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Image of Syrian Boy Echoes Around World

The 3-year-old was a Syrian Kurd whose relatives’ efforts to emigrate to Canada had been rebuffed, according to media and Kurdish activists. 591

Migrant Crisis Divides Europe

Germany and France press the rest of Europe to end squabbling over its exploding numbers of refugees as Hungarian leader says his country doesn’t want ‘a large number of Muslim people.’

Volkswagen CFO Nominated as Board Chairman

The largest shareholder of European’s biggest auto maker nominated the company’s finance chief to become the next chairman of the VW supervisory board.

Iran Parliament to Decide on Nuclear Deal

Iran’s parliament will have the final say on approving or rejecting the landmark nuclear agreement forged with world powers in July, top Iranian officials said, raising fresh uncertainty about the deal.

Brussels Beat

EU Displaces U.S. as Top Antitrust Cop

The European Union’s antitrust activism has put it in prime position to shape the Internet and is encouraging some U.S. technology executives to focus on Brussels.

ECB Willing to Expand Stimulus Amid Growth Worry

ECB President Mario Draghi indicated that the bank stands ready to expand its stimulus programs and projected slower-than-expected economic growth in the eurozone, as well as lower inflation rates.

Jobs Report Could Seal Deal on Rates

The August employment report could make or break the case for the Federal Reserve raising rates this month.

E-Book Sales Weaken Amid Higher Prices

E-book revenue is falling, and some people in the publishing industry say it is partly because of the higher prices that have resulted from new contracts negotiated with Amazon.

Former Saab Board Members Hit With Forgery Charges

Former CEO Jan-Ake Jonsson and head lawyer Kristina Geers deny falsifying data to justify huge payments before car maker went bankrupt.

Vivendi Chairman Ousts Longtime Chief of Canal Plus

French billionaire and Vivendi Chairman Vincent Bolloré has ousted the longtime chief of Canal Plus, further tightening his grip over the Vivendi-owned pay-television group amid falling subscriber numbers.

Novartis to Begin Selling Copy of Amgen’s Neupogen in U.S.

Novartis said it will begin selling the first biosimilar drug in the U.S. at a 15% discount to the original after an appeals court denied Amgen’s request to block the Swiss drug maker’s sale of its copycat version of blockbuster remedy Neupogen.

A delay in guidelines encouraging gas stations to upgrade their equipment leaves them more vulnerable to credit-card fraud than other sectors.

A delay in guidelines encouraging gas stations to upgrade their equipment leaves them more vulnerable to credit-card fraud than other sectors.

Credit-Card Fraudsters Pump Gas Stations for Profit

As motorists head out on the last big driving weekend of the summer, the credit-card industry and gas-station owners are deploying everything from sophisticated software to heavy-duty padlocks to combat an epidemic of fuel-related theft and fraud. 70

Private-Equity Firms Plunge Back Into the Oil Patch

Private-equity firms are doubling down on energy, despite heavy damage from their last adventure in the sector.

Traders Ride the ETF Roller Coaster

Mom-and-pop investors who trade in exchange-traded funds and notes linked to commodities have experienced some of the roughest volatility over the past several weeks.

ECB’s Draghi: It Ain’t Easy Ahead of the Fed

Mario Draghi promised that the European Central Bank was ready to boost quantitative easing as soon as necessary to help the eurozone economy.

Middle East Crossroads

Yemen’s Unity Frays in Leaderless Aden

The battles of recent months have reopened historic divisions between Yemen’s north and south, writes Yaroslav Trofimov.

French Prosecutor Confirms Airplane Part in Reunion Belongs to MH370

A top French prosecutor confirmed the airplane debris that recently washed ashore on the French island of Reunion came from the Malaysia Airlines’ missing Boeing 777.

NATO Opens Post in Lithuania

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization inaugurated a new command post in Lithuania, one of six across the alliance’s eastern border meant to shore up the region’s defenses against Russia.

French Government Pledges More Help for Farmers

France’s government has pledged to increase aid for agriculture, after thousands of farmers converged on Paris and blocked the city’s streets with more than 1,500 tractors to protest against high costs and low prices.

Off Duty

Adventure & Travel

Not Far From Prague, a Czech Village Worth Rhapsodizing About

The frozen-in-time town of Český Krumlov has scenery and history—and beer—that keeps travelers coming back.

Arts

Film Review

‘La Jaula de Oro (The Golden Dream)’ Review: Dark Immigrant Odyssey

In Diego Quemada-Diez’s celebrated directorial debut, a trio of teenagers flee from Guatemala and make their way through a treacherous Mexico, where police and gangsters prey on vulnerable travelers.

20 Odd Questions

Manolo Blahnik on Old Films and Kate Moss

The shoe designer on what he’d blow his money on, the drama behind Kate Moss’s wedding shoes and exactly how he feels about fake Manolos.

Video

Father of Drowned Syrian Boy Describes His Sorrow

1:52

Tesla's New Model X SUV Finally Set for Delivery

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Are Baby Monitor Flaws Inviting Hackers Into Homes?

