The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Tribunal Finds Suzuki-VW Alliance Has Terminated

An arbitrator has ruled that an alliance between Suzuki Motor and VW has been terminated and ordered the German car maker to dispose of its 19.9% stake in Suzuki.

Four Men to Face Charges Over Migrant Deaths

A Hungarian court said four men could face up to 16 years in prison for alleged people trafficking in connection with the deaths of 71 migrants found in an abandoned truck.

Turkey Bombs Islamic State Targets in Syria as Part of U.S.-Led Coalition

Turkish jets bombed Islamic State targets in Syria under the umbrella of the U.S.-led international coalition for the first time, the country’s government said, as Turkey expands its fight against the extremist group.

Thousands March Against Lebanon Government

A demonstration in Beirut against poor waste management blossomed into full-throated demands that Lebanon’s long-standing political class step down from power.

Volunteer Melinda McRostie speaks to migrants who just arrived on the Greek island of Lesbos.

Volunteer Melinda McRostie speaks to migrants who just arrived on the Greek island of Lesbos.

Financially Strapped Greece Struggles With a Flood of Refugees

On the island of Lesbos, volunteers shore up efforts to house and feed tens of thousands of migrants.

Stock Swings Don’t Shake Investors

Stock indexes’ wildest week in years rattled investors and fueled expectations for further price swings, but it failed to squelch the belief U.S. markets remain the best place to put money. 58

Fed’s Fischer: ‘Good Reason’ to Think U.S. Inflation Will Move Higher

The Fed‘s Stanley Fischer said there is “good reason” to think sluggish U.S. inflation will firm and move back toward the U.S. central bank’s 2% annual target, touching on a significant assessment facing the Fed ahead of its September policy meeting. 69

Egyptian Court Sentences Al Jazeera Journalists

An Egyptian judge sentenced a trio of Al Jazeera English journalists to three years in prison, prompting fresh criticism of the government’s clampdown on press and political freedoms.

France, Germany Warn Putin on Ukraine Separatist Elections

Leaders of France and Germany told Russian President Vladimir Putin that rebel-run elections conducted in the separatist-controlled regions of Ukraine would endanger the so-called Minsk peace process. 52

Rice to Press Pakistan on Antiterror Vigilance

National security adviser Susan Rice is set to arrive in Pakistan on Sunday to press the country’s government to do more to prevent terrorists from using its territory as a base for attacks on neighboring states.

Treading Line Between War and Peace, U.S. Special Forces Groom Afghan Troops

The U.S. military allowed The Wall Street Journal to visit a variety of commando units, offering a glimpse into what may be the last fighting season of America’s longest war. 70

Foreign Man Arrested in Bangkok Blast Probe

Thai police said they arrested a foreign man whom they described as a suspect in this month’s deadly bombing of a Bangkok shrine that is popular with Chinese tourists.

Buying the Dips Doesn’t Work for Everyone

The old strategy of buying the dips may not work for everyone. In fact, for some people, it could be disastrous, writes Jason Zweig.

How Do You Short China?

Traders are scouring stock, bond and currency markets for ways to make money on the malaise afflicting China. Some are piling into insurance-like contracts that would pay out if the country defaulted on a small pool of its foreign-denominated bonds.

Myanmar Buzz Fades for Many U.S. Investors

Disenchantment with the business climate, especially among American companies, comes as concerns are spreading about Myanmar’s political future.

A ‘Black Swan’ Fund Made $1 Billion This Week

Universa Hedge Fund, a well-known ‘black swan’ fund, made more than $1 billion in profits in one week amid volatility. 53

Inmarsat Says Russian Proton Rocket Puts Satellite Into Orbit

Inmarsat declared the launch of a Russian Proton rocket carrying one of its satellites a success after the rocket delivered its cargo into its initial orbit position.

China’s Moves Won’t Help U.S. Tech Firms

China’s moves to spur its slowing economy are having an important but less obvious effect on the tech sector: Strengthening local companies that already were making life difficult for U.S. rivals.

European Refiners’ Profit Revival Faces End

Europe’s biggest energy companies have enjoyed a revival of refinery profits, but that run may be winding down even as oil prices slump.

Rebekah Brooks to Return to News Corp

Rebekah Brooks is expected to head News Corp’s U.K. division, a position similar to one she resigned from amid the phone-hacking scandal. Separately, Britain’s Crown Prosecution Service is reviewing a police referral related to the hacking probe.

