The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

EU Leaders to Hold Emergency Meeting on Migration Crisis

European Union interior and home affairs ministers will hold an emergency meeting on September 14, the Luxembourg presidency said, in a bid to step up action to handle the biggest wave of migration since World War II.

Fed Appears to Hold Line on Rate Plan

Federal Reserve officials emerged from a week of head-spinning financial turbulence largely sticking to their plan to raise U.S. interest rates before the end of the year.

Some Stock-Market Experts Still Bracing For More Trouble

The big question worrying investors now is whether last week’s rally is sustainable or just the prelude to another storm.

VW Is Told to Shed Suzuki Stake

An international court has ordered Volkswagen of Germany to sell its nearly 20% stake in Suzuki, allowing the Japanese auto maker to extricate itself from the tie-up after a four-year struggle.

The Outlook

U.S. Port Traffic Hinted at China Slowdown

Long before investors lost faith in the Chinese stock market, something seemed amiss at the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles. The number of containers coming from China was up, but beginning in 2013, fewer were being sent in the other direction.

China Slowdown to Hit Asia Electronics Supply Chain

After several years of torrid expansion, the slowdown in smartphone sales in China is expected to hit Asian parts suppliers.

Eni Reports Natural Gas Discovery off Egypt

Eni SpA said it made a massive natural-gas discovery off the coast of Egypt in what the Italian oil-and-gas company is calling the largest ever find in the Mediterranean Sea.

Rice Condemns Pakistan-Based Militant Attacks in Afghanistan

U.S. national security adviser Susan Rice on Sunday told top civilian and military leaders in Islamabad that attacks in neighboring Afghanistan by Pakistan-based militants were “absolutely unacceptable,” according to a senior American official.

Lebanese Official Defies Calls to Resign

A top Lebanese official defied demands from thousands of protesters over the weekend to step down, providing potential fuel for a growing antigovernment movement that is coalesced around uncollected trash.

Saudi-led Airstrike Kills 20 in Yemen

A Saudi-led air raid killed at least 20 workers at a factory in northern Yemen, a local official and a resident said, the latest carnage in the conflict between Yemeni rebels and forces allied with the country’s exiled president.

At Least 11 Die in Saudi Arabia Fire

A large fire at a residential compound of Saudi Arabia’s state-owned oil giant killed at least 11 people and injured more than 200, officials said.

Malaysia Protesters Face Uphill Battle to Dislodge Najib

Tens of thousands of protesters took to the streets of Malaysia’s capital over the weekend to rally against Prime Minister Najib Razak, but analysts say the leader of the resource-rich nation is still in a strong position.

China Places Cap on Local Government Debt

Chinese lawmakers have placed a $2.5 trillion cap on local government debt as Beijing looks for ways to address one of the major impediments to its economy.

Buying the Dips Doesn’t Work for Everyone

The old strategy of buying the dips may not work for everyone. In fact, for some people, it could be disastrous, writes Jason Zweig.

Stock Swings Don’t Shake Investors

Stock indexes’ wildest week in years rattled investors and fueled expectations for further price swings, but it failed to squelch the belief U.S. markets remain the best place to put money. 61

Puerto Rico Extends Deadline for Draft Restructuring

Puerto Rico’s governor extended a Sunday deadline for a group of government officials to deliver a draft of a restructuring plan that is widely anticipated by investors.

Suppliers Feel Pain as Coal Miners Struggle

As big coal miners struggle, their equipment suppliers—thousands of businesses sprinkled throughout Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky—are scrambling to find new customers anywhere they can. 59

Ageas to Sell Hong Kong Life Insurance Business

Belgian insurance company Ageas said Sunday it will sell its Hong Kong Life insurance business to Chinese asset-management firm JD Capital for €1.23 billion.

Inmarsat Says Russian Proton Rocket Puts Satellite Into Orbit

Inmarsat declared the launch of a Russian Proton rocket carrying one of its satellites a success after the rocket delivered its cargo into its initial orbit position.

Rebekah Brooks to Return to News Corp

Rebekah Brooks is expected to head News Corp’s U.K. division, a position similar to one she resigned from amid the phone-hacking scandal. Separately, Britain’s Crown Prosecution Service is reviewing a police referral related to the hacking probe.

Hackers Are the New Wizards

Chuck Wendig’s “Zeroes” reminds us how interconnected we all are, with electronic links all the way down to our refrigerators and cars, all of them hackable.

The Real Roots of Russia’s Revolution

Before revolution was a ruinous war. What led Russia into the conflagration?

Books

A Runaway Boy, a Theatrical Dynasty and a Cliffhanger

Brian Selznick’s ‘The Marvels’ is the latest in a loose trilogy including ‘Hugo’ and ‘Wonderstruck.’