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Fashion

What’s Your Sport-Coat Personality?

Designers are pushing the boundaries of the sport coat with ‘soft’ jackets and sweater hybrids, encouraging men to leave their comfort zones and try bolder styles; a guide to the new world of sport coats.

A Modigliani Painting for $100 Million?

Christie’s International said it expects to ask roughly $100 million for a Modigliani nude that will be auctioned this fall, a bold reflection of how prices for blue-chip paintings have skyrocketed in recent seasons.

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WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Werden deutsche Smartphones wieder dümmer?

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Die Nutzung von Smartphones ist stark gestiegen – immerhin gibt des die günstigsten Geräte heute so billig wie einst normale Handys. Doch viele der Geräte werden in Zukunft gar nicht „smart“ genutzt, glaubt Deloitte – weil sie nie so gut wie mit dem Internet verbunden sind.

Die Unternehmensberatung sagt in ihren „Deloitte TMT Predictions 2013“ für Ende des Jahres einen Smartphone-Bestand von 60 Millionen Geräten in Deutschland voraus – mit anderen Worten besitzt dann fast jeder Deutsche eins. Doch 15 Millionen davon werden der Prognose zufolge weniger als einmal im Monat mit dem Internet verbunden, weitere drei Millionen nur via WLAN und nicht unterwegs mit Mobilfunkvertrag. Obwohl es sich technisch gesehen um Smartphones handelt, erfüllen sie lediglich die Funktionen älterer Handymodelle wie Telefonieren, SMS schreiben und dem Erstellen von Fotos.#

Nicht mehr nur was für “Early Adopter”

Hätten bislang vor allem die technikaffinen „Early Adopter“ zu Smartphones gegriffen, erobern die Geräte zunehmend auch die Nutzerschaft, die weniger technikbegeistert ist – alleine schon weil das Angebot an hochwertigen Nicht-Smartphones immer kleiner wird. Deloitte erwartet nun eine steigende Zahl von einfachen Einstiegsgeräten, die weniger können und leichter zu bedienen sind. Auch, dass alte Smartphones an oft ohne Vertrag weitergegeben werden, beispielsweise auch bei Kindern, spiele eine Rolle.

Viele Neubesitzer seien weder von den zusätzlichen Gerätefunktionen überzeugt noch bereit, die hohen Kosten von mobilen Datentarifen zu zahlen. Doch Deloitte sieht einen Ausweg: „All-you-can-App“-Tarife – Datenflatrates, die nur für bestimmte Anwendungen gelten, statt Zugriff auf das gesamte Internet zu gewähren. Das kommt Kunden entgegen, die weder das gesamte Internet nutzen wollen noch bereit sind, die dafür meist noch hohen monatlichen Kosten zu tragen.

Deloitte sagt “All-you-can-app”-Tarife voraus

Deloitte sagt voraus, dass 2013 weltweit 100 Mobilfunkanbieter “All-you-can-app”-Tarife einführen werden. Damit würden die Kunden einen preisgünstigen Datentarif mit gedeckelten Kosten bekommen und die Netzbetreiber profitieren von der Beschränkung der freien Datennutzung auf bestimmte Dienste.

Denn die sogenannten Datentarif-Flatrates der Mobilfunkprovider sind bislang gar keine echten Flatrates: Hat der Mobilfunkkunde ein bestimmtes, häufig noch niedrig limitiertes Datenvolumen aufgebraucht, wird sein Zugang gedrosselt. Die Nutzung mobiler Video- und Musikstreaming-Dienste ist so bei den meisten heutigen mobilen Datentarifen kaum praktikabel.

Deloitte zitiert internationale Beispiele für den „All-you-can-App“-Ansatz. So bietet Vodafone in Spanien unbegrenzten Zugriff auf unterschiedliche TV-Kanäle. Bei der Deutsche Telekom ist in den 10 Euro, die sie für den Zugriff auf den Musikdienste Spotify verlangt, die Datennutzung in unbegrenzter Höhe bereits enthalten.

Letztlich profitieren davon sowohl App-Anbieter als auch Mobilfunkprovider. Die genaue Ausgestaltung des Vertragswerks zwischen Spotify und der Telekom ist nicht bekannt. Branchenexperten gehen aber laut Deloitte davon aus, dass sich die Zahlungsströme zwischen den beiden Unternehmen in etwa ausgleichen, das Ganze also faktisch ein Nullsummenspiel ist.

Außerhalb Europas werde Schwerpunkt dagegen eher auf Messaging-Diensten wie WhatsApp oder Internet-Telefonie (Voice over IP, kurz VoIP) liegen. Insbesondere für das außereuropäische Ausland erwartet Deloitte die Vermarktung von mobilen VoIP-Diensten und Messaging in Verbindung mit “All-you-can-App”.

Deutsche besonders interessiert

Eine aktuelle Befragung von Deloitte zeigt, dass das Interesse an solchen App-spezifischen Tarifen in Deutschland besonders groß sei. 47 Prozent der Deutschen würden demnach solche Tarife buchen – während es in Großbritannien und den USA jeweils nur 32 Prozent sind.