U.S.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R., Tenn.), right, listens to Sen. John Barrasso (R., Wyo.) last month in Washington, D.C.

Foes Try New Ways To Attack Iran Deal

Congressional opponents of the Iranian nuclear accord are devising a Plan B as President Obama moves closer to locking up the support needed to implement the deal. 677

Book Reviews

Stieg Larsson’s Heroine Lives Again

David Lagercrantz’s “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” revives Lisbeth Salander in fitting style.

World War II’s Greatest Escape

Allied prisoners broke out of a German camp using ladders inspired by medieval siege tools.

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09

On Wine: Will Lyons

Why Gin Is Back With a Flourish

Gin is experiencing the kind of boom the wine industry experienced in the mid-1980s, as boutique-distilled bottles with names like Half Hitch, Opihr and Ransom Old Tom give the classic G&T a new—and flavorful—twist

Music

Foals’ ‘What Went Down’ Is a Visceral Confessional

Yannis Philippakis, the lead singer whose energetic stage presence and novelistic lyrics have made Foals one of British rock’s most compelling propositions, talks about the band’s fourth album.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

„Start-ups sind Baby-Firmen, die Baby-Gesetze brauchen“

Der Unternehmer Martin Varsavsky hat mehrere Telekommunikationsunternehmen in den USA und Europa gegründet – darunter FON, das weltweit möglichst flächendeckend WLAN-Hotspots aufbauen will. Der Kosmopolit kennt sich in Spanien genauso gut aus wie in den USA. Dieses Jahr verbringt er in New York und unterrichtet Entrepreneurship an der Columbia University. Mit dem Wall Street Journal Deutschland sprach Varsavksy am Rande der DLD-Konferenz in München über die Unterschiede zwischen Europa und den USA, vorsichtige Deutsche und seine Forderung nach Baby-Gesetzen für Start-ups in Deutschland.

WSJ Tech: Sie kennen New York, Miami und Madrid. Wenn Sie heute ein neues Unternehmen gründen würden – wo wäre das?

Martin Varsavsky: Das kommt auf die Art des Unternehmens an. Ich habe viel Zeit mit Nachforschungen verbracht, um zu entscheiden, wo ich die weiteren FON-Büros für die USA eröffnen könnte, um zu wachsen. Ich habe mir dazu Brooklyn in New York, die Bay Area und Miami angesehen. Meine Entscheidung fiel auf Miami, was vollkommen ungewöhnlich ist – es gibt dort kein einziges Tech-Unternehmen. Aber ich bin 1995 schon nach Madrid gezogen, wo es ebenfalls kein einziges Technologie-Unternehmen gab – mit gutem Ergebnis. Damals haben die Leute gesagt, dass ich verrückt bin, als ich Madrid als Standort wählte.

Warum haben Sie sich dennoch für Madrid und Miami entschieden?

Im Grunde geht es um Wahrscheinlichkeiten. Sagen wir, es gibt sechs Millionen Leute an einem Ort wie Miami. Wenn die Bevölkerung zufällig verteilt ist, wird ein Teil davon Programmierer werden wollen, findet aber keinen Job. Im Falle von Miami gehen diese Leute dann ins Silicon Valley, nach San Francisco, Boston oder New York. In Spanien ist das ähnlich: Diese Leute gehen nach Deutschland, Frankreich, Großbritannien. Wenn Sie aber vor Ort ein Tech-Unternehmen starten und wettbewerbsfähige Gehälter anbieten, finden Sie schnell heraus, dass es dort geeignete Leute gibt, die bislang einfach keinen geeigneten Job gefunden haben. Wenn ich in Europa gründen würde, dann fiele meine Wahl auf Spanien, weil es dort nur sehr wenige Tech-Unternehmen gibt und eine unglaubliche Arbeitslosigkeit. Das bietet riesengroße Möglichkeiten, Leute zu beschäftigen. Und wenn ich in den USA gründen würde, dann in Miami.

In Spanien sind vor allem Jugendliche zu großen Teilen arbeitslos, viele davon gut ausgebildet. Warum konkurrieren nicht mehr Unternehmen um dieses Potenzial?

