The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Migrant Crackdown Sows Chaos in Europe

German Chancellor Angela Merkel called on Europe to tackle the migrant crisis and agree on a fair distribution of people, warning that failing to do so might put the EU’s open-border policy at risk. 50

Russia Puts Off Data Showdown With Technology Firms

Facebook, Google and Twitter are among the U.S. companies that are getting more time to comply with a new law requiring Russian data centers.

Large Blast Reported in Chinese City

An explosion ripped through an industrial zone in northeastern China just two weeks after a chemical blast killed more than 150 people and raised concerns about industrial safety in China.

Oil Surges as Supply Estimates Shrink

Oil prices soared Monday, marking their strongest three-day rally since Iraq’s 1990 invasion of Kuwait, on doubts the global glut of crude would be as long-lasting as many investors and traders had earlier believed. 59

Ukrainian National Guard Officer Killed, Dozens Injured in Protest Blast

One member of Ukraine’s National Guard was killed and at least 69 others were injured outside the country’s parliament, as fighting broke out between protesters and law-enforcement officers.

Inside Kellogg’s Effort to Cash In on the Health-Food Craze

Fixing its Kashi brand, says the CEO, is key to bulking up sales in the fast-growing natural and organic food aisles.

Service Providers See Gold in Shares of Startups

Branding firm Red Antler is among vendors that are looking to profit on the soaring valuations of young startups by taking payment in stock instead of cash.

Samsung Takes Smartwatch Fight to Apple

Samsung plans to unveil a new smartwatch, as the company attempts to prove that it can outshine Apple on design in a nascent product category.

Apple and Cisco Unveil a Business Partnership

Apple and Cisco Systems are teaming up to help bring more iPhones and iPads to business users.

Patent-Law Change Would Raise Medical Costs

A patent law change pushed by the pharmaceutical industry could cost federal health-care programs $1.3 billion over a decade by delaying new generic drugs, the Congressional Budget Office estimates.

Google, Sanofi Team Up on Diabetes Research

The Internet company said its health-care research unit plans to work with European pharmaceutical major Sanofi on new ways to monitor and treat the condition.

Tokyo Court: Nomura Wrongfully Dismissed U.S. Executive

Japan’s largest brokerage wrongfully dismissed an American managing director during a dispute over compensation for a product he invented, the Tokyo District Court ruled.

China Data Pulls Down Asian Shares

Asian markets fell Tuesday, pressured by disappointing manufacturing data that added to concerns about the health of China’s economy.

David Einhorn’s Greenlight Takes a Beating in August

The firm told investors it lost 5.3% in August as the value of its major holdings declined, said people familiar with the matter, widening its loss for the year to 13.8%.

BNY Catches Up With Pricing Backlog

Bank of New York Mellon said it had updated pricing data for mutual and exchange-traded fund-pricing issues before the market opened Monday, ending a weeklong struggle by the company to provide accurate asset values.

Sports

At the U.S. Open, Djokovic Struggles to Close

Novak Djokovic—the best and most consistent tennis player in the world for five years now—has only won U.S. Open one time in his career.

World

Islamic State Blows Up Palmyra Ruins

Islamic State has partially destroyed Palmyra’s 2,000-year-old Temple of Bel in a massive explosion, the latest in a series of attacks by the militants on the Syrian city’s famed historic sites. 171

Turkey Arrests Vice News Journalists

A Turkish court ordered the formal arrest of three Vice News journalists on terrorism-related charges, days after detaining the foreign nationals as they covered a mounting Kurdish insurgency in the country.

Blue Bell Ice Cream Returns to Store Shelves

Cartons of Blue Bell ice cream began reappearing in grocery stores in cities Monday, a major step after the ice-cream maker yanked all its products following a deadly listeria outbreak and faced a financial crisis.

Crackdown on Racial Bias Boosts Some Auto-Loan Costs

A federal regulator’s campaign to fight bias against minorities is changing the way many car loans are priced, a move that is increasing costs for some consumers. 153

StubHub Gets Out of ‘All-In’ Pricing

Nearly two years after shifting to “all-in” pricing, ticket-resale giant StubHub is reversing course and returning to its old system of adding 15% to 17% at the last minute.

