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Global Markets Head Lower

Global stock markets headed lower at the end of a turbulent month that was dominated by concerns over China and the timing of the U.S. Federal Reserve’s future interest rate rise.

Meet the Private Watchdogs Policing Finance

The use of outside monitors to police financial institutions that have misbehaved has exploded in recent years, sometimes generating friction.

Fed Appears to Hold Line on Rate Plan

Federal Reserve officials emerged from a week of head-spinning financial turbulence largely sticking to their plan to raise U.S. interest rates before the end of the year.

EU Ministers Push for Action on Migrant Crisis

Germany, France and the U.K. pushed for a faster response in dealing with a migration crisis, as Hungarian police detained a fifth person in connection with the deaths of 71 migrants found in a truck in Austria.

Crises Put First Dents in Xi Jinping’s Power

Before a planned visit to the U.S., the Chinese president’s image as a bold leader is being undermined by his botched handling of the stock market rout and the country’s economic slowdown.

U.A.E. Takes Lead in Southern Yemen

U.A.E. forces prevented Houthi rebels in Yemen from overrunning the Yemeni port city of Aden and now also reluctantly find themselves in the business of nation-building.

Eni Reports Huge Natural-Gas Discovery off Egypt

Eni SpA said it made a massive natural-gas discovery off the coast of Egypt in what the Italian oil-and-gas company is calling the largest ever find in the Mediterranean Sea.

Apple’s Ad Blockers Rile Publishers

Apple’s move to make it easier to block ads on iPhones and iPads is troubling publishers and heightening tensions with its Silicon Valley neighbors like Google.

Personal Tech

Google OnHub Review: The Wi-Fi Router Gets a Brain

The search giant enters the home networking category, and makes your old router look stupid.

Iliad Lifted by New Mobile Clients

Iliad said net profit rose 16% in the first half as the French low-cost telecom company continued to win over new mobile clients with its ultracheap tariff plans.

Alibaba Targets Rural China for E-Commerce Growth

China e-commerce titans Alibaba and JD.com, facing a slowdown in the growth of their core urban customers, are battling to crack a new frontier: the sprawling countryside with some 600 million potential shoppers.

Hip-hop producer Irv “Gotti” Lorenzo, center, is seen in 2007. He calls himself a Signature Bank customer for life after the bank stood by him when he was facing money-laundering charges.

Hip-hop producer Irv “Gotti” Lorenzo, center, is seen in 2007. He calls himself a Signature Bank customer for life after the bank stood by him when he was facing money-laundering charges.

The Only Bank This Hip-Hop Mogul Will Use

Low-profile Signature Bank has become one of the nation’s fastest-growing lenders, attracting a fan base ranging from hip-hop mogul Irv “Gotti” Lorenzo to former Congressman Barney Frank

BNY Mellon’s Pricing Problems Persist

Executives at Bank of New York Mellon Corp. are racing against the clock to make it through a backlog of pricing issues before the markets open Monday morning.

Lawyer’s Offstage Acts Threaten Record Pact

When federal agents showed up at Keila Ravelo’s home three days before Christmas, they kicked off a chain of events that could send her to prison and scuttle the biggest antitrust settlement in U.S. history.

Ageas to Sell Hong Kong Life Insurance Business

Belgian insurance company Ageas said Sunday it will sell its Hong Kong Life insurance business to Chinese asset-management firm JD Capital for €1.23 billion.

Suppliers Feel Pain as Coal Miners Struggle

As big coal miners struggle, their equipment suppliers—thousands of businesses sprinkled throughout Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky—are scrambling to find new customers anywhere they can. 85

China Slowdown to Hit Asia Electronics Supply Chain

After several years of torrid expansion, the slowdown in smartphone sales in China is expected to hit Asian parts suppliers.

VW Is Told to Shed Suzuki Stake

An international court has ordered Volkswagen of Germany to sell its nearly 20% stake in Suzuki, allowing the Japanese auto maker to extricate itself from the tie-up after a four-year struggle.

Canadian Oil Sands Halts Crude Production at Syncrude

Canadian Oil Sands Ltd.has halted production at its Syncrude project in northern Alberta after a fire damaged equipment at its synthetic crude oil processing facility.