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Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Image of Syrian Boy Echoes Around World

The 3-year-old was a Syrian Kurd whose relatives’ efforts to emigrate to Canada had been rebuffed, according to media and Kurdish activists. 591

Migrant Crisis Divides Europe

Germany and France press the rest of Europe to end squabbling over its exploding numbers of refugees as Hungarian leader says his country doesn’t want ‘a large number of Muslim people.’

Volkswagen CFO Nominated as Board Chairman

The largest shareholder of European’s biggest auto maker nominated the company’s finance chief to become the next chairman of the VW supervisory board.

Iran Parliament to Decide on Nuclear Deal

Iran’s parliament will have the final say on approving or rejecting the landmark nuclear agreement forged with world powers in July, top Iranian officials said, raising fresh uncertainty about the deal.

Brussels Beat

EU Displaces U.S. as Top Antitrust Cop

The European Union’s antitrust activism has put it in prime position to shape the Internet and is encouraging some U.S. technology executives to focus on Brussels.

ECB Willing to Expand Stimulus Amid Growth Worry

ECB President Mario Draghi indicated that the bank stands ready to expand its stimulus programs and projected slower-than-expected economic growth in the eurozone, as well as lower inflation rates.

Jobs Report Could Seal Deal on Rates

The August employment report could make or break the case for the Federal Reserve raising rates this month.

E-Book Sales Weaken Amid Higher Prices

E-book revenue is falling, and some people in the publishing industry say it is partly because of the higher prices that have resulted from new contracts negotiated with Amazon.

Former Saab Board Members Hit With Forgery Charges

Former CEO Jan-Ake Jonsson and head lawyer Kristina Geers deny falsifying data to justify huge payments before car maker went bankrupt.

Vivendi Chairman Ousts Longtime Chief of Canal Plus

French billionaire and Vivendi Chairman Vincent Bolloré has ousted the longtime chief of Canal Plus, further tightening his grip over the Vivendi-owned pay-television group amid falling subscriber numbers.

Novartis to Begin Selling Copy of Amgen’s Neupogen in U.S.

Novartis said it will begin selling the first biosimilar drug in the U.S. at a 15% discount to the original after an appeals court denied Amgen’s request to block the Swiss drug maker’s sale of its copycat version of blockbuster remedy Neupogen.

A delay in guidelines encouraging gas stations to upgrade their equipment leaves them more vulnerable to credit-card fraud than other sectors.

A delay in guidelines encouraging gas stations to upgrade their equipment leaves them more vulnerable to credit-card fraud than other sectors.

Credit-Card Fraudsters Pump Gas Stations for Profit

As motorists head out on the last big driving weekend of the summer, the credit-card industry and gas-station owners are deploying everything from sophisticated software to heavy-duty padlocks to combat an epidemic of fuel-related theft and fraud. 70

Private-Equity Firms Plunge Back Into the Oil Patch

Private-equity firms are doubling down on energy, despite heavy damage from their last adventure in the sector.

Traders Ride the ETF Roller Coaster

Mom-and-pop investors who trade in exchange-traded funds and notes linked to commodities have experienced some of the roughest volatility over the past several weeks.

ECB’s Draghi: It Ain’t Easy Ahead of the Fed

Mario Draghi promised that the European Central Bank was ready to boost quantitative easing as soon as necessary to help the eurozone economy.

Middle East Crossroads

Yemen’s Unity Frays in Leaderless Aden

The battles of recent months have reopened historic divisions between Yemen’s north and south, writes Yaroslav Trofimov.

French Prosecutor Confirms Airplane Part in Reunion Belongs to MH370

A top French prosecutor confirmed the airplane debris that recently washed ashore on the French island of Reunion came from the Malaysia Airlines’ missing Boeing 777.

NATO Opens Post in Lithuania

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization inaugurated a new command post in Lithuania, one of six across the alliance’s eastern border meant to shore up the region’s defenses against Russia.

French Government Pledges More Help for Farmers

France’s government has pledged to increase aid for agriculture, after thousands of farmers converged on Paris and blocked the city’s streets with more than 1,500 tractors to protest against high costs and low prices.

Off Duty

Adventure & Travel

Not Far From Prague, a Czech Village Worth Rhapsodizing About

The frozen-in-time town of Český Krumlov has scenery and history—and beer—that keeps travelers coming back.

Arts

Film Review

‘La Jaula de Oro (The Golden Dream)’ Review: Dark Immigrant Odyssey

In Diego Quemada-Diez’s celebrated directorial debut, a trio of teenagers flee from Guatemala and make their way through a treacherous Mexico, where police and gangsters prey on vulnerable travelers.

20 Odd Questions

Manolo Blahnik on Old Films and Kate Moss

The shoe designer on what he’d blow his money on, the drama behind Kate Moss’s wedding shoes and exactly how he feels about fake Manolos.

Video

Father of Drowned Syrian Boy Describes His Sorrow

1:52

Tesla's New Model X SUV Finally Set for Delivery

2:25

Are Baby Monitor Flaws Inviting Hackers Into Homes?

3:45