U.K. Approves Giant North Sea Gas Project

A.P. Møller-Maersk A/S said it has received approval to develop the $4.5 billion Culzean gas field, the largest new find in the U.K. North Sea for a decade.

Iran Deal Could Open Door to Gulf Businesses

While executives in the Gulf see opportunities, the region’s governments remain at loggerheads on other issues.

Video

Ukraine Protest Blast Kills Officer, Injures Dozens

0:45

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

What to Watch for After Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is afflicting more people, and research shows patients who have had non-melanoma skin cancers are at increased risk of recurrence.

IMAGE 1 of 12

Video Music Awards 2015

Kanye West gave a long rant at the MTV Video Music Awards as he apologized to Taylor Swift for taking her microphone in 2009. Swift presented West with the Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award. Earlier, she and Nicki Minaj buried their beef by joining forces onstage.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

„Start-ups sind Baby-Firmen, die Baby-Gesetze brauchen“

Der Unternehmer Martin Varsavsky hat mehrere Telekommunikationsunternehmen in den USA und Europa gegründet – darunter FON, das weltweit möglichst flächendeckend WLAN-Hotspots aufbauen will. Der Kosmopolit kennt sich in Spanien genauso gut aus wie in den USA. Dieses Jahr verbringt er in New York und unterrichtet Entrepreneurship an der Columbia University. Mit dem Wall Street Journal Deutschland sprach Varsavksy am Rande der DLD-Konferenz in München über die Unterschiede zwischen Europa und den USA, vorsichtige Deutsche und seine Forderung nach Baby-Gesetzen für Start-ups in Deutschland.

WSJ Tech: Sie kennen New York, Miami und Madrid. Wenn Sie heute ein neues Unternehmen gründen würden – wo wäre das?

Martin Varsavsky: Das kommt auf die Art des Unternehmens an. Ich habe viel Zeit mit Nachforschungen verbracht, um zu entscheiden, wo ich die weiteren FON-Büros für die USA eröffnen könnte, um zu wachsen. Ich habe mir dazu Brooklyn in New York, die Bay Area und Miami angesehen. Meine Entscheidung fiel auf Miami, was vollkommen ungewöhnlich ist – es gibt dort kein einziges Tech-Unternehmen. Aber ich bin 1995 schon nach Madrid gezogen, wo es ebenfalls kein einziges Technologie-Unternehmen gab – mit gutem Ergebnis. Damals haben die Leute gesagt, dass ich verrückt bin, als ich Madrid als Standort wählte.

Warum haben Sie sich dennoch für Madrid und Miami entschieden?

Im Grunde geht es um Wahrscheinlichkeiten. Sagen wir, es gibt sechs Millionen Leute an einem Ort wie Miami. Wenn die Bevölkerung zufällig verteilt ist, wird ein Teil davon Programmierer werden wollen, findet aber keinen Job. Im Falle von Miami gehen diese Leute dann ins Silicon Valley, nach San Francisco, Boston oder New York. In Spanien ist das ähnlich: Diese Leute gehen nach Deutschland, Frankreich, Großbritannien. Wenn Sie aber vor Ort ein Tech-Unternehmen starten und wettbewerbsfähige Gehälter anbieten, finden Sie schnell heraus, dass es dort geeignete Leute gibt, die bislang einfach keinen geeigneten Job gefunden haben. Wenn ich in Europa gründen würde, dann fiele meine Wahl auf Spanien, weil es dort nur sehr wenige Tech-Unternehmen gibt und eine unglaubliche Arbeitslosigkeit. Das bietet riesengroße Möglichkeiten, Leute zu beschäftigen. Und wenn ich in den USA gründen würde, dann in Miami.

In Spanien sind vor allem Jugendliche zu großen Teilen arbeitslos, viele davon gut ausgebildet. Warum konkurrieren nicht mehr Unternehmen um dieses Potenzial?