Ja, fast 50 Prozent der unter 30-Jährigen sind arbeitslos. Wir stellen sehr viele Leute unter 30 ein. Aber Spanien leidet unter einem Mangel an Unternehmertum. Leider wachsen die meisten Leute in Spanien mit der Vorstellung auf, Angestellte werden zu wollen – am besten bei der Regierung. Sie wollen Sicherheit, sie haben Angst vor Unsicherheit. Das gilt für ganz Europa aber für Spanien gilt das ganz besonders. Das ist aber auch der Grund, warum manche Unternehmen dorthin gehen. Ich bin von den USA nach Spanien gezogen und war erfolgreich. Der drittreichste Mann der Welt, Amancio Ortega, baute seine Firma in La Coruña auf – sein Unternehmen ist 55 Milliarden US-Dollar wert, er ist reicher als Waren Buffett. Er hat die wertvollste europäische Firma der letzten 40 Jahr gegründet. Es ist ein bisschen wie mit den Pythons, die nach Florida eingeschleppt und dort ohne natürliche Feinde zur Plage wurden. Wenn Sie als guter Unternehmer nach Spanien gehen, sind Sie die Python. Sie fragen sich, wo alle anderen sind. Das Problem ist, dass es nicht genug davon gibt.

Es ist also eine Frage der Kultur?

Wenn Sie mich dazu zwingen, eine historische Erklärung zu nennen: Spanien hat einen großer Fehler begangen, als es 1492 alle Juden verbannte. Sehen Sie sich Spanien vor 1492 an, wie erfolgreich es zum Beispiel damit war, Amerika zu erobern. Ich bin jüdisch und habe daher keine objektive Sicht auf das Thema. Aber ich glaube, dass es keine tolle Idee war, alle Juden loszuwerden. Erst haben die Spanier ihr Unternehmertun quasi an die Juden outgesourct und sind sie dann losgeworden. Plötzlich war nicht mehr viel Unternehmertum übrig.

Sie haben Unternehmen sowohl in den USA als auch in Europa gegründet – was glauben Sie, sind die Hauptunterschiede für Unternehmer?

Ich habe dazu einen sehr langen Artikel in meinem Blog geschrieben: „Advice for US Entrepreneurs who move to Europe“. Um die Hauptunterschiede zusammenzufassen: Das Rechtssystem ist in Europa deutlich besser als in den USA. Europa ist in dieser Hinsicht viel wettbewerbsfähiger, weil Anwälte hier deutlich weniger wichtig sind und es weniger juristische Streitigkeiten gibt. Europa hat bessere Gesundheitssysteme, weil die Gesundheitskosten nicht dartig steigen. In den USA sind sowohl die Kosten für Rechtsstreitigkeiten als auch für die Gesundheitsversorgung einfach nur verrückt. Europa ist außerdem besser darin, den Durchschnittsbürger zu bilden, während Amerika die Elite besser ausbildet. Europa glänzt in der Mitte, die USA sind in den Extremen stark – positiv wie negativ. Sie haben sowohl die am wenigstens gebildeten Leute als auch die gebildetsten – und Europa hat die Mitte.

Und was sind die Nachteile in Europa?

Negativ in Europa ist der Mangel eines gemeinsamen Marktes. Es gibt zwar die Europäische Union, und es gibt einen freien Warenaustausch – aber noch immer bestehen viele Hindernisse bei einheitlicher Werbung, Sprache, Kultur. In den USA ist es außerdem sehr viel einfacher, an Kapital zu kommen, es gibt mehr Wagniskapital und es ist in Amerika deutlich akzeptierter, zu scheitern. Privatinsolvenzen gibt es zwar auch in Europa, sie sind aber kein so einfaches Verfahren wie in den USA. Außerdem gibt es in Europa viele Gesetze, die Arbeitnehmer schützen sollen, aber Start-ups behindern.

Was sollte Deutschland Ihrer Meinung nach tun, um die Start-up-Kultur zu fördern?

