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Weak Chinese Data Rattle Markets

Global stock markets tumbled after weak manufacturing data in China fueled investors’ worries about the world’s second-largest economy.

Migrants Protest as Hungary Closes Main Station to Northern Europe

Hungarian authorities cleared hundreds of migrants from the country’s main international railway station where they were waiting to board trains to Austria and Germany, prompting protests.

Greek Polls Suggest Tough Election Test for Tsipras

Opinion polls show support for Greece’s left-wing Syriza party and its leader, Alexis Tsipras, crumbling. But Syriza retains a lead over its opponents and the Sept. 20 election could be tight.

Russia Puts Off Data Showdown With Technology Firms

Facebook, Google and Twitter are among the U.S. companies that are getting more time to comply with a new law requiring Russian data centers.

Inside Kellogg’s Effort to Cash In on the Health-Food Craze

Fixing its Kashi brand, says the CEO, is key to bulking up sales in the fast-growing natural and organic food aisles. Kellogg also needs to overcome weakness in its cereal-driven U.S. morning-foods division. The efforts are part of a broader push to revive the 109-year old firm.

Largest Batch of Clinton Emails Released

Newly released emails from Hillary Clinton show that former Clinton White House aide Sidney Blumenthal remained a political confidant and correspondent throughout her time as secretary of state. 202

China’s Economic Woes Echo Across Asia

Evidence gathered pace on Tuesday that China’s economic slowdown is rippling across Asia, including a startling plunge in South Korean exports and softening manufacturing in Malaysia and Vietnam.

Samsung Takes Smartwatch Fight to Apple

Samsung plans to unveil a new smartwatch, as the company attempts to prove that it can outshine Apple on design in a nascent product category.

Startups Put Data in Farmers’ Hands

Farmers and startups like Farmobile and Granular are starting to compete with agribusiness giants over the newest commodity being harvested on U.S. farms: data.

Apple and Cisco Unveil a Business Partnership

Apple and Cisco Systems are teaming up to help bring more iPhones and iPads to business users.

Google, Sanofi Team Up on Diabetes Research

The Internet company said its health-care research unit plans to work with European pharmaceutical major Sanofi on new ways to monitor and treat the condition.

Iran Deal Could Open Door to Gulf Businesses

While executives in the Gulf see opportunities, the region’s governments remain at loggerheads on other issues.

StubHub Gets Out of ‘All-In’ Pricing

Nearly two years after shifting to “all-in” pricing, ticket-resale giant StubHub is reversing course and returning to its old system of adding 15% to 17% at the last minute.

Etsy Faces Pressure to Abandon Irish Tax Strategy

Americans for Tax Fairness, a progressive advocacy group, is pressing Etsy, the online crafts marketplace, to abandon a strategy that uses an Irish subsidiary to minimize taxes it owes to Uncle Sam.

Valeant Strikes Psoriasis-Drug Pact With AstraZeneca

Canada’s Valeant Pharmaceuticals has struck a deal with AstraZeneca of the U.K. to develop and sell psoriasis treatment brodalumab.

Former Alabama Governor George Wallace ran as a third-party candidate in the 1968 presidential election and won five states.

Sanders, Trump et al: Partying Like It’s 1968

Strange happenings are afoot in the 2016 presidential cycle, ones that draw parallels with 1968, when a disruptive race so shook up the political system that we’re still feeling its aftershocks today, Gerald F. Seib writes. 320

Ukrainian National Guard Officer Killed, Dozens Injured in Protest Blast

One member of Ukraine’s National Guard was killed and at least 69 others were injured outside the country’s parliament, as fighting broke out between protesters and law-enforcement officers.

White House Readying Sanctions Plan Against Chinese Firms for Cybertheft

The White House is preparing a menu of sanctions against Chinese state-owned enterprises and private companies that officials believe benefited from the cybertheft of U.S. corporate secrets.

Deadly Explosions Highlight China Workplace Dangers

A second deadly chemical blast in a month is shining a spotlight on workplace accidents in China, where worker deaths still number in the tens of thousands annually.