Ja, fast 50 Prozent der unter 30-Jährigen sind arbeitslos. Wir stellen sehr viele Leute unter 30 ein. Aber Spanien leidet unter einem Mangel an Unternehmertum. Leider wachsen die meisten Leute in Spanien mit der Vorstellung auf, Angestellte werden zu wollen – am besten bei der Regierung. Sie wollen Sicherheit, sie haben Angst vor Unsicherheit. Das gilt für ganz Europa aber für Spanien gilt das ganz besonders. Das ist aber auch der Grund, warum manche Unternehmen dorthin gehen. Ich bin von den USA nach Spanien gezogen und war erfolgreich. Der drittreichste Mann der Welt, Amancio Ortega, baute seine Firma in La Coruña auf – sein Unternehmen ist 55 Milliarden US-Dollar wert, er ist reicher als Waren Buffett. Er hat die wertvollste europäische Firma der letzten 40 Jahr gegründet. Es ist ein bisschen wie mit den Pythons, die nach Florida eingeschleppt und dort ohne natürliche Feinde zur Plage wurden. Wenn Sie als guter Unternehmer nach Spanien gehen, sind Sie die Python. Sie fragen sich, wo alle anderen sind. Das Problem ist, dass es nicht genug davon gibt.

Es ist also eine Frage der Kultur?

Wenn Sie mich dazu zwingen, eine historische Erklärung zu nennen: Spanien hat einen großer Fehler begangen, als es 1492 alle Juden verbannte. Sehen Sie sich Spanien vor 1492 an, wie erfolgreich es zum Beispiel damit war, Amerika zu erobern. Ich bin jüdisch und habe daher keine objektive Sicht auf das Thema. Aber ich glaube, dass es keine tolle Idee war, alle Juden loszuwerden. Erst haben die Spanier ihr Unternehmertun quasi an die Juden outgesourct und sind sie dann losgeworden. Plötzlich war nicht mehr viel Unternehmertum übrig.

Sie haben Unternehmen sowohl in den USA als auch in Europa gegründet – was glauben Sie, sind die Hauptunterschiede für Unternehmer?

Ich habe dazu einen sehr langen Artikel in meinem Blog geschrieben: „Advice for US Entrepreneurs who move to Europe“. Um die Hauptunterschiede zusammenzufassen: Das Rechtssystem ist in Europa deutlich besser als in den USA. Europa ist in dieser Hinsicht viel wettbewerbsfähiger, weil Anwälte hier deutlich weniger wichtig sind und es weniger juristische Streitigkeiten gibt. Europa hat bessere Gesundheitssysteme, weil die Gesundheitskosten nicht dartig steigen. In den USA sind sowohl die Kosten für Rechtsstreitigkeiten als auch für die Gesundheitsversorgung einfach nur verrückt. Europa ist außerdem besser darin, den Durchschnittsbürger zu bilden, während Amerika die Elite besser ausbildet. Europa glänzt in der Mitte, die USA sind in den Extremen stark – positiv wie negativ. Sie haben sowohl die am wenigstens gebildeten Leute als auch die gebildetsten – und Europa hat die Mitte.

Und was sind die Nachteile in Europa?

Negativ in Europa ist der Mangel eines gemeinsamen Marktes. Es gibt zwar die Europäische Union, und es gibt einen freien Warenaustausch – aber noch immer bestehen viele Hindernisse bei einheitlicher Werbung, Sprache, Kultur. In den USA ist es außerdem sehr viel einfacher, an Kapital zu kommen, es gibt mehr Wagniskapital und es ist in Amerika deutlich akzeptierter, zu scheitern. Privatinsolvenzen gibt es zwar auch in Europa, sie sind aber kein so einfaches Verfahren wie in den USA. Außerdem gibt es in Europa viele Gesetze, die Arbeitnehmer schützen sollen, aber Start-ups behindern.

Was sollte Deutschland Ihrer Meinung nach tun, um die Start-up-Kultur zu fördern?

