The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Grim Toll of Migrant Crisis Rises on Sea, Land

The latest deaths of migrants both on land and at sea are shedding light on the brutal tactics of the people-smuggling operations that stretch from across the Mediterranean to deep within Europe’s borders.

Stock Swings Don’t Shake Investors

Stock indexes’ wildest week in years rattled investors and fueled expectations for further price swings, but it failed to squelch the belief U.S. markets remain the best place to put money.

Egyptian Court Sentences Al Jazeera Journalists

An Egyptian judge sentenced a trio of Al Jazeera English journalists to three years in prison, prompting fresh criticism of the government’s clampdown on press and political freedoms.

Foes Try New Ways To Attack Iran Deal

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R., Tenn.), right, listens to Sen. John Barrasso (R., Wyo.) last month in Washington, D.C.

Congressional opponents of the Iranian nuclear accord are devising a Plan B as President Obama moves closer to locking up the support needed to implement the deal. 191

Central Bankers Rethink Views on Inflation

Central bankers aren’t sure they understand how inflation works anymore. Inflation didn’t fall as much as many expected during the financial crisis and it hasn’t bounced back as they predicted when the economy recovered and unemployment fell.

Foreign Man Arrested in Bangkok Blast Probe

Thai police said they arrested a foreign man whom they described as a suspect in this month’s deadly bombing of a Bangkok shrine that is popular with Chinese tourists.

Syngenta Shareholders Not Happy

Some Syngenta shareholders are angry about the pesticide-and-seed giant’s rejection of takeover proposals from rival Monsanto, which abandoned its pursuit this week.

Treading Line Between War and Peace, U.S. Special Forces Groom Afghan Troops

Special-operations units are trying to get their local counterparts ready for combat before American troops leave Afghanistan.

Malaysia Police on Alert as Thousands Protest

Malaysian police deployed hundreds of riot police around the center of the capital Kuala Lumpur ahead of what is shaping up as a massive weekend protest, the latest challenge to Prime Minister Najib Razak.

Tropical Storm Erika Weakens

Tropical storm Erika was losing its punch as it drenched Haiti and the Dominican Republic early Saturday, after killing at least 20 people and leaving another 31 missing on the small eastern Caribbean island of Dominica.

Pro-Kurdish Party Joins Interim Government in Turkey

The power-sharing lineup unveiled by Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu also includes several independent appointees.

Syriza’s Poll Lead Narrows Ahead of Election

Greece’s left-wing Syriza party is leading against its main political rival ahead of next month’s elections, according to four polls published on Friday, though the gap with the conservative New Democracy party has closed considerably.

Buying the Dips Doesn’t Work for Everyone

The old strategy of buying the dips may not work for everyone. In fact, for some people, it could be disastrous, writes Jason Zweig.

How Do You Short China?

Traders are scouring stock, bond and currency markets for ways to make money on the malaise afflicting China. Some are piling into insurance-like contracts that would pay out if the country defaulted on a small pool of its foreign-denominated bonds.

Myanmar Buzz Fades for Many U.S. Investors

Disenchantment with the business climate, especially among American companies, comes as concerns are spreading about Myanmar’s political future.

A ‘Black Swan’ Fund Made $1 Billion This Week

Universa Hedge Fund, a well-known ‘black swan’ fund, made more than $1 billion in profits in one week amid volatility.

Inmarsat Says Russian Proton Rocket Puts Satellite Into Orbit

Inmarsat declared the launch of a Russian Proton rocket carrying one of its satellites a success after the rocket delivered its cargo into its initial orbit position.

China’s Moves Won’t Help U.S. Tech Firms

China’s moves to spur its slowing economy are having an important but less obvious effect on the tech sector: Strengthening local companies that already were making life difficult for U.S. rivals.

European Refiners’ Profit Revival Faces End

Europe’s biggest energy companies have enjoyed a revival of refinery profits, but that run may be winding down even as oil prices slump.

Tesla Wants White House to Press China

Tesla Motors wants the Obama administration to talk to Xi Jinping about making it easier for auto makers to do business in China during the Chinese president’s visit to the U.S.

Mansion

A Swedish Couple’s Lakeside Oasis

Entrepreneur Olof Sköld and his partner, Helene Carson, build a retreat for their family

Review

Essay

The Lessons of Out-of-Body Experiences

Powerful, unnerving hallucinations show there’s something malleable about the way our brains construct our sense of self.

