The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search
IMAGE 1 of 16

Hungary Blinks as Migrants Flee

Hungary said Friday it would provide buses to take migrants to the Austrian border after a stream of people who have been stranded in the country for days set out for the border on foot. Austria and Germany agreed to allow in the refugees. 228

G-20 Increasingly Concerned About Slowing Chinese Economy

China’s market routs and a string of weak data are fueling concern among Group of 20 officials that a slowing Chinese economy could fuel further market instability and push global growth deeper into a long-term rut.

London Jewel Thieves Plead Guilty in Easter Heist

Four men pleaded guilty on Friday to conspiracy for a jewel heist in London’s Hatton Garden diamond district over the Easter weekend.

U.S. Veterans Who Fight ISIS

A former Army Ranger and a decorated Marine are among U.S. veterans volunteering to join Kurdish fighters against Islamic State in Syria. 65

Clashes in Tajikistan Leave 17 Dead

An outbreak of violence in Tajikistan left 17 people dead on Friday, raising fears of a return to unrest in a Central Asian nation still scarred by civil war.

Google Pursuing a Return to China

Google is in talks with the Chinese government and handset makers about launching a new Android app store there, a move that would mark the company’s return to China.

Blurry Job Picture Poses Test for Fed

U.S. employment growth slowed in August but the jobless rate fell to the lowest level since 2008, a mixed labor-market reading less than two weeks before a crucial Federal Reserve meeting. 230

Putin Pitches for Foreign Investment in Russia’s Far East

Russian President Vladimir Putin has made a pitch for greater investment in his country’s resource-rich Far East region, despite a slowdown in the Chinese economy that has shaken global markets.

Chinese Navy Ships Passed Through U.S. Waters

The Pentagon said five Chinese navy ships operating off Alaska in recent days had come within 12 nautical miles of the coast, entering U.S. territorial waters, but complying with international law. 350

From Piles of Trash Sprout Demands for Change in Lebanon

Protests demanding political reform bridge country’s longtime political, religious and ethnic divides.

Prominent Druse Cleric Killed in Syria Bombing

Two explosions went off Friday near a hospital in a province in southern Syria, killing a prominent antigovernment cleric and at least seven others.

Weekend Investor

No Emerging Markets in Your Portfolio? Look Again

Some foreign-stock mutual funds have 30% or 40% of assets in developing nations.

Heard on the Street

This Plastics IPO Is Timed Right – For the Seller

Bayer’s material science division, now called Covestro, had a strong first-half ahead of a planned initial public offering. That looks hard to keep up.

U.K. Regulator Warns Commodity Firms About Market Abuse

The U.K.’s financial regulator said firms that trade commodities have learned little from recent high-profile cases of market abuse and are failing to adequately monitor the risks of such abuse.

Stocks Drop After Jobs Report

U.S. stocks fell Friday, capping their second-worst weekly performance of the year, after a jobs report that failed to provide much clarity on when the U.S. Federal Reserve will raise short-term interest rates. 68

Brussels Beat

EU Displaces U.S. as Top Antitrust Cop

The European Union’s antitrust activism has put it in prime position to shape the Internet and is encouraging some U.S. technology executives to focus on Brussels.

Daimler, Renault Reboot Tiny Car

Daimler is taking another crack at the U.S. market for ultra-compacts with a retooled version of its ForTwo Smart car built through a collaboration that could become a benchmark for other auto makers. 70

Volkswagen CFO Nominated as Board Chairman

The largest shareholder of Europe’s biggest auto maker nominated the company’s CFO to become the next chairman of VW’s supervisory board.

BASF, Gazprom Renew Abandoned Asset-Swap Plan

Germany’s BASF and Russia’s Gazprom will complete an asset-swap deal signed in 2013 but called off last year amid tension between Russia and the West.

GVC Wins Race to Acquire Bwin.party

Sports-betting and online-gambling operator GVC Holdings PLC said it had clinched a deal to buy Bwin.party Digital Entertainment PLC after beating an offer from online-gambling peer 888 Holdings PLC.

Fashion

How Fashion Experts Shop the High Street

Despite the crowds, the lines and the overpacked rails, there are real gems to be found in mainstream stores—you just need to know how to find them.

Will Lyons on Wine

What’s the Point of Scoring Wines?

A wine’s taste and character change almost daily, and taste is subjective—so is giving them marks a pointless exercise?

Theater

Michael Grandage: A Director’s DNA

With ‘Photograph 51’ at London’s Noël Coward Theatre, the acclaimed director coaxes Nicole Kidman back onstage for an exploration of the passion and poetry of science.

