The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Thousands of Migrants Reach Austria

About 4,000 migrants, desperate to leave Hungary for Western Europe, reached Austria in the early hours of Saturday, police said, adding that the number could double.

G-20 Countries Vow to Refrain From Currency Depreciation

The world’s largest economies, including China, will renew their commitment to avoid depreciating their currencies to gain a competitive trading advantage, a senior U.S. Treasury official said Saturday.

Google Pursuing a Return to China

Google is in talks with the Chinese government and handset makers about launching a new Android app store there, a move that would mark the company’s return to China.

U.S. Veterans Who Fight ISIS

A former Army Ranger and a decorated Marine are among U.S. veterans volunteering to join Kurdish fighters against Islamic State in Syria. 69

From Piles of Trash Sprout Demands for Change in Lebanon

Protests demanding political reform bridge country’s longtime political, religious and ethnic divides.

Blurry Job Picture Poses Test for Fed

U.S. employment growth slowed in August but the jobless rate fell to the lowest level since 2008, a mixed labor-market reading less than two weeks before a crucial Federal Reserve meeting. 238

Judge Orders Credit Suisse to Pay Highland $287.5M in Suit Over Loan

A judge on Friday said Credit Suisse must pay a unit of Highland Capital Management $287.5 million over a soured real-estate loan, a win for James Dondero’s hedge-fund firm in its multipronged fight against the Swiss bank over luxury developments.

Houthi Rebels Were Behind Attack That Killed 45 U.A.E. Soldiers in Yemen

Yemen’s Iran-backed Houthi rebels were behind a rocket attack that killed 45 soldiers from the United Arab Emirates, as the country increased airstrikes against the militants in retaliation.

London Jewel Thieves Plead Guilty in Easter Heist

Four men pleaded guilty on Friday to conspiracy for a jewel heist in London’s Hatton Garden diamond district over the Easter weekend.

Putin Pitches for Foreign Investment in Russia’s Far East

Russian President Vladimir Putin has made a pitch for greater investment in his country’s resource-rich Far East region, despite a slowdown in the Chinese economy that has shaken global markets.

G-20 Increasingly Concerned About Slowing Chinese Economy

China’s market routs and a string of weak data are fueling concern among Group of 20 officials that a slowing Chinese economy could fuel further market instability and push global growth deeper into a long-term rut.

U.S. Prosecutors Cite ‘Spoofing’ Software Allegedly Used by U.K. Trader

U.K. trader Navinder Sarao, who faces a U.S. extradition hearing later this month, allegedly worked with a customized version of software known as the “matrix” in a deliberate attempt to “spoof” markets, according to a U.S. court filing.

Public Pension Funds Roll Back Return Targets

The cuts to their lowest levels since the 1980s portend greater hardships for employees and cash-strapped governments as Americans age. 108

U.K. Regulator Warns Commodity Firms About Market Abuse

The U.K.’s financial regulator said firms that trade commodities have learned little from recent high-profile cases of market abuse and are failing to adequately monitor the risks of such abuse.

Heard on the Street

This Plastics IPO Is Timed Right – For the Seller

Bayer’s material science division, now called Covestro, had a strong first-half ahead of a planned initial public offering. That looks hard to keep up.

Brussels Beat

EU Displaces U.S. as Top Antitrust Cop

The European Union’s antitrust activism has put it in prime position to shape the Internet and is encouraging some U.S. technology executives to focus on Brussels.

Daimler, Renault Reboot Tiny Car

Daimler is taking another crack at the U.S. market for ultra-compacts with a retooled version of its ForTwo Smart car built through a collaboration that could become a benchmark for other auto makers. 70

Volkswagen CFO Nominated as Board Chairman

The largest shareholder of Europe’s biggest auto maker nominated the company’s CFO to become the next chairman of VW’s supervisory board.

BASF, Gazprom Renew Abandoned Asset-Swap Plan

Germany’s BASF and Russia’s Gazprom will complete an asset-swap deal signed in 2013 but called off last year amid tension between Russia and the West.

GVC Wins Race to Acquire Bwin.party

Sports-betting and online-gambling operator GVC Holdings PLC said it had clinched a deal to buy Bwin.party Digital Entertainment PLC after beating an offer from online-gambling peer 888 Holdings PLC.