Historically Speaking

A History of Star-Crossed Lovers

Lovers separated by cruel circumstance have played a role in history and literature for millennia. Amanda Foreman looks at Berenice and Titus, Abelard and Heloise and more

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09

On Wine: Will Lyons

Why Gin Is Back With a Flourish

Gin is experiencing the kind of boom the wine industry experienced in the mid-1980s, as boutique-distilled bottles with names like Half Hitch, Opihr and Ransom Old Tom give the classic G&T a new—and flavorful—twist

Music

Foals’ ‘What Went Down’ Is a Visceral Confessional

Yannis Philippakis, the lead singer whose energetic stage presence and novelistic lyrics have made Foals one of British rock’s most compelling propositions, talks about the band’s fourth album.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Was steckt hinter SAPs Software-Wunderwaffe HANA?

dapd

Der deutsche Softwarekonzern SAP ist auf Werbetournee. Vergangenen Donnerstag lud der größte europäische Softwarekonzern aus Walldorf zu einer Pressekonferenz, um zu verkünden, dass nun sämtliche Kernanwendungen von SAP, die in zahlreichen Unternehmen eingesetzt wird, auf Basis der hauseigenen Datenbank HANA genutzt werden können.

SAP-Co-Chef Bill McDermott, der zusammen mit dem Dänen Jim Hagemann Snabe den Vorsitz des Unternehmens führt, sagte im Gespräch mit AllThingsD über HANA: „Wir haben inzwischen 1000 Kunden, es wächst also wirklich schnell. Wir gehen inzwischen davon aus, dass es sich um einen Markt von einer halben Milliarde US-Dollar handelt, was es zu dem am schnellsten wachsenden Softwareprodukt der Welt machen würde.“

Das mag etwas übertrieben klingen – doch für ein Business-Produkt ist das Wachstum von HANA in der Tat beeindruckend. Erst vor 18 Monaten führte SAP die Datenbanktechnik ein. Anfang Oktober nannte der Konzern die Zahl von 500 Unternehmenskunden – dreieinhalb Monate später sind es bereits doppelt so viele.

Doch was steckt hinter der neuen Wundersoftware von SAP? HANA ist eine sogenannte In-Memory-Datenbank. Das bedeutet, die Datenbank operiert komplett im schnellen Arbeitsspeicher eines Computers und nutzt nicht wie klassische Datenbanken die Festplatte, um Daten zu speichern und zu lesen. Das ermöglicht neue Anwendungen, die heute meist unter dem Stichwort Big Data zusammengefasst werden – die Analyse riesiger Datenmengen in Echtzeit.

HANA ist das am schnellsten wachsende SAP-Produkt

SAP ist nicht alleine auf dem Markt der In-Memory-Datenbanken unterwegs. Der größte Konkurrent Oracle nennt sein In-Memory-Produkt TimesTen, IBM hat SolidDB im Angebot – um nur zwei weitere große Anbieter zu nennen. Doch SAP ist sehr erfolgreich damit: Schon 2011 verzeichnete die Sparte nach Unternehmensangaben das stärkste Wachstum.

SAP will den Einsatz von HANA noch ausbauen: Seit vergangenen Donnerstag sind auch die SAP-Kernanwendungen für Unternehmen – zusammengefasst in der SAP Business Suit – auf Basis von HANA lauffähig. Damit können die SAP-Anwendungen schneller betrieben werden und sind nicht mehr auf die Datenbank eines SAP-Wettbewerbers angewiesen. Bislang betreiben viele SAP-Kunden ihre Software auf Basis einer Oracle-Datenbank. Das US-Unternehmen ist mit Abstand weltweiter Marktführer bei den Datenbanken. Andere Unternehmen setzen aber auch auf Lösungen von IBM oder Microsoft.

Arbeitsspeicher-Turbo für die Datenbank

In-Memory-Datenbanken beschleunigen die Verarbeitung großer Datenmengen im Wesentlichen durch zwei Techniken: Einerseits wird durch die Programmierung versucht, diejenigen Schreib- und Leseoperationen, die bei klassischen Datenbanken auf der Festplatte stattfinden würden, in den schnelleren Arbeitsspeicher des Computers zu verlagern. Der Arbeitsspeicher bietet deutlich schnelleren Zugriffzeiten als eine Festplatte.

