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Stocks Fall After Volatile Week

U.S. stocks declined on Friday afternoon at the end of one of the most volatile weeks in years for global markets. 91

Four Arrested in Hungary Over Migrant Truck Deaths

Flowers were placed where dozens of migrants were found dead.

Hungarian police said they had arrested four men after 71 migrants were found dead in a truck across the border in Austria on Thursday. 86

Hacker Killed by Drone Was Islamic State’s ‘Secret Weapon’

That Islamic State’s Junaid Hussain was targeted directly by the U.S. and U.K. shows the extent to which digital warfare has upset the balance of power on the modern battlefield. 203

Brazil’s Big Bet on China Turns Sour

Brazil’s big bet on China is turning sour as the Asian country’s once voracious appetite for Brazilian exports dims.

U.S. special-operations forces in Afghanistan are trying to make sure their elite Afghan counterparts can fight on their own before American troops leave, which is planned to take place by the end of next year. Photo: Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. special-operations forces in Afghanistan are trying to make sure their elite Afghan counterparts can fight on their own before American troops leave, which is planned to take place by the end of next year. Photo: Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images

Treading Line Between War and Peace, U.S. Special Forces Groom Afghan Troops

Special-operations units are trying to get their local counterparts ready for combat before American troops leave Afghanistan.

Fed Urged to Press Ahead With Rate Rise

After months of forewarning by the Fed that it is preparing to raise short-term interest rates, some international officials have a message: Get on with it already. 78

Big Oil Faces Prospect of Lower Refining Profits

For much of the past year, the world’s biggest energy companies suffered through an oil-price rout with one silver lining: Their little-loved refineries were churning out big profits again. Now, that bright spot could be fading, even as oil prices sink.

IMAGE 1 of 9

‘Craft’ Bourbon Is in the Eye of the Distiller

“Craft” distilleries have mushroomed in the U.S. to 588 from 51 over the past decade. Feeling the heat from the new competition, global liquor conglomerates are getting in on the act, and not letting definitions get in the way.

Syngenta Shareholders Not Happy

Some Syngenta AG shareholders are angry over the rejection of takeover proposals from rival Monsanto Co., which then walked away.

Hermès Plays Down China Luxury Risk

French luxury-goods company Hermès International said it expects demand for its pricey handbags and fashion to remain resilient and grow 8% this year despite the risk of an economic slowdown in China.

Luxury Brands Push Deeper Into India

As sales growth slows in China and other big markets, luxury-goods makers are seeking to cash in on patches of new wealth in often-unexpected parts of India, where there is a growing appetite for luxury brands.

‘Flash Crash’ Trader Denied Extradition Delay

British trader Navinder Sarao had requested a two-month delay in his extradition hearing.

Labor Group Says BofA CEO Moynihan Should Not be Chairman

A labor group is urging Bank of America shareholders to vote against a bylaw change that allows Brian Moynihan to hold the dual titles of bank CEO and chairman.

Oil Prices Resume Rally

Oil prices rose Friday, erasing earlier losses, as a surprise one-day rally extended to a second day.

How Do You Short China?

Traders are scouring stock, bond and currency markets for ways to make money on the malaise afflicting China. Some are piling into insurance-like contracts that would pay out if the country defaulted on a small pool of its foreign-denominated bonds.

Lebanon’s youth-led “You Stink” movement initially formed as a protest against mounds of uncollected garbage in Beirut. Now it wants political change.

Anger Over Garbage in Lebanon Blossoms into Demands for Reform

Calls for political reform, however, collide with country’s entrenched, sectarian-based political system.

China’s World

Markets? To Xi Jinping, Another Battle Comes First

Those who think a wilting economy and stock-market turmoil may divert Xi Jinping’s focus from his anticorruption campaign misunderstand his priorities, writes Andrew Browne.

Syriza’s Poll Lead Narrows Ahead of Election

Greece’s left-wing Syriza party is leading ahead of next month’s elections, a poll published Friday shows, though the gap with the conservative New Democracy party has closed considerably.

Ukraine’s U.S.-Born Finance Minister Praised for Persistence

Natalie Jaresko led months of tense negotiations with creditors, clocking thousands of air miles to reach a debt-relief deal that should help secure further bailout funds from the International Monetary Fund.

