Killed, Dozens Injured in Protest Blast

One member of Ukraine’s National Guard was killed and at least 69 others were injured outside the country’s parliament, as fighting broke out between protesters and law-enforcement officers.

Eurozone Inflation Stays Low

Eurozone consumer prices were barely higher than a year earlier in August, keeping pressure on the European Central Bank to consider additional stimulus measures to bring inflation closer to its target near 2%.

Fed Appears to Hold Line on Rate Plan

Federal Reserve officials emerged from a week of head-spinning financial turbulence largely sticking to their plan to raise U.S. interest rates before the end of the year. 93

Google, Sanofi Team Up on Diabetes Research

The Internet company said its health-care research unit plans to work with European pharmaceutical major Sanofi on new ways to monitor and treat the condition.

Gazprom Posts 29% Net Profit Growth

Russian state gas giant PAO Gazprom said net profit for the second quarter was up 29% from the same period last year as a higher ruble price made up for lower sale volumes in its most-lucrative European market.

Apple, Cisco Unveil Business Partnership

Apple and Cisco Systems are teaming up to help bring more iPhones and iPads to business users.

Iliad Lifted by New Mobile Clients

Iliad said net profit rose 16% in the first half as the French low-cost telecom company continued to win over new mobile clients with its ultracheap tariff plans.

Oil Rallies Into Bull Market Territory

U.S. oil prices jumped 8.8% Monday amid speculation that oil-producing nations might be willing to agree to output cuts to shrink the global glut of crude oil.

Abreast of the Market

Rocky Markets Could Be Good for These Stocks

Exchanges and market makers are getting a fresh look from portfolio managers seeking out investments likely to benefit from the large market swings.

Dollar Slumped Against Euro, Yen in August

The dollar retreated against the euro and the yen in August as rising concerns over global growth and inflation moved investors to push back expectations for higher U.S. interest rates and exit from some of their large consensus trades.

China’s Two-Yuan Dilemma

Since China devalued the yuan on Aug. 11, the spread between its value in Hong Kong and in the mainland has widened—a complication for Beijing’s ambitions to raise the currency’s global profile.

China ‘Punishes’ Nearly 200 People for Spreading Rumors

Sweep targets people who the government said spread false Internet rumors regarding the stock-market turmoil and deadly blasts in Tianjin. 51

U.A.E. Takes Lead in Southern Yemen

U.A.E. forces prevented Houthi rebels in Yemen from overrunning the Yemeni port city of Aden and now also reluctantly find themselves in the business of nation-building.

Biden Faces Narrow Path

As Vice President Joe Biden weighs a presidential bid, he must confront a number of fundamental questions. Among them: Does he have a viable path through an electoral map that is becoming more treacherous? 318

France to Finance Tax Cuts With Cost Savings

The French government says it can find $2.2 billion worth of savings in 2016 to pay for tax cuts for households without sacrificing France’s commitment to reduce the budget deficit.

Climate Change Builds as 2016 Issue

President Barack Obama’s trip to Alaska’s Arctic on Monday will likely reverberate much farther south, on the 2016 presidential campaign trail, where global warming is expected to emerge as a key issue. 596

Suppliers Feel Pain as Coal Miners Struggle

As big coal miners struggle, their equipment suppliers—thousands of businesses sprinkled throughout Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky—are scrambling to find new customers anywhere they can. 127

Eni Reports Huge Natural-Gas Discovery off Egypt

Eni SpA said it made a massive natural-gas discovery off the coast of Egypt in what the Italian oil-and-gas company is calling the largest ever find in the Mediterranean Sea.

China Slowdown to Hit Asia Electronics Supply Chain

After several years of torrid expansion, the slowdown in smartphone sales in China is expected to hit Asian parts suppliers.

U.K. Approves Giant North Sea Gas Project

A.P. Møller-Maersk A/S said it has received approval to develop the $4.5 billion Culzean gas field, the largest new find in the U.K. North Sea for a decade.

Startups Put Data in Farmers’ Hands

Farmers and startups like Farmobile and Granular are starting to compete with agribusiness giants over the newest commodity being harvested on U.S. farms—data.

Video

Ukraine Protest Blast Kills Officer, Injures Dozens

0:45

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11