Andererseits verlagern In-Memory-Datenbanken das, was bei klassischen Datenbanken im Hauptspeicher stattfindet, so weit wie möglich in den noch schnelleren Speicher des Hauptprozessors – den sogenannten CPU-Cache. Dieser Speicher sitzt direkt in den Hauptprozessoren der Rechner und hat damit einen besonders „kurzen Draht“ zu den Chips, die die Berechnungen durchführen.

Die Datenbank-Technik benötigt ein Zusammenspiel von spezieller Hardware und Software. Mit dem kombinierten Angebot von beidem aus einer Hand können In-Memory-Anbieter wie SAP, Oracle und IBM derzeit gutes Geld verdienen. Der Nachteil für Unternehmen: Der Arbeitsspeicher eines Computers ist nicht nur um ein Vielfaches schneller als eine Festplatte – die gleiche Speichermenge kostet auch deutlich mehr. Häufig wird bei In-Memory-Datenbanken vom Grid-Computing Gebrauch gemacht, bei dem viele einzelne zu einem Rechner-Verbund zusammengeschlossen werden.

Amazon und Google zeigen, was mit Biga Data möglich ist

Was die durch die In-Memory-Technik ermöglichte Echtzeitanalyse von riesigen Datenmengen Unternehmen bringen kann, machen unter anderem die IT-Riesen Amazon und Google vor. Sie werten beispielsweise in Echtzeit aus, welche Werbeanzeige von einem Websurfer gerade am wahrscheinlichsten geklickt würde oder welches Produkt ein Kunde auf der Website des Versandhändlers Amazon als nächstes interessieren könnte.

Auch dank der mobilen Smartphone- und Tablet-Revolution fallen immer mehr Daten an, viele davon werden maschinell erzeugt. Eine systematische Auswertung mittels Software kann helfen, Unternehmensentscheidungen zu optimieren – sei es bei der Marktforschung oder im Finanzsektor. Flughäfen beispielsweise nutzen die Analyse von vielen Daten in Echtzeit, um die Ankunft von Flugzeugen besser zu planen, was die Effizienz steigert.

So gut wie alle großen Technologie-Konzerne wie IBM, Intel, HP, Oracle, Dell oder EMC haben Lösungen für sehr große Datenmengen im Angebot. Mit Hadoop gibt es auch eine populäre kostenlose Open-Source-Lösung.

Studie: Datengetriebene Entscheidungen sind besser

Laut einer Studie im Auftrag des Magazins „Havard Business Manager“ erzielen Unternehmen, deren Entscheidungen datengetrieben sind, bessere Ergebnisse. Mit der Verbreitung von Tablets und Smartphones wird die Business Intelligence zunehmend mobil. Die Daten wandern immer mehr in die Cloud und können so mit der richtigen Software-Lösung auch unterwegs via Internet abgerufen werden. Die Marktforscher von Gartner schätzen, dass in wenigen Jahren schon ein Drittel aller Analysen von Unternehmensdatenbanken mobil via Smartphone oder Tablet abgerufen werden.

Das Prinzip der Cloud: Aufgrund der großen Netzwerk-Bandbreiten und der flächendeckenden Verfügbarkeit des Internets werden Computerressourcen zentralisiert und nur bei Bedarf über das Netzwerk – sei es das Internet (Public Cloud) oder das firmeninterne Netz (Private Cloud) – abgerufen. Das hilft, Kosten und Energie zu sparen, weil Computerressourcen so effektiver verwaltet werden können.

Die Anwendungen von SAP können heute alle sowohl in großen eigenen Rechenzentren betrieben werden („On-Premise-Modell“) als auch in einer Cloud-Infrastruktur – oder irgendetwas dazwischen („hybrides Modell“). SAP will nach eigener Aussage ein führender Anbieter von Cloud-Anwendungen werden. Dass es der Konzern mit dieser Ansage ernst meint, hat er zuletzt durch die Übernahme des US-Unternehmens SucessFactor für 3,4 Milliarden US-Dollar unter Beweis gestellt. SucessFactor ist Hersteller von Software im Bereich Human Resources auf Cloud-Basis.

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Grim Toll of Migrant Crisis Rises on Sea, Land

The latest deaths of migrants both on land and at sea are shedding light on the brutal tactics of the people-smuggling operations that stretch from across the Mediterranean to deep within Europe’s borders.