Crackdown on Racial Bias Boosts Some Auto-Loan Costs

A federal regulator’s campaign to fight bias against minorities is changing the way many car loans are priced, a move that is increasing costs for some consumers. 155

Service Providers See Gold in Shares of Startups

Branding firm Red Antler is among vendors that are looking to profit on the soaring valuations of young startups by taking payment in stock instead of cash.

Commerzbank to Start Operations in Brazil

Germany’s Commerzbank received authorization from the Brazil’s central bank to operate in Latin America’s largest nation, where it will focus on small and medium-size German and European companies.

Portuguese Central Bank Ends Talks With Anbang Over Novo Banco Sale

Portugal’s central bank will now enter talks with another bidder for the Portuguese bank created out of failed lender Banco Espírito Santo last year.

U.S. Banks Edging Out European Rivals in Europe

U.S. banks are edging out their European banking rivals on their home turf.

Video

Ukraine Protest Blast Kills Officer, Injures Dozens

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Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

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Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

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What to Watch for After Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is afflicting more people, and research shows patients who have had non-melanoma skin cancers are at increased risk of recurrence.

IMAGE 1 of 12

Video Music Awards 2015

Kanye West gave a long rant at the MTV Video Music Awards as he apologized to Taylor Swift for taking her microphone in 2009. Swift presented West with the Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award. Earlier, she and Nicki Minaj buried their beef by joining forces onstage.

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Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Facebook und die Schleswig-Holstein-Frage: Gibt es ein Recht auf Online-Anonymität?

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Zuletzt stand Schleswig-Holstein derart in den internationalen Schlagzeilen, als es im 19. Jahrhundert Zentrum des Kampfes zwischen Dänemark, Preußen und Österreich stand. Damals soll der britische Politiker Lord Palmerston gesagt haben, dass die Schleswig-Holstein-Frage so kompliziert sei, dass sie höchstens drei Männer in Europa jemals verstanden haben. „Einer davon war Prinz Albert, der tot ist. Der zweite war ein deutscher Professor, der verrückt wurde. Ich bin der dritte – und ich habe alles darüber vergessen“, scherzte der britische Lord seinerzeit.

Nun hat ein Mann das nördlichste Bundesland zurück in die Schlagzeilen gebracht: Thilo Weichert, der Landesdatenschutzbeauftragte von Schleswig-Holstein. Er hat eine Frage aufgeworfen, die so kompliziert ist, dass sie die ursprüngliche Schleswig-Holstein-Frage wie einen Kindergeburtstag aussehen lässt.

Im Dezember 2012 drohte Weichert Facebook erstmals mit einem Zwangsgeld, weil das Unternehmen die anonyme und pseudonyme Nutzung des sozialen Netzwerks nicht zulässt – was nach Auffassung Weicherts gegen deutsche Gesetze verstößt.  Inzwischen sind auch internationale Medien darauf aufmerksam geworden.

Facebook spricht von Steuergeldverschwendung

Facebook widerspricht Weichert. „Wir glauben, dass die Anweisungen sinnlos und eine Verschwendung von Steuergeldern sind, und wir werden uns ihnen energisch widersetzen“, heißt es vom Unternehmen. Doch in dieser Auseinandersetzung steckt mehr als die altbekannte Geschichte „Europäisches Land ist auf einen großen US-Konzern sauer“. Es geht hier um den Kern einer alten Internetdebatte: Haben wir das Recht auf Online-Anonymität?

Die Frage hat weitreichende Konsequenzen auch auf das normale Leben. Das irische Parlament untersucht die Rolle sozialer Internetmedien bei dem Selbstmord des irischen Politikers Shane McEntree. McEntree nahm sich nach einer Hetzkampagne das Leben, bei der auch sozialen Medien wie Facebook eine Rolle spielten.

Richard Allan, Directer of Policy von Facebook in Europa, verteidigt das Bestehen auf Klarnamen rigoros. Dem Unternehmen zufolge ist die Realname-Politik sowohl der Sicherheit als auch der zivilen Debattenkultur förderlich. „Wir tun das, weil es Grundlage dessen ist, was unsere Community definiert“, sagte er. „Sie soll dem echten Leben entsprechen. Dort würde man ja auch niemanden darüber belügen, wer man ist.“

Auch in der echten Welt gibt es Pseudonyme

dapd
Thilo Weichert.