Stieg Larsson’s Heroine Lives Again

David Lagercrantz’s “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” revives Lisbeth Salander in fitting style.

World War II’s Greatest Escape

Allied prisoners broke out of a German camp using ladders inspired by medieval siege tools.

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09

Style & Fashion

Phone Cases: The New It Fashion Accessory?

Over the past few years, the iPhone case has gone from pragmatic protector to style statement. One writer plays catch up.

Music

Foals’ ‘What Went Down’ Is a Visceral Confessional

Yannis Philippakis, the lead singer whose energetic stage presence and novelistic lyrics have made Foals one of British rock’s most compelling propositions, talks about the band’s fourth album.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Microsofts fauler Tablet-Kompromiss

  • Kommentar
dapd

Microsofts Versuch, auf den Tablet-Markt vorzustoßen, wird von einem faulen Kompromiss begleitet: Ein Betriebssystem namens Windows 8 soll die Antwort auf alles sein. Das hat sich schon bei der Benutzeroberfläche als fatal bewiesen. Windows 8 ist weder Fisch noch Fleisch – weder optimal für den Tablet-Einsatz und noch weniger für den Desktop geeignet. Das liegt daran, dass Microsoft versucht, zwei völlig verschiedene Bedienkonzepte unter einen Hut zu bringen – Maus und Tastatur auf der einen und die Fingersteuerung der Tablets auf der anderen Seite.

Doch der faule Kompromiss wird auch noch an anderer Stelle deutlich: beim nutzbaren Speicher. Inzwischen hat Microsoft einen Bericht des Blogs “The Verge” gegenüber verschiedenen Medien bestätigt, nachdem beim angekündigten Tablet Surface Pro ein Großteil des Speichers durch das System belegt wird. Die Pro-Version ist das Tablet-Modell von Microsoft, auf dem dank Intel-Prozessor auch klassische Windows-Software lauffähig ist.

Von 64 Gigabyte Speicher bleiben 23 für den Anwender

Von der 64-Gigabyte-Version des Tablets bleiben dem Nutzer so nur magere 23 Gigabyte für Daten und Apps. Windows 8 ist, so wie es Microsoft einsetzt, ein System, das überall überzeugen muss – vom Hochleitsungsserver über den Desktop-PC bis zum Tablet. Damit schleppt es eine ganze Reihe Ballast mit, den auf dem Tablet niemand braucht. Schon bei Microsofts Surface ohne den Zusatz “Pro” war die geringe nutzbare Speichermenge aufgefallen, ebenso wie bei anderen Tablets für Windows 8 wie dem Yoga-PC von Lenovo. Beim teureren Surface-Modell mit 128 Gigabyte Flashspeicher ist das Verhältnis immerhin nicht ganz so unausgeglichen – hier bleiben 83 Gigabyte übrig.

Beim iPad ist ein Großteil des Speichers nutzbar

Beim iPad ist das anders. Weil Apple das eigene, speziell angepasste mobile Betriebssystem iOS einsetzt, können Apple-Nutzer fast den gesamten vorhandenen Speicher nutzen. Das System benötigt nur etwas mehr als ein Gigabyte der Speicherausstattung, die bei Apples iPads von 16 bis 128 Gigabyte reicht.

Im Grunde hätte Microsoft aus der Vergangenheit lernen können: Schon um die Jahrtausendwende pries der damalige Vorstandschef Bill Gates Tablet-PCs als die Zukunft und stellte mit Hardware-Partnern Modelle vor, die allesamt auf dem Markt scheiterten. Neben den der damaligen Technik geschuldeten Defiziten wie klobigen Formen und kurzen Akkulaufzeiten konnte vor allem das Bedienkonzept in Kombination mit klassischer Windows-Software nicht überzeugen. Erst als Apple 2007 mit dem iPhone und 2010 mit dem iPad alle alten Zöpfe abschnitt und das Mobile Computing als völlige neue Art Computer zu benutzen erkannte, gelang dem Konzept der Durchbruch.

Wenn sich die Geschichte der Windows-Desaster wiederholt, wird Microsoft wie bei Windows Vista seine Fehler erkennen und mit Windows 9 alles besser machen. Dann gäbe es künftig zwei Windows-Versionen – eine für Tablets und Smartphones und eine für des Desktop-PC. Die Nutzer würden es Microsoft danken.

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Kommentare (5 aus 8)

Alle Kommentare »
    • btw. "Ich persönlich finde diese Art der Speichererweiterung allerdings nicht besonders bequem"

      Seagate Satellite - 500 GB 2,5 Zoll - ganz Wireless

      Da kann der Speicher auch in der Tasche bleiben. Unbequem sieht anders aus.