Fashion

How Fashion Experts Shop the High Street

Despite the crowds, the lines and the overpacked rails, there are real gems to be found in mainstream stores—you just need to know how to find them.

Will Lyons on Wine

What’s the Point of Scoring Wines?

A wine’s taste and character change almost daily, and taste is subjective—so is giving them marks a pointless exercise?

Theater

Michael Grandage: A Director’s DNA

With ‘Photograph 51’ at London’s Noël Coward Theatre, the acclaimed director coaxes Nicole Kidman back onstage for an exploration of the passion and poetry of science.

Going Native in NYC: 8 Things to Do as an Expat in the Big Apple

You’re relocating to the Center of the Universe, a.k.a. the Capital of the World, a.k.a. the City That Never Sleeps. So what do you do to embrace New York?

Video

Migrants Vow to March From Hungary to Austria

1:24

Migrants Refuse to Go to Refugee Camp in Hungary

1:59

Father of Aylan Kurdi Speaks at Funeral

0:58

Mind and Matter

The Power of Brains to Keep Growing

Not long ago, scientists thought that after infancy, our brains never added any neurons. Patricia Churchland on how brains keep growing

Film Review

‘La Jaula de Oro (The Golden Dream)’ Review: Dark Immigrant Odyssey

In Diego Quemada-Diez’s celebrated directorial debut, a trio of teenagers flee from Guatemala and make their way through a treacherous Mexico, where police and gangsters prey on vulnerable travelers.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Was steckt hinter SAPs Software-Wunderwaffe HANA?

dapd

Der deutsche Softwarekonzern SAP ist auf Werbetournee. Vergangenen Donnerstag lud der größte europäische Softwarekonzern aus Walldorf zu einer Pressekonferenz, um zu verkünden, dass nun sämtliche Kernanwendungen von SAP, die in zahlreichen Unternehmen eingesetzt wird, auf Basis der hauseigenen Datenbank HANA genutzt werden können.

SAP-Co-Chef Bill McDermott, der zusammen mit dem Dänen Jim Hagemann Snabe den Vorsitz des Unternehmens führt, sagte im Gespräch mit AllThingsD über HANA: „Wir haben inzwischen 1000 Kunden, es wächst also wirklich schnell. Wir gehen inzwischen davon aus, dass es sich um einen Markt von einer halben Milliarde US-Dollar handelt, was es zu dem am schnellsten wachsenden Softwareprodukt der Welt machen würde.“

Das mag etwas übertrieben klingen – doch für ein Business-Produkt ist das Wachstum von HANA in der Tat beeindruckend. Erst vor 18 Monaten führte SAP die Datenbanktechnik ein. Anfang Oktober nannte der Konzern die Zahl von 500 Unternehmenskunden – dreieinhalb Monate später sind es bereits doppelt so viele.

Doch was steckt hinter der neuen Wundersoftware von SAP? HANA ist eine sogenannte In-Memory-Datenbank. Das bedeutet, die Datenbank operiert komplett im schnellen Arbeitsspeicher eines Computers und nutzt nicht wie klassische Datenbanken die Festplatte, um Daten zu speichern und zu lesen. Das ermöglicht neue Anwendungen, die heute meist unter dem Stichwort Big Data zusammengefasst werden – die Analyse riesiger Datenmengen in Echtzeit.

HANA ist das am schnellsten wachsende SAP-Produkt

SAP ist nicht alleine auf dem Markt der In-Memory-Datenbanken unterwegs. Der größte Konkurrent Oracle nennt sein In-Memory-Produkt TimesTen, IBM hat SolidDB im Angebot – um nur zwei weitere große Anbieter zu nennen. Doch SAP ist sehr erfolgreich damit: Schon 2011 verzeichnete die Sparte nach Unternehmensangaben das stärkste Wachstum.

SAP will den Einsatz von HANA noch ausbauen: Seit vergangenen Donnerstag sind auch die SAP-Kernanwendungen für Unternehmen – zusammengefasst in der SAP Business Suit – auf Basis von HANA lauffähig. Damit können die SAP-Anwendungen schneller betrieben werden und sind nicht mehr auf die Datenbank eines SAP-Wettbewerbers angewiesen. Bislang betreiben viele SAP-Kunden ihre Software auf Basis einer Oracle-Datenbank. Das US-Unternehmen ist mit Abstand weltweiter Marktführer bei den Datenbanken. Andere Unternehmen setzen aber auch auf Lösungen von IBM oder Microsoft.