Deutschland sollte ein eigenes Regelwerk für Unternehmen aufstellen, die drei Bedingungen erfüllen: Firmen, die jünger als drei Jahre sind, weniger als 20 Angestellte haben und Verluste machen. Meiner Meinung nach sollte die gesamte Sozialgesetzgebung bei diesen Unternehmen nicht greifen. Sobald sie dann entweder anfangen Geld zu verdienen oder mehr als 20 Angestellte haben oder älter als drei Jahre sind, sollten alle Gesetze angewendet werden. Damit würden Sie den Unternehmen in einer sehr kritischen Phase eine Chance geben. In ganz Europa gelten dieselben Gesetze für Siemens und den kleinen Unternehmer, der gerade anfängt. Diese gesamte Sozialgesetzgebung – zum Beispiel in Bezug auf Schwangerschaften – funktioniert, wenn Sie 100 Angestellte haben. Aber stellen Sie sich vor, Sie haben zwei Angestellte – und eine davon wird schwanger. Das ist wie ein umgekehrter Lottogewinn. Die Gesetze funktionieren nicht für Start-ups. Start-ups sind Babys. Und Baby-Unternehmen sollten wie Babys behandelt werden. Sobald sie groß genug sind, um erwachsen zu sein, sollten sie wie Erwachsene behandelt werden.

Spaniens stark regulierter Arbeitsmarkt ist besonders in der Kritik…

Ich habe Unternehmen gegründet, die von einer Ein-Mann-Firma zu Unternehmen mit über 1000 Angestellten gewachsen sind. Ich persönlich habe heute als Unternehmer an Europas Arbeitsgesetzen nicht viel auszusetzen. Wenn Sie über 1000 Leute beschäftigen, sind die Arbeitsgesetze für Spanien überwiegend in Ordnung. Ein Problem haben Sie, wenn sie zehn haben. Ich habe nichts grundsätzlich gegen Arbeitnehmerrechte – sie sind gut, sie schützen die Leute. Ich habe überhaupt nichts dagegen, wenn in Unternehmen mit 1000 Angestellten starke Arbeitnehmerrechte gelten.

Kommen wir zum anderen Hauptnachteil Kontinentaleuropas aus Ihrer Sicht: Warum ist Wagniskapital in Deutschland so viel schwerer zu bekommen als in den USA und Großbritannien?

Die Deutschen sind einfach sehr risikoavers.

Sie meinen, die Deutschen sind Feiglinge?

Ich bin mit einer Deutschen verheiratet – zitieren Sie mich auf keinen Fall so! „Risikoavers“ ist mein Wort. Wenn mein Schwiegervater liest, dass ich behaupte, die Deutschen seien Feiglinge, ist er richtig sauer. Was ich sagen will: Die Deutschen bevorzugen geringe Gewinne, die mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit eintreten gegenüber hohen Gewinnen, die weniger wahrscheinlich eintreten. Die Angelsachsen sind risikobereiter und bevorzugen das „Alles-oder-nichts“-Prinzip. In einem Casino würden Deutsche auf rot oder schwarz setzen, die Angelsachsen auf eine Zahl – also im Schnitt.

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Kommentare (3 aus 3)

Alle Kommentare »
    • Great ideas, great Interview, Great article. Thanks all.

    • Thanks you Stephan and Martin for this very cute article. I like the idea of "Baby-laws" for startups.
      Since years we are reading only bad news from Madrid/Spain. Cool, here is a guy who wants "Go do Madrid and let´s rock your Startup".

    • [...] Start-ups „Start-ups sind Baby-Firmen, die Baby-Gesetze brauchen“ Der Unternehmer Martin Varsavsky hat mehrere Telekommunikationsunternehmen in den USA und Europa gegründet – darunter FON, das weltweit möglichst flächendeckend WLAN-Hotspots aufbauen will. Der Kosmopolit kennt sich in Spanien genauso gut aus wie in den USA. Dieses Jahr verbringt er in New York und unterrichtet Entrepreneurship an der Columbia University. Mit dem Wall Street Journal Deutschland sprach Varsavksy am Rande der DLD-Konferenz in München über die Unterschiede zwischen Europa und den USA, vorsichtige Deutsche und seine Forderung nach Baby-Gesetzen für Start-ups in Deutschland. WSJ [...]

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Migrant Crackdown Sows Chaos in Europe

German Chancellor Angela Merkel called on Europe to tackle the migrant crisis and agree on a fair distribution of people, warning that failing to do so might put the EU’s open-border policy at risk.

Russia Puts Off Data Showdown With Technology Firms

Facebook, Google and Twitter are among the U.S. companies that are getting more time to comply with a new law requiring Russian data centers.