Deutschland sollte ein eigenes Regelwerk für Unternehmen aufstellen, die drei Bedingungen erfüllen: Firmen, die jünger als drei Jahre sind, weniger als 20 Angestellte haben und Verluste machen. Meiner Meinung nach sollte die gesamte Sozialgesetzgebung bei diesen Unternehmen nicht greifen. Sobald sie dann entweder anfangen Geld zu verdienen oder mehr als 20 Angestellte haben oder älter als drei Jahre sind, sollten alle Gesetze angewendet werden. Damit würden Sie den Unternehmen in einer sehr kritischen Phase eine Chance geben. In ganz Europa gelten dieselben Gesetze für Siemens und den kleinen Unternehmer, der gerade anfängt. Diese gesamte Sozialgesetzgebung – zum Beispiel in Bezug auf Schwangerschaften – funktioniert, wenn Sie 100 Angestellte haben. Aber stellen Sie sich vor, Sie haben zwei Angestellte – und eine davon wird schwanger. Das ist wie ein umgekehrter Lottogewinn. Die Gesetze funktionieren nicht für Start-ups. Start-ups sind Babys. Und Baby-Unternehmen sollten wie Babys behandelt werden. Sobald sie groß genug sind, um erwachsen zu sein, sollten sie wie Erwachsene behandelt werden.

Spaniens stark regulierter Arbeitsmarkt ist besonders in der Kritik…

Ich habe Unternehmen gegründet, die von einer Ein-Mann-Firma zu Unternehmen mit über 1000 Angestellten gewachsen sind. Ich persönlich habe heute als Unternehmer an Europas Arbeitsgesetzen nicht viel auszusetzen. Wenn Sie über 1000 Leute beschäftigen, sind die Arbeitsgesetze für Spanien überwiegend in Ordnung. Ein Problem haben Sie, wenn sie zehn haben. Ich habe nichts grundsätzlich gegen Arbeitnehmerrechte – sie sind gut, sie schützen die Leute. Ich habe überhaupt nichts dagegen, wenn in Unternehmen mit 1000 Angestellten starke Arbeitnehmerrechte gelten.

Kommen wir zum anderen Hauptnachteil Kontinentaleuropas aus Ihrer Sicht: Warum ist Wagniskapital in Deutschland so viel schwerer zu bekommen als in den USA und Großbritannien?

Die Deutschen sind einfach sehr risikoavers.

Sie meinen, die Deutschen sind Feiglinge?

Ich bin mit einer Deutschen verheiratet – zitieren Sie mich auf keinen Fall so! „Risikoavers“ ist mein Wort. Wenn mein Schwiegervater liest, dass ich behaupte, die Deutschen seien Feiglinge, ist er richtig sauer. Was ich sagen will: Die Deutschen bevorzugen geringe Gewinne, die mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit eintreten gegenüber hohen Gewinnen, die weniger wahrscheinlich eintreten. Die Angelsachsen sind risikobereiter und bevorzugen das „Alles-oder-nichts“-Prinzip. In einem Casino würden Deutsche auf rot oder schwarz setzen, die Angelsachsen auf eine Zahl – also im Schnitt.

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Kommentare (3 aus 3)

Alle Kommentare »
    • Great ideas, great Interview, Great article. Thanks all.

    • Thanks you Stephan and Martin for this very cute article. I like the idea of "Baby-laws" for startups.
      Since years we are reading only bad news from Madrid/Spain. Cool, here is a guy who wants "Go do Madrid and let´s rock your Startup".

    • [...] Start-ups „Start-ups sind Baby-Firmen, die Baby-Gesetze brauchen“ Der Unternehmer Martin Varsavsky hat mehrere Telekommunikationsunternehmen in den USA und Europa gegründet – darunter FON, das weltweit möglichst flächendeckend WLAN-Hotspots aufbauen will. Der Kosmopolit kennt sich in Spanien genauso gut aus wie in den USA. Dieses Jahr verbringt er in New York und unterrichtet Entrepreneurship an der Columbia University. Mit dem Wall Street Journal Deutschland sprach Varsavksy am Rande der DLD-Konferenz in München über die Unterschiede zwischen Europa und den USA, vorsichtige Deutsche und seine Forderung nach Baby-Gesetzen für Start-ups in Deutschland. WSJ [...]

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Tribunal Finds Suzuki-VW Alliance Has Terminated

An arbitrator has ruled that an alliance between Suzuki Motor and VW has been terminated and ordered the German car maker to dispose of its 19.9% stake in Suzuki.

Four Men to Face Charges Over Migrant Deaths

A Hungarian court said four men could face up to 16 years in prison for alleged people trafficking in connection with the deaths of 71 migrants found in an abandoned truck.

Turkey Bombs Islamic State Targets in Syria as Part of U.S.-Led Coalition

Turkish jets bombed Islamic State targets in Syria under the umbrella of the U.S.-led international coalition for the first time, the country’s government said, as Turkey expands its fight against the extremist group.