Russia

Moscow Strains To Upgrade Forces

Even as the country projects a muscular image, a falling ruble and weaker economy has forced President Vladimir Putin to scale back ambitious plans to modernize the military. 63

Mansion

A Swedish Couple’s Lakeside Oasis

Entrepreneur Olof Sköld and his partner, Helene Carson, build a retreat for their family

Technology

Pentagon Advances Partnership with Tech Firms for Flexible Electronics

The Pentagon is announcing that it will contribute seed money to a consortium of Silicon Valley firms to develop what defense officials say is a promising new technology incorporating “flexible” electronics.

China’s Moves Won’t Help U.S. Tech Firms

China’s moves to spur its slowing economy are having an important but less obvious effect on the tech sector: Strengthening local companies that were already making life difficult for U.S. rivals.

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09

On Wine: Will Lyons

Why Gin Is Back With a Flourish

Gin is experiencing the kind of boom the wine industry experienced in the mid-1980s, as boutique-distilled bottles with names like Half Hitch, Opihr and Ransom Old Tom give the classic G&T a new—and flavorful—twist

Music

Foals’ ‘What Went Down’ Is a Visceral Confessional

Yannis Philippakis, the lead singer whose energetic stage presence and novelistic lyrics have made Foals one of British rock’s most compelling propositions, talks about the band’s fourth album.

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Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Facebook und die Schleswig-Holstein-Frage: Gibt es ein Recht auf Online-Anonymität?

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Zuletzt stand Schleswig-Holstein derart in den internationalen Schlagzeilen, als es im 19. Jahrhundert Zentrum des Kampfes zwischen Dänemark, Preußen und Österreich stand. Damals soll der britische Politiker Lord Palmerston gesagt haben, dass die Schleswig-Holstein-Frage so kompliziert sei, dass sie höchstens drei Männer in Europa jemals verstanden haben. „Einer davon war Prinz Albert, der tot ist. Der zweite war ein deutscher Professor, der verrückt wurde. Ich bin der dritte – und ich habe alles darüber vergessen“, scherzte der britische Lord seinerzeit.

Nun hat ein Mann das nördlichste Bundesland zurück in die Schlagzeilen gebracht: Thilo Weichert, der Landesdatenschutzbeauftragte von Schleswig-Holstein. Er hat eine Frage aufgeworfen, die so kompliziert ist, dass sie die ursprüngliche Schleswig-Holstein-Frage wie einen Kindergeburtstag aussehen lässt.

Im Dezember 2012 drohte Weichert Facebook erstmals mit einem Zwangsgeld, weil das Unternehmen die anonyme und pseudonyme Nutzung des sozialen Netzwerks nicht zulässt – was nach Auffassung Weicherts gegen deutsche Gesetze verstößt.  Inzwischen sind auch internationale Medien darauf aufmerksam geworden.

Facebook spricht von Steuergeldverschwendung

Facebook widerspricht Weichert. „Wir glauben, dass die Anweisungen sinnlos und eine Verschwendung von Steuergeldern sind, und wir werden uns ihnen energisch widersetzen“, heißt es vom Unternehmen. Doch in dieser Auseinandersetzung steckt mehr als die altbekannte Geschichte „Europäisches Land ist auf einen großen US-Konzern sauer“. Es geht hier um den Kern einer alten Internetdebatte: Haben wir das Recht auf Online-Anonymität?

Die Frage hat weitreichende Konsequenzen auch auf das normale Leben. Das irische Parlament untersucht die Rolle sozialer Internetmedien bei dem Selbstmord des irischen Politikers Shane McEntree. McEntree nahm sich nach einer Hetzkampagne das Leben, bei der auch sozialen Medien wie Facebook eine Rolle spielten.

Richard Allan, Directer of Policy von Facebook in Europa, verteidigt das Bestehen auf Klarnamen rigoros. Dem Unternehmen zufolge ist die Realname-Politik sowohl der Sicherheit als auch der zivilen Debattenkultur förderlich. „Wir tun das, weil es Grundlage dessen ist, was unsere Community definiert“, sagte er. „Sie soll dem echten Leben entsprechen. Dort würde man ja auch niemanden darüber belügen, wer man ist.“

Auch in der echten Welt gibt es Pseudonyme

dapd
Thilo Weichert.