In Japan, Foreigners Fill Workforce Gaps

Non-Japanese are taking a bigger role in powering Japan’s economy, as a labor shortage impels the nation to overcome its longstanding resistance to foreign workers.

France to Finance Tax Cuts With Cost Savings

The French government says it can find $2.2 billion worth of savings in 2016 to pay for tax cuts for households without sacrificing France’s commitment to reduce the budget deficit.

Climate Change Builds as 2016 Issue

President Barack Obama’s trip to Alaska’s Arctic on Monday will likely reverberate much farther south, on the 2016 presidential campaign trail, where global warming is expected to emerge as a key issue. 259

Egypt Rejects Criticism of Journalists’ Jail Sentences

Egypt’s foreign ministry rejected international criticism of a court’s decision to sentence a team of Al Jazeera journalists to three years in prison, summoning the British ambassador to Egypt for condemning the verdict.

At Least 11 Die in Saudi Arabia Fire

A large fire at a residential compound of Saudi Arabia’s state-owned oil giant killed at least 11 people and injured more than 200, officials said. The cause of the fire was unknown.

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

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Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

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Urban Gardner

My Ping-Pong Paddling by Tennis Star Rafael Nadal

Columnist Ralph Gardner Jr. takes on tennis champion Rafael Nadal in ping pong. It was probably a good thing that they didn’t keep score.

Music

Foals’ ‘What Went Down’ Is a Visceral Confessional

Yannis Philippakis, the lead singer whose energetic stage presence and novelistic lyrics have made Foals one of British rock’s most compelling propositions, talks about the band’s fourth album.

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Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Facebook und die Schleswig-Holstein-Frage: Gibt es ein Recht auf Online-Anonymität?

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Zuletzt stand Schleswig-Holstein derart in den internationalen Schlagzeilen, als es im 19. Jahrhundert Zentrum des Kampfes zwischen Dänemark, Preußen und Österreich stand. Damals soll der britische Politiker Lord Palmerston gesagt haben, dass die Schleswig-Holstein-Frage so kompliziert sei, dass sie höchstens drei Männer in Europa jemals verstanden haben. „Einer davon war Prinz Albert, der tot ist. Der zweite war ein deutscher Professor, der verrückt wurde. Ich bin der dritte – und ich habe alles darüber vergessen“, scherzte der britische Lord seinerzeit.

Nun hat ein Mann das nördlichste Bundesland zurück in die Schlagzeilen gebracht: Thilo Weichert, der Landesdatenschutzbeauftragte von Schleswig-Holstein. Er hat eine Frage aufgeworfen, die so kompliziert ist, dass sie die ursprüngliche Schleswig-Holstein-Frage wie einen Kindergeburtstag aussehen lässt.

Im Dezember 2012 drohte Weichert Facebook erstmals mit einem Zwangsgeld, weil das Unternehmen die anonyme und pseudonyme Nutzung des sozialen Netzwerks nicht zulässt – was nach Auffassung Weicherts gegen deutsche Gesetze verstößt.  Inzwischen sind auch internationale Medien darauf aufmerksam geworden.

Facebook spricht von Steuergeldverschwendung

Facebook widerspricht Weichert. „Wir glauben, dass die Anweisungen sinnlos und eine Verschwendung von Steuergeldern sind, und wir werden uns ihnen energisch widersetzen“, heißt es vom Unternehmen. Doch in dieser Auseinandersetzung steckt mehr als die altbekannte Geschichte „Europäisches Land ist auf einen großen US-Konzern sauer“. Es geht hier um den Kern einer alten Internetdebatte: Haben wir das Recht auf Online-Anonymität?

Die Frage hat weitreichende Konsequenzen auch auf das normale Leben. Das irische Parlament untersucht die Rolle sozialer Internetmedien bei dem Selbstmord des irischen Politikers Shane McEntree. McEntree nahm sich nach einer Hetzkampagne das Leben, bei der auch sozialen Medien wie Facebook eine Rolle spielten.

Richard Allan, Directer of Policy von Facebook in Europa, verteidigt das Bestehen auf Klarnamen rigoros. Dem Unternehmen zufolge ist die Realname-Politik sowohl der Sicherheit als auch der zivilen Debattenkultur förderlich. „Wir tun das, weil es Grundlage dessen ist, was unsere Community definiert“, sagte er. „Sie soll dem echten Leben entsprechen. Dort würde man ja auch niemanden darüber belügen, wer man ist.“

Auch in der echten Welt gibt es Pseudonyme

dapd
Thilo Weichert.