Arbeitsspeicher-Turbo für die Datenbank

In-Memory-Datenbanken beschleunigen die Verarbeitung großer Datenmengen im Wesentlichen durch zwei Techniken: Einerseits wird durch die Programmierung versucht, diejenigen Schreib- und Leseoperationen, die bei klassischen Datenbanken auf der Festplatte stattfinden würden, in den schnelleren Arbeitsspeicher des Computers zu verlagern. Der Arbeitsspeicher bietet deutlich schnelleren Zugriffzeiten als eine Festplatte.

Andererseits verlagern In-Memory-Datenbanken das, was bei klassischen Datenbanken im Hauptspeicher stattfindet, so weit wie möglich in den noch schnelleren Speicher des Hauptprozessors – den sogenannten CPU-Cache. Dieser Speicher sitzt direkt in den Hauptprozessoren der Rechner und hat damit einen besonders „kurzen Draht“ zu den Chips, die die Berechnungen durchführen.

Die Datenbank-Technik benötigt ein Zusammenspiel von spezieller Hardware und Software. Mit dem kombinierten Angebot von beidem aus einer Hand können In-Memory-Anbieter wie SAP, Oracle und IBM derzeit gutes Geld verdienen. Der Nachteil für Unternehmen: Der Arbeitsspeicher eines Computers ist nicht nur um ein Vielfaches schneller als eine Festplatte – die gleiche Speichermenge kostet auch deutlich mehr. Häufig wird bei In-Memory-Datenbanken vom Grid-Computing Gebrauch gemacht, bei dem viele einzelne zu einem Rechner-Verbund zusammengeschlossen werden.

Amazon und Google zeigen, was mit Biga Data möglich ist

Was die durch die In-Memory-Technik ermöglichte Echtzeitanalyse von riesigen Datenmengen Unternehmen bringen kann, machen unter anderem die IT-Riesen Amazon und Google vor. Sie werten beispielsweise in Echtzeit aus, welche Werbeanzeige von einem Websurfer gerade am wahrscheinlichsten geklickt würde oder welches Produkt ein Kunde auf der Website des Versandhändlers Amazon als nächstes interessieren könnte.

Auch dank der mobilen Smartphone- und Tablet-Revolution fallen immer mehr Daten an, viele davon werden maschinell erzeugt. Eine systematische Auswertung mittels Software kann helfen, Unternehmensentscheidungen zu optimieren – sei es bei der Marktforschung oder im Finanzsektor. Flughäfen beispielsweise nutzen die Analyse von vielen Daten in Echtzeit, um die Ankunft von Flugzeugen besser zu planen, was die Effizienz steigert.

So gut wie alle großen Technologie-Konzerne wie IBM, Intel, HP, Oracle, Dell oder EMC haben Lösungen für sehr große Datenmengen im Angebot. Mit Hadoop gibt es auch eine populäre kostenlose Open-Source-Lösung.

Studie: Datengetriebene Entscheidungen sind besser

Laut einer Studie im Auftrag des Magazins „Havard Business Manager“ erzielen Unternehmen, deren Entscheidungen datengetrieben sind, bessere Ergebnisse. Mit der Verbreitung von Tablets und Smartphones wird die Business Intelligence zunehmend mobil. Die Daten wandern immer mehr in die Cloud und können so mit der richtigen Software-Lösung auch unterwegs via Internet abgerufen werden. Die Marktforscher von Gartner schätzen, dass in wenigen Jahren schon ein Drittel aller Analysen von Unternehmensdatenbanken mobil via Smartphone oder Tablet abgerufen werden.

Das Prinzip der Cloud: Aufgrund der großen Netzwerk-Bandbreiten und der flächendeckenden Verfügbarkeit des Internets werden Computerressourcen zentralisiert und nur bei Bedarf über das Netzwerk – sei es das Internet (Public Cloud) oder das firmeninterne Netz (Private Cloud) – abgerufen. Das hilft, Kosten und Energie zu sparen, weil Computerressourcen so effektiver verwaltet werden können.