Laut Simon Davies, ehemaliger Partner an der London School of Economics und Gründer der Organisation Privacy International, lässt Facebook bei seiner Darstellung von Interaktionen in der echten Welt aber einiges weg. „In der echten Welt gibt es unzählige Momente, in denen wir unseren Gegenüber nur per Pseudonym oder mit ihrer öffentlichen Identität kennen“, sagte er. „Wir entwickeln verschiedene Ebenen sozialer Interaktion. Wenn Facebook wirklich die volle Bandbreite der sozialen Interaktion ermöglichen will, die man beispielsweise in einer Kneipe findet, dann müssen sie Pseudonyme erlauben. Es gibt Leute, die nur mit ihrem Spitznamen bekannt sind. Wir können trotzdem ganz real mit diesen Leuten reden.“

Es komme darauf an, was wir wollen, sagt Davies. „Man muss unterscheiden, was Mechanismen für einen guten sozialen Austausch und was Mechanismen für ein sicheres soziales Netzwerk sind. Das ist nicht dasselbe.“

Brooke Magnanti schreibt heute für die Londoner Zeitung Daily Telegraph. Zuvor allerdings war sie Callgirl und schrieb einen Blog unter dem Pseudonym Belle de Jour über ihr Leben als Prostituierte. Sie sagt, dass der Verlust des Rechts auf Anonymität schwerer wiegen würde als jeder mögliche Schaden, der durch die missbräuchliche Nutzung von Anonymität entstehen kann.

Kritik im Schutz der Anonymität

Im Großbritannien der frühen 1660er Jahren unter der Regenschaft von König Charles II „wurde ein Drucker mit dem Namen John Twyn mit dem Tode bestraft, weil er den Namen eines anonymen Autors nicht nennen wollte, der kritisch über den König geschrieben hatte“, sagt Magnati. Zu allen Zeiten sei Anonymität genutzt worden, um repressive und autokratische Regierungen zu kritisieren.

„Wenn es um illegale Aktivitäten geht, werden Leute das Gesetz brechen – unabhängig davon, ob wir ihre Namen kennen. Für solche Fälle gibt es bereits Gesetze, wir brauchen nicht noch mehr“, sagt sie. Ihrer Meinung nach sollten die Gesetze nicht nur deshalb geändert werden, weil es eine neue und häufig missverstandene Technologie gibt.

Stört die eine Milliarde Facebook-Nutzer die fehlende Anonymität? Ganz und gar nicht. Die häufigste Beschwerde, die das Unternehmen derzeit bekommt, ist nicht, dass man keine anonyme Nutzung zulässt, sondern das genaue Gegenteil, sagt Allan. „Die Beschwerden, die wir bekommen, haben ganz häufig mit Nutzern zu tun, die falsche Identitäten auf Facebook nutzen. Ernsthafte Beschwerden von Nutzern,  die sich gerne als jemand anders präsentieren würden, gibt es nicht. Sie kommen von Aktivisten und Behörden, nicht von normalen Nutzern, deren Interesse das genaue Gegenteil ist.“

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Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Weak Chinese Data Rattle Markets

Global stock markets tumbled after weak manufacturing data in China fueled investors’ worries about the world’s second-largest economy.

Migrants Protest as Hungary Closes Main Station to Northern Europe

Hungarian authorities cleared hundreds of migrants from the country’s main international railway station where they were waiting to board trains to Austria and Germany, prompting protests.

Greek Polls Suggest Tough Election Test for Tsipras

Opinion polls show support for Greece’s left-wing Syriza party and its leader, Alexis Tsipras, crumbling. But Syriza retains a lead over its opponents and the Sept. 20 election could be tight.

Russia Puts Off Data Showdown With Technology Firms

Facebook, Google and Twitter are among the U.S. companies that are getting more time to comply with a new law requiring Russian data centers.