    • Also, Schwächen hin, Schwächen her, ich bin Microsoft dankbar für den Spagat, welchen Sie versuchen. Und ich hoffe, das er gelingt. Ich mag die Handlichkeit von Tablets sowohl in der Freizeit, wie auch im Büro.

      Das iPad leistet hierbei gute Dienste, aber es kommt einfach nicht über den Status des Medien konsumierens und präsentierens hinaus. Warum? Weil es einfach die professionellen Anwendungen des Büroalltags nicht anbieten kann (Ingenieuralltag). Es gibt für viele dieser Anwendungen Apps die ähnlich gut sind? Mag sein, aber habe ich weder Zeit noch Lust diese nur des iPads wegen in meinen Workflow einzubinden.

      Mit i5 und i7, mit Intel Grafik und HDMI Ausgang, wird das Win8 Tablet an einem 24 Zoll Screen fast zum Desktopersatz. Zumindest kann es locker dem Vergleich mit Ultrabooks und Desktops der mittleren Preisklasse standhalten. Das iPad kann nicht, was der Mac Mini kann.

      Früher hatte man zwei Geräte im Gepäck. Telefon und Laptop. Heute oftmals drei. Wenn ich durch Microsoft daraus wieder zwei machen kann. Sehr gut. Da nehme ich auch externen Speicher in kauf. In Zeiten von 1TB und 2TB externen Festplatten im 2.5 Zoll Formfaktor sind, zumindest meine, Daten eh mobil. Ganz ohne Cloud.

    • Es ist ein kleiner Slot in der man die miniSD Karte einsteht. Man muss noch nicht mal irgendwas auseinanderbauen, und nicht schaut heraus. Das ist weder kompliziert noch hässlich.
      Dazu: haben Sie viel Offline-Speicher auf ihrem Gerät, müssen Sie davon auch ein Backup machen. Das läuft heutzutage bei großen Datenmenge ja üblicherweise über USB-Platten. Speicher ohne die Möglichkeit, die 100GB Videos und Bilder mal sichern zu können, ist eher gefährlich. Auch hier ein Punkt für Windows der hier in der Betrachtung fehlt.

      Aber ich will gar nicht mit Ihnen über solche Sachen diskutieren, was mich stört ist die Einseitigkeit, das nicht-die-andere-Seite-fragen und das simple Weitergeben von Mainstream-Artikel ohne etwas zu prüfen oder zu hinterfragen.
      Ich schätze WSJ (insb. US) gerade dafür, dass sie nicht einfach der Herde folgen sondern sich bemühen, ausgewogen zu berichten und andere Seiten zu beleuchten. Ihr US-Kollege Herr Mossberg z.B. ist da ein gutes Vorbild was technische Artikel angeht. Ich fände es gut, wenn dieser Geist des Journalismus sich in den Ländern fortsetzen würde.

    • Sorry, ich bin Anonymous.

    • Genau, es ist ein kleiner Slot in der man die miniSD Karte einsteckt. Man muss noch nicht mal irgendwas auseinanderbauen, und nicht schaut heraus. Das ist nicht komplizierter als einen USB-Stick einzustecken, das bekommen auch einfach User hin.

      Dazu: haben Sie viel Offline-Speicher auf ihrem Gerät, müssen Sie davon auch ein Backup machen. Das läuft heutzutage bei großen Datenmenge ja üblicherweise über USB-Platten. Offline-Speicher ohne die Möglichkeit, die 100GB Videos und Bilder mal sichern zu können, ist eher gefährlich. Auch hier ein Punkt für Windows, der hier in der Betrachtung fehlt.

      Aber ich will gar nicht mit Ihnen über solche Sachen diskutieren, was mich stört ist die Einseitigkeit, das nicht-die-andere-Seite-fragen und das simple Weitergeben von Mainstream-Artikel ohne etwas zu prüfen oder zu hinterfragen.
      Ich schätze WSJ (insb. US) gerade dafür, dass sie nicht einfach der Herde folgen sondern sich bemühen, ausgewogen zu berichten und die andere Seiten zu beleuchten. Ihr US-Kollege Herr Mossberg z.B. ist da ein gutes Vorbild was technische Artikel angeht. Ich fände es gut, wenn dieser Geist des Journalismus sich in den Ländern fortsetzen würde. Ein simpler Re-Tweet ist kein Inhalt und kein Mehrwert.

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

EU Leaders to Hold Emergency Meeting on Migration Crisis

European Union interior and home affairs ministers will hold an emergency meeting on September 14, the Luxembourg presidency said, in a bid to step up action to handle the biggest wave of migration since World War II.