Stock Swings Don’t Shake Investors

Stock indexes’ wildest week in years rattled investors and fueled expectations for further price swings, but it failed to squelch the belief U.S. markets remain the best place to put money.

Egyptian Court Sentences Al Jazeera Journalists

An Egyptian judge sentenced a trio of Al Jazeera English journalists to three years in prison, prompting fresh criticism of the government’s clampdown on press and political freedoms.

Foes Try New Ways To Attack Iran Deal

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R., Tenn.), right, listens to Sen. John Barrasso (R., Wyo.) last month in Washington, D.C.

Congressional opponents of the Iranian nuclear accord are devising a Plan B as President Obama moves closer to locking up the support needed to implement the deal. 183

Treading Line Between War and Peace, U.S. Special Forces Groom Afghan Troops

Special-operations units are trying to get their local counterparts ready for combat before American troops leave Afghanistan.

Central Bankers Rethink Views on Inflation

Central bankers aren’t sure they understand how inflation works anymore. Inflation didn’t fall as much as many expected during the financial crisis and it hasn’t bounced back as they predicted when the economy recovered and unemployment fell.

Foreign Man Arrested in Bangkok Blast Probe

Thai police said they arrested a foreign man whom they described as a suspect in this month’s deadly bombing of a Bangkok shrine that is popular with Chinese tourists.

Syngenta Shareholders Not Happy

Some Syngenta shareholders are angry about the pesticide-and-seed giant’s rejection of takeover proposals from rival Monsanto, which abandoned its pursuit this week.

Inmarsat Says Russian Proton Rocket Puts Satellite Into Orbit

Inmarsat declared the launch of a Russian Proton rocket carrying one of its satellites a success after the rocket delivered its cargo into its initial orbit position.

China’s Moves Won’t Help U.S. Tech Firms

China’s moves to spur its slowing economy are having an important but less obvious effect on the tech sector: Strengthening local companies that already were making life difficult for U.S. rivals.

European Refiners’ Profit Revival Faces End

Europe’s biggest energy companies have enjoyed a revival of refinery profits, but that run may be winding down even as oil prices slump.

Tesla Wants White House to Press China

Tesla Motors wants the Obama administration to talk to Xi Jinping about making it easier for auto makers to do business in China during the Chinese president’s visit to the U.S.

Buying the Dips Doesn’t Work for Everyone

The old strategy of buying the dips may not work for everyone. In fact, for some people, it could be disastrous, writes Jason Zweig.

How Do You Short China?

Traders are scouring stock, bond and currency markets for ways to make money on the malaise afflicting China. Some are piling into insurance-like contracts that would pay out if the country defaulted on a small pool of its foreign-denominated bonds.

Myanmar Buzz Fades for Many U.S. Investors

Disenchantment with the business climate, especially among American companies, comes as concerns are spreading about Myanmar’s political future.

A ‘Black Swan’ Fund Made $1 Billion This Week

Universa Hedge Fund, a well-known ‘black swan’ fund, made more than $1 billion in profits in one week amid volatility.

Lebanon’s youth-led “You Stink” movement initially formed as a protest against mounds of uncollected garbage in Beirut. Now it wants political change.

Anger Over Garbage in Lebanon Blossoms into Demands for Reform

Calls for political reform, however, collide with country’s entrenched, sectarian-based political system.

Malaysia Police on Alert as Thousands Protest

Malaysian police deployed hundreds of riot police around the center of the capital Kuala Lumpur ahead of what is shaping up as a massive weekend protest, the latest challenge to Prime Minister Najib Razak.

Pro-Kurdish Party Joins Interim Government in Turkey

The power-sharing lineup unveiled by Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu also includes several independent appointees.

China’s World

Markets? To Xi Jinping, Another Battle Comes First

Those who think a wilting economy and stock-market turmoil may divert Xi Jinping’s focus from his anticorruption campaign misunderstand his priorities, writes Andrew Browne. 58

Mansion

A Swedish Couple’s Lakeside Oasis

Entrepreneur Olof Sköld and his partner, Helene Carson, build a retreat for their family

Review

Essay

The Lessons of Out-of-Body Experiences

Powerful, unnerving hallucinations show there’s something malleable about the way our brains construct our sense of self.

Historically Speaking

A History of Star-Crossed Lovers

Lovers separated by cruel circumstance have played a role in history and literature for millennia. Amanda Foreman looks at Berenice and Titus, Abelard and Heloise and more

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09