Large Blast Reported in Chinese City

An explosion ripped through an industrial zone in northeastern China just two weeks after a chemical blast killed more than 150 people and raised concerns about industrial safety in China.

Oil Surges as Supply Estimates Shrink

Oil prices soared Monday, marking their strongest three-day rally since Iraq’s 1990 invasion of Kuwait, on doubts the global glut of crude would be as long-lasting as many investors and traders had earlier believed. 59

Ukrainian National Guard Officer Killed, Dozens Injured in Protest Blast

One member of Ukraine’s National Guard was killed and at least 69 others were injured outside the country’s parliament, as fighting broke out between protesters and law-enforcement officers.

Inside Kellogg’s Effort to Cash In on the Health-Food Craze

Fixing its Kashi brand, says the CEO, is key to bulking up sales in the fast-growing natural and organic food aisles.

Service Providers See Gold in Shares of Startups

Branding firm Red Antler is among vendors that are looking to profit on the soaring valuations of young startups by taking payment in stock instead of cash.

Samsung Takes Smartwatch Fight to Apple

Samsung plans to unveil a new smartwatch, as the company attempts to prove that it can outshine Apple on design in a nascent product category.

Apple and Cisco Unveil a Business Partnership

Apple and Cisco Systems are teaming up to help bring more iPhones and iPads to business users.

Patent-Law Change Would Raise Medical Costs

A patent law change pushed by the pharmaceutical industry could cost federal health-care programs $1.3 billion over a decade by delaying new generic drugs, the Congressional Budget Office estimates.

Google, Sanofi Team Up on Diabetes Research

The Internet company said its health-care research unit plans to work with European pharmaceutical major Sanofi on new ways to monitor and treat the condition.

Tokyo Court: Nomura Wrongfully Dismissed U.S. Executive

Japan’s largest brokerage wrongfully dismissed an American managing director during a dispute over compensation for a product he invented, the Tokyo District Court ruled.

China Data Pulls Down Asian Shares

Asian markets fell Tuesday, pressured by disappointing manufacturing data that added to concerns about the health of China’s economy.

David Einhorn’s Greenlight Takes a Beating in August

The firm told investors it lost 5.3% in August as the value of its major holdings declined, said people familiar with the matter, widening its loss for the year to 13.8%.

BNY Catches Up With Pricing Backlog

Bank of New York Mellon said it had updated pricing data for mutual and exchange-traded fund-pricing issues before the market opened Monday, ending a weeklong struggle by the company to provide accurate asset values.

Sports

At the U.S. Open, Djokovic Struggles to Close

Novak Djokovic—the best and most consistent tennis player in the world for five years now—has only won U.S. Open one time in his career.

World

Islamic State Blows Up Palmyra Ruins

Islamic State has partially destroyed Palmyra’s 2,000-year-old Temple of Bel in a massive explosion, the latest in a series of attacks by the militants on the Syrian city’s famed historic sites. 171

Turkey Arrests Vice News Journalists

A Turkish court ordered the formal arrest of three Vice News journalists on terrorism-related charges, days after detaining the foreign nationals as they covered a mounting Kurdish insurgency in the country.

Blue Bell Ice Cream Returns to Store Shelves

Cartons of Blue Bell ice cream began reappearing in grocery stores in cities Monday, a major step after the ice-cream maker yanked all its products following a deadly listeria outbreak and faced a financial crisis.

Crackdown on Racial Bias Boosts Some Auto-Loan Costs

A federal regulator’s campaign to fight bias against minorities is changing the way many car loans are priced, a move that is increasing costs for some consumers. 153

StubHub Gets Out of ‘All-In’ Pricing

Nearly two years after shifting to “all-in” pricing, ticket-resale giant StubHub is reversing course and returning to its old system of adding 15% to 17% at the last minute.

U.K. Approves Giant North Sea Gas Project

A.P. Møller-Maersk A/S said it has received approval to develop the $4.5 billion Culzean gas field, the largest new find in the U.K. North Sea for a decade.

Iran Deal Could Open Door to Gulf Businesses

While executives in the Gulf see opportunities, the region’s governments remain at loggerheads on other issues.

Video

Ukraine Protest Blast Kills Officer, Injures Dozens

0:45

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11