Going Native in NYC: 8 Things to Do as an Expat in the Big Apple

You’re relocating to the Center of the Universe, a.k.a. the Capital of the World, a.k.a. the City That Never Sleeps. So what do you do to embrace New York?

Video

Migrants Vow to March From Hungary to Austria

1:24

Migrants Refuse to Go to Refugee Camp in Hungary

1:59

Father of Aylan Kurdi Speaks at Funeral

0:58

Mind and Matter

The Power of Brains to Keep Growing

Not long ago, scientists thought that after infancy, our brains never added any neurons. Patricia Churchland on how brains keep growing

Film Review

‘La Jaula de Oro (The Golden Dream)’ Review: Dark Immigrant Odyssey

In Diego Quemada-Diez’s celebrated directorial debut, a trio of teenagers flee from Guatemala and make their way through a treacherous Mexico, where police and gangsters prey on vulnerable travelers.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

„Start-ups sind Baby-Firmen, die Baby-Gesetze brauchen“

Der Unternehmer Martin Varsavsky hat mehrere Telekommunikationsunternehmen in den USA und Europa gegründet – darunter FON, das weltweit möglichst flächendeckend WLAN-Hotspots aufbauen will. Der Kosmopolit kennt sich in Spanien genauso gut aus wie in den USA. Dieses Jahr verbringt er in New York und unterrichtet Entrepreneurship an der Columbia University. Mit dem Wall Street Journal Deutschland sprach Varsavksy am Rande der DLD-Konferenz in München über die Unterschiede zwischen Europa und den USA, vorsichtige Deutsche und seine Forderung nach Baby-Gesetzen für Start-ups in Deutschland.

WSJ Tech: Sie kennen New York, Miami und Madrid. Wenn Sie heute ein neues Unternehmen gründen würden – wo wäre das?

Martin Varsavsky: Das kommt auf die Art des Unternehmens an. Ich habe viel Zeit mit Nachforschungen verbracht, um zu entscheiden, wo ich die weiteren FON-Büros für die USA eröffnen könnte, um zu wachsen. Ich habe mir dazu Brooklyn in New York, die Bay Area und Miami angesehen. Meine Entscheidung fiel auf Miami, was vollkommen ungewöhnlich ist – es gibt dort kein einziges Tech-Unternehmen. Aber ich bin 1995 schon nach Madrid gezogen, wo es ebenfalls kein einziges Technologie-Unternehmen gab – mit gutem Ergebnis. Damals haben die Leute gesagt, dass ich verrückt bin, als ich Madrid als Standort wählte.

Warum haben Sie sich dennoch für Madrid und Miami entschieden?

Im Grunde geht es um Wahrscheinlichkeiten. Sagen wir, es gibt sechs Millionen Leute an einem Ort wie Miami. Wenn die Bevölkerung zufällig verteilt ist, wird ein Teil davon Programmierer werden wollen, findet aber keinen Job. Im Falle von Miami gehen diese Leute dann ins Silicon Valley, nach San Francisco, Boston oder New York. In Spanien ist das ähnlich: Diese Leute gehen nach Deutschland, Frankreich, Großbritannien. Wenn Sie aber vor Ort ein Tech-Unternehmen starten und wettbewerbsfähige Gehälter anbieten, finden Sie schnell heraus, dass es dort geeignete Leute gibt, die bislang einfach keinen geeigneten Job gefunden haben. Wenn ich in Europa gründen würde, dann fiele meine Wahl auf Spanien, weil es dort nur sehr wenige Tech-Unternehmen gibt und eine unglaubliche Arbeitslosigkeit. Das bietet riesengroße Möglichkeiten, Leute zu beschäftigen. Und wenn ich in den USA gründen würde, dann in Miami.

In Spanien sind vor allem Jugendliche zu großen Teilen arbeitslos, viele davon gut ausgebildet. Warum konkurrieren nicht mehr Unternehmen um dieses Potenzial?