Inside Kellogg’s Effort to Cash In on the Health-Food Craze

Fixing its Kashi brand, says the CEO, is key to bulking up sales in the fast-growing natural and organic food aisles. Kellogg also needs to overcome weakness in its cereal-driven U.S. morning-foods division. The efforts are part of a broader push to revive the 109-year old firm.

Largest Batch of Clinton Emails Released

Newly released emails from Hillary Clinton show that former Clinton White House aide Sidney Blumenthal remained a political confidant and correspondent throughout her time as secretary of state. 202

China’s Economic Woes Echo Across Asia

Evidence gathered pace on Tuesday that China’s economic slowdown is rippling across Asia, including a startling plunge in South Korean exports and softening manufacturing in Malaysia and Vietnam.

Samsung Takes Smartwatch Fight to Apple

Samsung plans to unveil a new smartwatch, as the company attempts to prove that it can outshine Apple on design in a nascent product category.

Startups Put Data in Farmers’ Hands

Farmers and startups like Farmobile and Granular are starting to compete with agribusiness giants over the newest commodity being harvested on U.S. farms: data.

Apple and Cisco Unveil a Business Partnership

Apple and Cisco Systems are teaming up to help bring more iPhones and iPads to business users.

Google, Sanofi Team Up on Diabetes Research

The Internet company said its health-care research unit plans to work with European pharmaceutical major Sanofi on new ways to monitor and treat the condition.

Iran Deal Could Open Door to Gulf Businesses

While executives in the Gulf see opportunities, the region’s governments remain at loggerheads on other issues.

StubHub Gets Out of ‘All-In’ Pricing

Nearly two years after shifting to “all-in” pricing, ticket-resale giant StubHub is reversing course and returning to its old system of adding 15% to 17% at the last minute.

Etsy Faces Pressure to Abandon Irish Tax Strategy

Americans for Tax Fairness, a progressive advocacy group, is pressing Etsy, the online crafts marketplace, to abandon a strategy that uses an Irish subsidiary to minimize taxes it owes to Uncle Sam.

Valeant Strikes Psoriasis-Drug Pact With AstraZeneca

Canada’s Valeant Pharmaceuticals has struck a deal with AstraZeneca of the U.K. to develop and sell psoriasis treatment brodalumab.

Former Alabama Governor George Wallace ran as a third-party candidate in the 1968 presidential election and won five states.

Sanders, Trump et al: Partying Like It’s 1968

Strange happenings are afoot in the 2016 presidential cycle, ones that draw parallels with 1968, when a disruptive race so shook up the political system that we’re still feeling its aftershocks today, Gerald F. Seib writes. 320

Ukrainian National Guard Officer Killed, Dozens Injured in Protest Blast

One member of Ukraine’s National Guard was killed and at least 69 others were injured outside the country’s parliament, as fighting broke out between protesters and law-enforcement officers.

White House Readying Sanctions Plan Against Chinese Firms for Cybertheft

The White House is preparing a menu of sanctions against Chinese state-owned enterprises and private companies that officials believe benefited from the cybertheft of U.S. corporate secrets.

Deadly Explosions Highlight China Workplace Dangers

A second deadly chemical blast in a month is shining a spotlight on workplace accidents in China, where worker deaths still number in the tens of thousands annually.

Crackdown on Racial Bias Boosts Some Auto-Loan Costs

A federal regulator’s campaign to fight bias against minorities is changing the way many car loans are priced, a move that is increasing costs for some consumers. 155

Service Providers See Gold in Shares of Startups

Branding firm Red Antler is among vendors that are looking to profit on the soaring valuations of young startups by taking payment in stock instead of cash.

Commerzbank to Start Operations in Brazil

Germany’s Commerzbank received authorization from the Brazil’s central bank to operate in Latin America’s largest nation, where it will focus on small and medium-size German and European companies.

Portuguese Central Bank Ends Talks With Anbang Over Novo Banco Sale

Portugal’s central bank will now enter talks with another bidder for the Portuguese bank created out of failed lender Banco Espírito Santo last year.

U.S. Banks Edging Out European Rivals in Europe

U.S. banks are edging out their European banking rivals on their home turf.

Video

Ukraine Protest Blast Kills Officer, Injures Dozens

0:45

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11