Die Anwendungen von SAP können heute alle sowohl in großen eigenen Rechenzentren betrieben werden („On-Premise-Modell“) als auch in einer Cloud-Infrastruktur – oder irgendetwas dazwischen („hybrides Modell“). SAP will nach eigener Aussage ein führender Anbieter von Cloud-Anwendungen werden. Dass es der Konzern mit dieser Ansage ernst meint, hat er zuletzt durch die Übernahme des US-Unternehmens SucessFactor für 3,4 Milliarden US-Dollar unter Beweis gestellt. SucessFactor ist Hersteller von Software im Bereich Human Resources auf Cloud-Basis.

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Thousands of Migrants Reach Austria

About 4,000 migrants, desperate to leave Hungary for Western Europe, reached Austria in the early hours of Saturday, police said, adding that the number could double.

G-20 Countries Vow to Refrain From Currency Depreciation

The world’s largest economies, including China, will renew their commitment to avoid depreciating their currencies to gain a competitive trading advantage, a senior U.S. Treasury official said Saturday.

Google Pursuing a Return to China

Google is in talks with the Chinese government and handset makers about launching a new Android app store there, a move that would mark the company’s return to China.

U.S. Veterans Who Fight ISIS

A former Army Ranger and a decorated Marine are among U.S. veterans volunteering to join Kurdish fighters against Islamic State in Syria. 69

From Piles of Trash Sprout Demands for Change in Lebanon

Protests demanding political reform bridge country’s longtime political, religious and ethnic divides.

Blurry Job Picture Poses Test for Fed

U.S. employment growth slowed in August but the jobless rate fell to the lowest level since 2008, a mixed labor-market reading less than two weeks before a crucial Federal Reserve meeting. 238

Judge Orders Credit Suisse to Pay Highland $287.5M in Suit Over Loan

A judge on Friday said Credit Suisse must pay a unit of Highland Capital Management $287.5 million over a soured real-estate loan, a win for James Dondero’s hedge-fund firm in its multipronged fight against the Swiss bank over luxury developments.

Houthi Rebels Were Behind Attack That Killed 45 U.A.E. Soldiers in Yemen

Yemen’s Iran-backed Houthi rebels were behind a rocket attack that killed 45 soldiers from the United Arab Emirates, as the country increased airstrikes against the militants in retaliation.

London Jewel Thieves Plead Guilty in Easter Heist

Four men pleaded guilty on Friday to conspiracy for a jewel heist in London’s Hatton Garden diamond district over the Easter weekend.

Putin Pitches for Foreign Investment in Russia’s Far East

Russian President Vladimir Putin has made a pitch for greater investment in his country’s resource-rich Far East region, despite a slowdown in the Chinese economy that has shaken global markets.

G-20 Increasingly Concerned About Slowing Chinese Economy

China’s market routs and a string of weak data are fueling concern among Group of 20 officials that a slowing Chinese economy could fuel further market instability and push global growth deeper into a long-term rut.

U.S. Prosecutors Cite ‘Spoofing’ Software Allegedly Used by U.K. Trader

U.K. trader Navinder Sarao, who faces a U.S. extradition hearing later this month, allegedly worked with a customized version of software known as the “matrix” in a deliberate attempt to “spoof” markets, according to a U.S. court filing.

Public Pension Funds Roll Back Return Targets

The cuts to their lowest levels since the 1980s portend greater hardships for employees and cash-strapped governments as Americans age. 108

U.K. Regulator Warns Commodity Firms About Market Abuse

The U.K.’s financial regulator said firms that trade commodities have learned little from recent high-profile cases of market abuse and are failing to adequately monitor the risks of such abuse.

Heard on the Street

This Plastics IPO Is Timed Right – For the Seller

Bayer’s material science division, now called Covestro, had a strong first-half ahead of a planned initial public offering. That looks hard to keep up.

Brussels Beat

EU Displaces U.S. as Top Antitrust Cop

The European Union’s antitrust activism has put it in prime position to shape the Internet and is encouraging some U.S. technology executives to focus on Brussels.

Daimler, Renault Reboot Tiny Car

Daimler is taking another crack at the U.S. market for ultra-compacts with a retooled version of its ForTwo Smart car built through a collaboration that could become a benchmark for other auto makers. 70