Laut Simon Davies, ehemaliger Partner an der London School of Economics und Gründer der Organisation Privacy International, lässt Facebook bei seiner Darstellung von Interaktionen in der echten Welt aber einiges weg. „In der echten Welt gibt es unzählige Momente, in denen wir unseren Gegenüber nur per Pseudonym oder mit ihrer öffentlichen Identität kennen“, sagte er. „Wir entwickeln verschiedene Ebenen sozialer Interaktion. Wenn Facebook wirklich die volle Bandbreite der sozialen Interaktion ermöglichen will, die man beispielsweise in einer Kneipe findet, dann müssen sie Pseudonyme erlauben. Es gibt Leute, die nur mit ihrem Spitznamen bekannt sind. Wir können trotzdem ganz real mit diesen Leuten reden.“

Es komme darauf an, was wir wollen, sagt Davies. „Man muss unterscheiden, was Mechanismen für einen guten sozialen Austausch und was Mechanismen für ein sicheres soziales Netzwerk sind. Das ist nicht dasselbe.“

Brooke Magnanti schreibt heute für die Londoner Zeitung Daily Telegraph. Zuvor allerdings war sie Callgirl und schrieb einen Blog unter dem Pseudonym Belle de Jour über ihr Leben als Prostituierte. Sie sagt, dass der Verlust des Rechts auf Anonymität schwerer wiegen würde als jeder mögliche Schaden, der durch die missbräuchliche Nutzung von Anonymität entstehen kann.

Kritik im Schutz der Anonymität

Im Großbritannien der frühen 1660er Jahren unter der Regenschaft von König Charles II „wurde ein Drucker mit dem Namen John Twyn mit dem Tode bestraft, weil er den Namen eines anonymen Autors nicht nennen wollte, der kritisch über den König geschrieben hatte“, sagt Magnati. Zu allen Zeiten sei Anonymität genutzt worden, um repressive und autokratische Regierungen zu kritisieren.

„Wenn es um illegale Aktivitäten geht, werden Leute das Gesetz brechen – unabhängig davon, ob wir ihre Namen kennen. Für solche Fälle gibt es bereits Gesetze, wir brauchen nicht noch mehr“, sagt sie. Ihrer Meinung nach sollten die Gesetze nicht nur deshalb geändert werden, weil es eine neue und häufig missverstandene Technologie gibt.

Stört die eine Milliarde Facebook-Nutzer die fehlende Anonymität? Ganz und gar nicht. Die häufigste Beschwerde, die das Unternehmen derzeit bekommt, ist nicht, dass man keine anonyme Nutzung zulässt, sondern das genaue Gegenteil, sagt Allan. „Die Beschwerden, die wir bekommen, haben ganz häufig mit Nutzern zu tun, die falsche Identitäten auf Facebook nutzen. Ernsthafte Beschwerden von Nutzern,  die sich gerne als jemand anders präsentieren würden, gibt es nicht. Sie kommen von Aktivisten und Behörden, nicht von normalen Nutzern, deren Interesse das genaue Gegenteil ist.“

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Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Stocks Fall After Volatile Week

U.S. stocks declined on Friday afternoon at the end of one of the most volatile weeks in years for global markets. 91

Four Arrested in Hungary Over Migrant Truck Deaths

Flowers were placed where dozens of migrants were found dead.

Hungarian police said they had arrested four men after 71 migrants were found dead in a truck across the border in Austria on Thursday. 86

Hacker Killed by Drone Was Islamic State’s ‘Secret Weapon’

That Islamic State’s Junaid Hussain was targeted directly by the U.S. and U.K. shows the extent to which digital warfare has upset the balance of power on the modern battlefield. 203

Brazil’s Big Bet on China Turns Sour

Brazil’s big bet on China is turning sour as the Asian country’s once voracious appetite for Brazilian exports dims.