Ja, fast 50 Prozent der unter 30-Jährigen sind arbeitslos. Wir stellen sehr viele Leute unter 30 ein. Aber Spanien leidet unter einem Mangel an Unternehmertum. Leider wachsen die meisten Leute in Spanien mit der Vorstellung auf, Angestellte werden zu wollen – am besten bei der Regierung. Sie wollen Sicherheit, sie haben Angst vor Unsicherheit. Das gilt für ganz Europa aber für Spanien gilt das ganz besonders. Das ist aber auch der Grund, warum manche Unternehmen dorthin gehen. Ich bin von den USA nach Spanien gezogen und war erfolgreich. Der drittreichste Mann der Welt, Amancio Ortega, baute seine Firma in La Coruña auf – sein Unternehmen ist 55 Milliarden US-Dollar wert, er ist reicher als Waren Buffett. Er hat die wertvollste europäische Firma der letzten 40 Jahr gegründet. Es ist ein bisschen wie mit den Pythons, die nach Florida eingeschleppt und dort ohne natürliche Feinde zur Plage wurden. Wenn Sie als guter Unternehmer nach Spanien gehen, sind Sie die Python. Sie fragen sich, wo alle anderen sind. Das Problem ist, dass es nicht genug davon gibt.

Es ist also eine Frage der Kultur?

Wenn Sie mich dazu zwingen, eine historische Erklärung zu nennen: Spanien hat einen großer Fehler begangen, als es 1492 alle Juden verbannte. Sehen Sie sich Spanien vor 1492 an, wie erfolgreich es zum Beispiel damit war, Amerika zu erobern. Ich bin jüdisch und habe daher keine objektive Sicht auf das Thema. Aber ich glaube, dass es keine tolle Idee war, alle Juden loszuwerden. Erst haben die Spanier ihr Unternehmertun quasi an die Juden outgesourct und sind sie dann losgeworden. Plötzlich war nicht mehr viel Unternehmertum übrig.

Sie haben Unternehmen sowohl in den USA als auch in Europa gegründet – was glauben Sie, sind die Hauptunterschiede für Unternehmer?

Ich habe dazu einen sehr langen Artikel in meinem Blog geschrieben: „Advice for US Entrepreneurs who move to Europe“. Um die Hauptunterschiede zusammenzufassen: Das Rechtssystem ist in Europa deutlich besser als in den USA. Europa ist in dieser Hinsicht viel wettbewerbsfähiger, weil Anwälte hier deutlich weniger wichtig sind und es weniger juristische Streitigkeiten gibt. Europa hat bessere Gesundheitssysteme, weil die Gesundheitskosten nicht dartig steigen. In den USA sind sowohl die Kosten für Rechtsstreitigkeiten als auch für die Gesundheitsversorgung einfach nur verrückt. Europa ist außerdem besser darin, den Durchschnittsbürger zu bilden, während Amerika die Elite besser ausbildet. Europa glänzt in der Mitte, die USA sind in den Extremen stark – positiv wie negativ. Sie haben sowohl die am wenigstens gebildeten Leute als auch die gebildetsten – und Europa hat die Mitte.

Und was sind die Nachteile in Europa?

Negativ in Europa ist der Mangel eines gemeinsamen Marktes. Es gibt zwar die Europäische Union, und es gibt einen freien Warenaustausch – aber noch immer bestehen viele Hindernisse bei einheitlicher Werbung, Sprache, Kultur. In den USA ist es außerdem sehr viel einfacher, an Kapital zu kommen, es gibt mehr Wagniskapital und es ist in Amerika deutlich akzeptierter, zu scheitern. Privatinsolvenzen gibt es zwar auch in Europa, sie sind aber kein so einfaches Verfahren wie in den USA. Außerdem gibt es in Europa viele Gesetze, die Arbeitnehmer schützen sollen, aber Start-ups behindern.

Was sollte Deutschland Ihrer Meinung nach tun, um die Start-up-Kultur zu fördern?

Deutschland sollte ein eigenes Regelwerk für Unternehmen aufstellen, die drei Bedingungen erfüllen: Firmen, die jünger als drei Jahre sind, weniger als 20 Angestellte haben und Verluste machen. Meiner Meinung nach sollte die gesamte Sozialgesetzgebung bei diesen Unternehmen nicht greifen. Sobald sie dann entweder anfangen Geld zu verdienen oder mehr als 20 Angestellte haben oder älter als drei Jahre sind, sollten alle Gesetze angewendet werden. Damit würden Sie den Unternehmen in einer sehr kritischen Phase eine Chance geben. In ganz Europa gelten dieselben Gesetze für Siemens und den kleinen Unternehmer, der gerade anfängt. Diese gesamte Sozialgesetzgebung – zum Beispiel in Bezug auf Schwangerschaften – funktioniert, wenn Sie 100 Angestellte haben. Aber stellen Sie sich vor, Sie haben zwei Angestellte – und eine davon wird schwanger. Das ist wie ein umgekehrter Lottogewinn. Die Gesetze funktionieren nicht für Start-ups. Start-ups sind Babys. Und Baby-Unternehmen sollten wie Babys behandelt werden. Sobald sie groß genug sind, um erwachsen zu sein, sollten sie wie Erwachsene behandelt werden.