Laut Simon Davies, ehemaliger Partner an der London School of Economics und Gründer der Organisation Privacy International, lässt Facebook bei seiner Darstellung von Interaktionen in der echten Welt aber einiges weg. „In der echten Welt gibt es unzählige Momente, in denen wir unseren Gegenüber nur per Pseudonym oder mit ihrer öffentlichen Identität kennen“, sagte er. „Wir entwickeln verschiedene Ebenen sozialer Interaktion. Wenn Facebook wirklich die volle Bandbreite der sozialen Interaktion ermöglichen will, die man beispielsweise in einer Kneipe findet, dann müssen sie Pseudonyme erlauben. Es gibt Leute, die nur mit ihrem Spitznamen bekannt sind. Wir können trotzdem ganz real mit diesen Leuten reden.“

Es komme darauf an, was wir wollen, sagt Davies. „Man muss unterscheiden, was Mechanismen für einen guten sozialen Austausch und was Mechanismen für ein sicheres soziales Netzwerk sind. Das ist nicht dasselbe.“

Brooke Magnanti schreibt heute für die Londoner Zeitung Daily Telegraph. Zuvor allerdings war sie Callgirl und schrieb einen Blog unter dem Pseudonym Belle de Jour über ihr Leben als Prostituierte. Sie sagt, dass der Verlust des Rechts auf Anonymität schwerer wiegen würde als jeder mögliche Schaden, der durch die missbräuchliche Nutzung von Anonymität entstehen kann.

Kritik im Schutz der Anonymität

Im Großbritannien der frühen 1660er Jahren unter der Regenschaft von König Charles II „wurde ein Drucker mit dem Namen John Twyn mit dem Tode bestraft, weil er den Namen eines anonymen Autors nicht nennen wollte, der kritisch über den König geschrieben hatte“, sagt Magnati. Zu allen Zeiten sei Anonymität genutzt worden, um repressive und autokratische Regierungen zu kritisieren.

„Wenn es um illegale Aktivitäten geht, werden Leute das Gesetz brechen – unabhängig davon, ob wir ihre Namen kennen. Für solche Fälle gibt es bereits Gesetze, wir brauchen nicht noch mehr“, sagt sie. Ihrer Meinung nach sollten die Gesetze nicht nur deshalb geändert werden, weil es eine neue und häufig missverstandene Technologie gibt.

Stört die eine Milliarde Facebook-Nutzer die fehlende Anonymität? Ganz und gar nicht. Die häufigste Beschwerde, die das Unternehmen derzeit bekommt, ist nicht, dass man keine anonyme Nutzung zulässt, sondern das genaue Gegenteil, sagt Allan. „Die Beschwerden, die wir bekommen, haben ganz häufig mit Nutzern zu tun, die falsche Identitäten auf Facebook nutzen. Ernsthafte Beschwerden von Nutzern,  die sich gerne als jemand anders präsentieren würden, gibt es nicht. Sie kommen von Aktivisten und Behörden, nicht von normalen Nutzern, deren Interesse das genaue Gegenteil ist.“

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Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Global Markets Head Lower

Global stock markets headed lower at the end of a turbulent month that was dominated by concerns over China and the timing of the U.S. Federal Reserve’s future interest rate rise.

Meet the Private Watchdogs Policing Finance

The use of outside monitors to police financial institutions that have misbehaved has exploded in recent years, sometimes generating friction.

Fed Appears to Hold Line on Rate Plan

Federal Reserve officials emerged from a week of head-spinning financial turbulence largely sticking to their plan to raise U.S. interest rates before the end of the year.

EU Ministers Push for Action on Migrant Crisis

Germany, France and the U.K. pushed for a faster response in dealing with a migration crisis, as Hungarian police detained a fifth person in connection with the deaths of 71 migrants found in a truck in Austria.

Crises Put First Dents in Xi Jinping’s Power

Before a planned visit to the U.S., the Chinese president’s image as a bold leader is being undermined by his botched handling of the stock market rout and the country’s economic slowdown.