Fed Appears to Hold Line on Rate Plan

Federal Reserve officials emerged from a week of head-spinning financial turbulence largely sticking to their plan to raise U.S. interest rates before the end of the year.

Some Stock-Market Experts Still Bracing For More Trouble

The big question worrying investors now is whether last week’s rally is sustainable or just the prelude to another storm.

VW Is Told to Shed Suzuki Stake

An international court has ordered Volkswagen of Germany to sell its nearly 20% stake in Suzuki, allowing the Japanese auto maker to extricate itself from the tie-up after a four-year struggle.

The Outlook

U.S. Port Traffic Hinted at China Slowdown

Long before investors lost faith in the Chinese stock market, something seemed amiss at the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles. The number of containers coming from China was up, but beginning in 2013, fewer were being sent in the other direction.

China Slowdown to Hit Asia Electronics Supply Chain

After several years of torrid expansion, the slowdown in smartphone sales in China is expected to hit Asian parts suppliers.

Eni Reports Natural Gas Discovery off Egypt

Eni SpA said it made a massive natural-gas discovery off the coast of Egypt in what the Italian oil-and-gas company is calling the largest ever find in the Mediterranean Sea.

Rice Condemns Pakistan-Based Militant Attacks in Afghanistan

U.S. national security adviser Susan Rice on Sunday told top civilian and military leaders in Islamabad that attacks in neighboring Afghanistan by Pakistan-based militants were “absolutely unacceptable,” according to a senior American official.

Lebanese Official Defies Calls to Resign

A top Lebanese official defied demands from thousands of protesters over the weekend to step down, providing potential fuel for a growing antigovernment movement that is coalesced around uncollected trash.

Saudi-led Airstrike Kills 20 in Yemen

A Saudi-led air raid killed at least 20 workers at a factory in northern Yemen, a local official and a resident said, the latest carnage in the conflict between Yemeni rebels and forces allied with the country’s exiled president.

At Least 11 Die in Saudi Arabia Fire

A large fire at a residential compound of Saudi Arabia’s state-owned oil giant killed at least 11 people and injured more than 200, officials said.

Malaysia Protesters Face Uphill Battle to Dislodge Najib

Tens of thousands of protesters took to the streets of Malaysia’s capital over the weekend to rally against Prime Minister Najib Razak, but analysts say the leader of the resource-rich nation is still in a strong position.

China Places Cap on Local Government Debt

Chinese lawmakers have placed a $2.5 trillion cap on local government debt as Beijing looks for ways to address one of the major impediments to its economy.

Buying the Dips Doesn’t Work for Everyone

The old strategy of buying the dips may not work for everyone. In fact, for some people, it could be disastrous, writes Jason Zweig.

Stock Swings Don’t Shake Investors

Stock indexes’ wildest week in years rattled investors and fueled expectations for further price swings, but it failed to squelch the belief U.S. markets remain the best place to put money. 61

Puerto Rico Extends Deadline for Draft Restructuring

Puerto Rico’s governor extended a Sunday deadline for a group of government officials to deliver a draft of a restructuring plan that is widely anticipated by investors.

Suppliers Feel Pain as Coal Miners Struggle

As big coal miners struggle, their equipment suppliers—thousands of businesses sprinkled throughout Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky—are scrambling to find new customers anywhere they can. 59

Ageas to Sell Hong Kong Life Insurance Business

Belgian insurance company Ageas said Sunday it will sell its Hong Kong Life insurance business to Chinese asset-management firm JD Capital for €1.23 billion.

Inmarsat Says Russian Proton Rocket Puts Satellite Into Orbit

Inmarsat declared the launch of a Russian Proton rocket carrying one of its satellites a success after the rocket delivered its cargo into its initial orbit position.

Rebekah Brooks to Return to News Corp

Rebekah Brooks is expected to head News Corp’s U.K. division, a position similar to one she resigned from amid the phone-hacking scandal. Separately, Britain’s Crown Prosecution Service is reviewing a police referral related to the hacking probe.

Hackers Are the New Wizards

Chuck Wendig’s “Zeroes” reminds us how interconnected we all are, with electronic links all the way down to our refrigerators and cars, all of them hackable.

The Real Roots of Russia’s Revolution

Before revolution was a ruinous war. What led Russia into the conflagration?

Books

A Runaway Boy, a Theatrical Dynasty and a Cliffhanger

Brian Selznick’s ‘The Marvels’ is the latest in a loose trilogy including ‘Hugo’ and ‘Wonderstruck.’

Stieg Larsson’s Heroine Lives Again

David Lagercrantz’s “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” revives Lisbeth Salander in fitting style.

World War II’s Greatest Escape

Allied prisoners broke out of a German camp using ladders inspired by medieval siege tools.

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09