U.S. special-operations forces in Afghanistan are trying to make sure their elite Afghan counterparts can fight on their own before American troops leave, which is planned to take place by the end of next year. Photo: Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. special-operations forces in Afghanistan are trying to make sure their elite Afghan counterparts can fight on their own before American troops leave, which is planned to take place by the end of next year. Photo: Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images

Treading Line Between War and Peace, U.S. Special Forces Groom Afghan Troops

Special-operations units are trying to get their local counterparts ready for combat before American troops leave Afghanistan.

Fed Urged to Press Ahead With Rate Rise

After months of forewarning by the Fed that it is preparing to raise short-term interest rates, some international officials have a message: Get on with it already. 78

Big Oil Faces Prospect of Lower Refining Profits

For much of the past year, the world’s biggest energy companies suffered through an oil-price rout with one silver lining: Their little-loved refineries were churning out big profits again. Now, that bright spot could be fading, even as oil prices sink.

IMAGE 1 of 9

‘Craft’ Bourbon Is in the Eye of the Distiller

“Craft” distilleries have mushroomed in the U.S. to 588 from 51 over the past decade. Feeling the heat from the new competition, global liquor conglomerates are getting in on the act, and not letting definitions get in the way.

Syngenta Shareholders Not Happy

Some Syngenta AG shareholders are angry over the rejection of takeover proposals from rival Monsanto Co., which then walked away.

Hermès Plays Down China Luxury Risk

French luxury-goods company Hermès International said it expects demand for its pricey handbags and fashion to remain resilient and grow 8% this year despite the risk of an economic slowdown in China.

Luxury Brands Push Deeper Into India

As sales growth slows in China and other big markets, luxury-goods makers are seeking to cash in on patches of new wealth in often-unexpected parts of India, where there is a growing appetite for luxury brands.

‘Flash Crash’ Trader Denied Extradition Delay

British trader Navinder Sarao had requested a two-month delay in his extradition hearing.

Labor Group Says BofA CEO Moynihan Should Not be Chairman

A labor group is urging Bank of America shareholders to vote against a bylaw change that allows Brian Moynihan to hold the dual titles of bank CEO and chairman.

Oil Prices Resume Rally

Oil prices rose Friday, erasing earlier losses, as a surprise one-day rally extended to a second day.

How Do You Short China?

Traders are scouring stock, bond and currency markets for ways to make money on the malaise afflicting China. Some are piling into insurance-like contracts that would pay out if the country defaulted on a small pool of its foreign-denominated bonds.

Lebanon’s youth-led “You Stink” movement initially formed as a protest against mounds of uncollected garbage in Beirut. Now it wants political change.

Anger Over Garbage in Lebanon Blossoms into Demands for Reform

Calls for political reform, however, collide with country’s entrenched, sectarian-based political system.

China’s World

Markets? To Xi Jinping, Another Battle Comes First

Those who think a wilting economy and stock-market turmoil may divert Xi Jinping’s focus from his anticorruption campaign misunderstand his priorities, writes Andrew Browne.

Syriza’s Poll Lead Narrows Ahead of Election

Greece’s left-wing Syriza party is leading ahead of next month’s elections, a poll published Friday shows, though the gap with the conservative New Democracy party has closed considerably.

Ukraine’s U.S.-Born Finance Minister Praised for Persistence

Natalie Jaresko led months of tense negotiations with creditors, clocking thousands of air miles to reach a debt-relief deal that should help secure further bailout funds from the International Monetary Fund.

Russia

Moscow Strains To Upgrade Forces

Even as the country projects a muscular image, a falling ruble and weaker economy has forced President Vladimir Putin to scale back ambitious plans to modernize the military. 63

Mansion

A Swedish Couple’s Lakeside Oasis

Entrepreneur Olof Sköld and his partner, Helene Carson, build a retreat for their family

Technology

Pentagon Advances Partnership with Tech Firms for Flexible Electronics

The Pentagon is announcing that it will contribute seed money to a consortium of Silicon Valley firms to develop what defense officials say is a promising new technology incorporating “flexible” electronics.

China’s Moves Won’t Help U.S. Tech Firms

China’s moves to spur its slowing economy are having an important but less obvious effect on the tech sector: Strengthening local companies that were already making life difficult for U.S. rivals.

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09