Thousands March Against Lebanon Government

A demonstration in Beirut against poor waste management blossomed into full-throated demands that Lebanon’s long-standing political class step down from power.

Volunteer Melinda McRostie speaks to migrants who just arrived on the Greek island of Lesbos.

Volunteer Melinda McRostie speaks to migrants who just arrived on the Greek island of Lesbos.

Financially Strapped Greece Struggles With a Flood of Refugees

On the island of Lesbos, volunteers shore up efforts to house and feed tens of thousands of migrants.

Stock Swings Don’t Shake Investors

Stock indexes’ wildest week in years rattled investors and fueled expectations for further price swings, but it failed to squelch the belief U.S. markets remain the best place to put money. 58

Fed’s Fischer: ‘Good Reason’ to Think U.S. Inflation Will Move Higher

The Fed‘s Stanley Fischer said there is “good reason” to think sluggish U.S. inflation will firm and move back toward the U.S. central bank’s 2% annual target, touching on a significant assessment facing the Fed ahead of its September policy meeting. 69

Egyptian Court Sentences Al Jazeera Journalists

An Egyptian judge sentenced a trio of Al Jazeera English journalists to three years in prison, prompting fresh criticism of the government’s clampdown on press and political freedoms.

France, Germany Warn Putin on Ukraine Separatist Elections

Leaders of France and Germany told Russian President Vladimir Putin that rebel-run elections conducted in the separatist-controlled regions of Ukraine would endanger the so-called Minsk peace process. 52

Rice to Press Pakistan on Antiterror Vigilance

National security adviser Susan Rice is set to arrive in Pakistan on Sunday to press the country’s government to do more to prevent terrorists from using its territory as a base for attacks on neighboring states.

Treading Line Between War and Peace, U.S. Special Forces Groom Afghan Troops

The U.S. military allowed The Wall Street Journal to visit a variety of commando units, offering a glimpse into what may be the last fighting season of America’s longest war. 70

Foreign Man Arrested in Bangkok Blast Probe

Thai police said they arrested a foreign man whom they described as a suspect in this month’s deadly bombing of a Bangkok shrine that is popular with Chinese tourists.

Buying the Dips Doesn’t Work for Everyone

The old strategy of buying the dips may not work for everyone. In fact, for some people, it could be disastrous, writes Jason Zweig.

How Do You Short China?

Traders are scouring stock, bond and currency markets for ways to make money on the malaise afflicting China. Some are piling into insurance-like contracts that would pay out if the country defaulted on a small pool of its foreign-denominated bonds.

Myanmar Buzz Fades for Many U.S. Investors

Disenchantment with the business climate, especially among American companies, comes as concerns are spreading about Myanmar’s political future.

A ‘Black Swan’ Fund Made $1 Billion This Week

Universa Hedge Fund, a well-known ‘black swan’ fund, made more than $1 billion in profits in one week amid volatility. 53

Inmarsat Says Russian Proton Rocket Puts Satellite Into Orbit

Inmarsat declared the launch of a Russian Proton rocket carrying one of its satellites a success after the rocket delivered its cargo into its initial orbit position.

China’s Moves Won’t Help U.S. Tech Firms

China’s moves to spur its slowing economy are having an important but less obvious effect on the tech sector: Strengthening local companies that already were making life difficult for U.S. rivals.

European Refiners’ Profit Revival Faces End

Europe’s biggest energy companies have enjoyed a revival of refinery profits, but that run may be winding down even as oil prices slump.

Rebekah Brooks to Return to News Corp

Rebekah Brooks is expected to head News Corp’s U.K. division, a position similar to one she resigned from amid the phone-hacking scandal. Separately, Britain’s Crown Prosecution Service is reviewing a police referral related to the hacking probe.

U.S.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R., Tenn.), right, listens to Sen. John Barrasso (R., Wyo.) last month in Washington, D.C.

Foes Try New Ways To Attack Iran Deal

Congressional opponents of the Iranian nuclear accord are devising a Plan B as President Obama moves closer to locking up the support needed to implement the deal. 677

Book Reviews

Stieg Larsson’s Heroine Lives Again

David Lagercrantz’s “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” revives Lisbeth Salander in fitting style.

World War II’s Greatest Escape

Allied prisoners broke out of a German camp using ladders inspired by medieval siege tools.

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09