U.A.E. Takes Lead in Southern Yemen

U.A.E. forces prevented Houthi rebels in Yemen from overrunning the Yemeni port city of Aden and now also reluctantly find themselves in the business of nation-building.

Eni Reports Huge Natural-Gas Discovery off Egypt

Eni SpA said it made a massive natural-gas discovery off the coast of Egypt in what the Italian oil-and-gas company is calling the largest ever find in the Mediterranean Sea.

Apple’s Ad Blockers Rile Publishers

Apple’s move to make it easier to block ads on iPhones and iPads is troubling publishers and heightening tensions with its Silicon Valley neighbors like Google.

Personal Tech

Google OnHub Review: The Wi-Fi Router Gets a Brain

The search giant enters the home networking category, and makes your old router look stupid.

Iliad Lifted by New Mobile Clients

Iliad said net profit rose 16% in the first half as the French low-cost telecom company continued to win over new mobile clients with its ultracheap tariff plans.

Alibaba Targets Rural China for E-Commerce Growth

China e-commerce titans Alibaba and JD.com, facing a slowdown in the growth of their core urban customers, are battling to crack a new frontier: the sprawling countryside with some 600 million potential shoppers.

Hip-hop producer Irv “Gotti” Lorenzo, center, is seen in 2007. He calls himself a Signature Bank customer for life after the bank stood by him when he was facing money-laundering charges.

Hip-hop producer Irv “Gotti” Lorenzo, center, is seen in 2007. He calls himself a Signature Bank customer for life after the bank stood by him when he was facing money-laundering charges.

The Only Bank This Hip-Hop Mogul Will Use

Low-profile Signature Bank has become one of the nation’s fastest-growing lenders, attracting a fan base ranging from hip-hop mogul Irv “Gotti” Lorenzo to former Congressman Barney Frank

BNY Mellon’s Pricing Problems Persist

Executives at Bank of New York Mellon Corp. are racing against the clock to make it through a backlog of pricing issues before the markets open Monday morning.

Lawyer’s Offstage Acts Threaten Record Pact

When federal agents showed up at Keila Ravelo’s home three days before Christmas, they kicked off a chain of events that could send her to prison and scuttle the biggest antitrust settlement in U.S. history.

Ageas to Sell Hong Kong Life Insurance Business

Belgian insurance company Ageas said Sunday it will sell its Hong Kong Life insurance business to Chinese asset-management firm JD Capital for €1.23 billion.

Suppliers Feel Pain as Coal Miners Struggle

As big coal miners struggle, their equipment suppliers—thousands of businesses sprinkled throughout Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky—are scrambling to find new customers anywhere they can. 85

China Slowdown to Hit Asia Electronics Supply Chain

After several years of torrid expansion, the slowdown in smartphone sales in China is expected to hit Asian parts suppliers.

VW Is Told to Shed Suzuki Stake

An international court has ordered Volkswagen of Germany to sell its nearly 20% stake in Suzuki, allowing the Japanese auto maker to extricate itself from the tie-up after a four-year struggle.

Canadian Oil Sands Halts Crude Production at Syncrude

Canadian Oil Sands Ltd.has halted production at its Syncrude project in northern Alberta after a fire damaged equipment at its synthetic crude oil processing facility.

In Japan, Foreigners Fill Workforce Gaps

Non-Japanese are taking a bigger role in powering Japan’s economy, as a labor shortage impels the nation to overcome its longstanding resistance to foreign workers.

France to Finance Tax Cuts With Cost Savings

The French government says it can find $2.2 billion worth of savings in 2016 to pay for tax cuts for households without sacrificing France’s commitment to reduce the budget deficit.

Climate Change Builds as 2016 Issue

President Barack Obama’s trip to Alaska’s Arctic on Monday will likely reverberate much farther south, on the 2016 presidential campaign trail, where global warming is expected to emerge as a key issue. 259

Egypt Rejects Criticism of Journalists’ Jail Sentences

Egypt’s foreign ministry rejected international criticism of a court’s decision to sentence a team of Al Jazeera journalists to three years in prison, summoning the British ambassador to Egypt for condemning the verdict.

At Least 11 Die in Saudi Arabia Fire

A large fire at a residential compound of Saudi Arabia’s state-owned oil giant killed at least 11 people and injured more than 200, officials said. The cause of the fire was unknown.

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09