Spaniens stark regulierter Arbeitsmarkt ist besonders in der Kritik…

Ich habe Unternehmen gegründet, die von einer Ein-Mann-Firma zu Unternehmen mit über 1000 Angestellten gewachsen sind. Ich persönlich habe heute als Unternehmer an Europas Arbeitsgesetzen nicht viel auszusetzen. Wenn Sie über 1000 Leute beschäftigen, sind die Arbeitsgesetze für Spanien überwiegend in Ordnung. Ein Problem haben Sie, wenn sie zehn haben. Ich habe nichts grundsätzlich gegen Arbeitnehmerrechte – sie sind gut, sie schützen die Leute. Ich habe überhaupt nichts dagegen, wenn in Unternehmen mit 1000 Angestellten starke Arbeitnehmerrechte gelten.

Kommen wir zum anderen Hauptnachteil Kontinentaleuropas aus Ihrer Sicht: Warum ist Wagniskapital in Deutschland so viel schwerer zu bekommen als in den USA und Großbritannien?

Die Deutschen sind einfach sehr risikoavers.

Sie meinen, die Deutschen sind Feiglinge?

Ich bin mit einer Deutschen verheiratet – zitieren Sie mich auf keinen Fall so! „Risikoavers“ ist mein Wort. Wenn mein Schwiegervater liest, dass ich behaupte, die Deutschen seien Feiglinge, ist er richtig sauer. Was ich sagen will: Die Deutschen bevorzugen geringe Gewinne, die mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit eintreten gegenüber hohen Gewinnen, die weniger wahrscheinlich eintreten. Die Angelsachsen sind risikobereiter und bevorzugen das „Alles-oder-nichts“-Prinzip. In einem Casino würden Deutsche auf rot oder schwarz setzen, die Angelsachsen auf eine Zahl – also im Schnitt.

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Kommentare (3 aus 3)

Alle Kommentare »
    • Great ideas, great Interview, Great article. Thanks all.

    • Thanks you Stephan and Martin for this very cute article. I like the idea of "Baby-laws" for startups.
      Since years we are reading only bad news from Madrid/Spain. Cool, here is a guy who wants "Go do Madrid and let´s rock your Startup".

    • [...] Start-ups „Start-ups sind Baby-Firmen, die Baby-Gesetze brauchen“ Der Unternehmer Martin Varsavsky hat mehrere Telekommunikationsunternehmen in den USA und Europa gegründet – darunter FON, das weltweit möglichst flächendeckend WLAN-Hotspots aufbauen will. Der Kosmopolit kennt sich in Spanien genauso gut aus wie in den USA. Dieses Jahr verbringt er in New York und unterrichtet Entrepreneurship an der Columbia University. Mit dem Wall Street Journal Deutschland sprach Varsavksy am Rande der DLD-Konferenz in München über die Unterschiede zwischen Europa und den USA, vorsichtige Deutsche und seine Forderung nach Baby-Gesetzen für Start-ups in Deutschland. WSJ [...]

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search
IMAGE 1 of 16

Hungary Blinks as Migrants Flee

Hungary said Friday it would provide buses to take migrants to the Austrian border after a stream of people who have been stranded in the country for days set out for the border on foot. Austria and Germany agreed to allow in the refugees. 229

London Jewel Thieves Plead Guilty in Easter Heist

Four men pleaded guilty on Friday to conspiracy for a jewel heist in London’s Hatton Garden diamond district over the Easter weekend.

U.S. Veterans Who Fight ISIS

A former Army Ranger and a decorated Marine are among U.S. veterans volunteering to join Kurdish fighters against Islamic State in Syria. 65

Clashes in Tajikistan Leave 17 Dead

An outbreak of violence in Tajikistan left 17 people dead on Friday, raising fears of a return to unrest in a Central Asian nation still scarred by civil war.

Google Pursuing a Return to China

Google is in talks with the Chinese government and handset makers about launching a new Android app store there, a move that would mark the company’s return to China.

Blurry Job Picture Poses Test for Fed

U.S. employment growth slowed in August but the jobless rate fell to the lowest level since 2008, a mixed labor-market reading less than two weeks before a crucial Federal Reserve meeting. 230

Judge Orders Credit Suisse to Pay Highland $287.5M in Suit Over Loan

A judge on Friday said Credit Suisse must pay a unit of Highland Capital Management $287.5 million over a soured real-estate loan, a win for James Dondero’s hedge-fund firm in its multipronged fight against the Swiss bank over luxury developments.