The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Global Stocks Try to Regain Footing

U.S. stock markets rebounded Wednesday after falling sharply in the previous session on deepening worries about China.

Investors Betting on More ECB Stimulus

Six months after the European Central Bank launched its blockbuster bond-buying program to rouse the region’s economy, some investors are betting that authorities will crank stimulus efforts even higher.

Hungary Struggles With Migrants

A standoff continued in Budapest, while train traffic in the English Channel tunnel was disrupted by migrants on the tracks.

U.S. Tech Firms Make Pilgrimage to Brussels

The giants of Silicon Valley are bulking up in the European Union’s de facto capital, hiring lobbyists and jostling for the favor of the Web’s most ambitious regulators.

Masked Gunmen Kidnap 18 Turkish Workers in Baghdad

Identities of gunmen in early-morning raid on sports stadium weren’t immediately known, as Turks in Iraq seized for a second time in the past year.

Rebekah Brooks to Lead News Corp’s U.K. Arm

News Corp said Wednesday that Rebekah Brooks will become Chief Executive of its News UK arm, returning to the post she resigned in 2011 amid the phone-hacking scandal at now-defunct British tabloid the News of the World.

Volkswagen Extends CEO Martin Winterkorn’s Contract

German car maker Volkswagen said it would extend the contract of Chief Executive Martin Winterkorn through 2018, ending speculation that he could step down as CEO and become chairman.

Tesco Closer to $7 Billion South Korea Deal

U.K. retailer Tesco has chosen Asian private-equity firm MBK Partners as the preferred bidder to buy its South Korea retail operations in a deal that could be worth up to $7 billion.

Elves, Ninjas, Currency Power Lego Earnings

Lego said its 31% jump in first-half profit and 23% rise in revenue was fueled by strong sales of its Ninjago and Elves sets, but also by the weakness of the Danish krone and the euro.

EU Approves Shell’s Takeover of BG Group

Oil giant Royal Dutch Shell cleared a significant hurdle in its planned takeover of natural gas firm BG Group after Europe’s top antitrust regulator approved the deal unconditionally.

Huawei Rings in Changes to Challenge Samsung

For years, Samsung Electronics has been the world’s smartphone leader, but its global dominance appears to be increasingly under attack from fast-growing Chinese rival Huawei Technologies.

South African Gold Faces Uncertain Future

South Africa’s gold mining industry must undergo radical change to cope with falling prices, intensifying labor disputes and the surging cost of ever-deeper exploration.

China Imposes New Controls to Keep Money From Leaving Country

China is imposing fresh controls to prevent too much money from leaving the country, in an effort to keep funds at home.

The Moment When Humans Matter

A string of messy market openings in recent weeks has reinvigorated a debate about the relative effectiveness of humans in the stock trade.

Malaysian Fund Has Tens of Millions of Dollars Frozen

Swiss authorities said they had frozen funds worth tens of millions of dollars linked to 1Malaysia Development Berhad as part of an investigation into alleged corruption.

Heard on the Street

Small U.K. Banks Show Big Rivals How To Travel Light

Picture a life without the baggage of the past. In the U.K., smaller banks are showing established rivals how that could be.

Two Red Cross Workers Shot and Killed in Yemen

A gunman opened fire on cars marked with aid group’s insignia as they drove from northern Saada province to the capital, San’a.

The Iran Nuclear Deal Explained

Iran has reached a historic agreement with major world powers over its nuclear program. Here are the main points of the pact, and what supporters and critics are saying.

Greek Polls Suggest Tough Election Test for Tsipras

Opinion polls show declining support for Greece’s Syriza party and its leader, Alexis Tsipras. But Syriza retains a lead over its opponents and the Sept. 20 election could be tight.

Police Say Main Bangkok Bombing Suspect Believed to Be Uighur

A senior Thai police investigator said for the first time that the main suspect in the deadly bombing at a Bangkok shrine last month is believed to be a member of China’s Uighur ethnic minority.

EU Set to Extend Sanctions on Russians, Ukraine Rebels

The EU is set to roll over sanctions targeted against almost 200 Russian and Ukrainian-separatist individuals and firms to keep pressure on Moscow to fully implement the Minsk cease-fire terms by year end.

Bush Takes Gloves Off, Attacks Trump Directly

After weeks of enduring rival Donald Trump’s attacks, Jeb Bush released an Internet video aimed at trying to muscle his way back to the front of the pack and undermine the celebrity businessman’s fitness to be the GOP standard-bearer. 325

Emails Point to Large Role for Clinton Adviser Blumenthal

Longtime aide Sidney Blumenthal maintained an outsize role with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, despite being blocked from taking a job at the department. 140

Biden to Speak at Florida Events Amid 2016 Speculation

The vice president is expected to decide this month whether he will make a third bid for the White House.

Search Continues for Three Suspects After Illinois Policeman Killed

As a small northern Illinois community mourned a popular veteran police officer who was fatally shot while on duty, authorities scoured the area overnight in search of three men wanted in his slaying.

U.S. Report Sees Economic Benefit in Allowing Oil Exports

Lifting the nation’s four-decade ban on oil exports wouldn’t raise gas prices and could help lower them, a government study concludes. 52

Video

Hungarian Police Struggle to Control Migrants

2:02

The Iran Nuclear Deal Explained

3:34

Kentucky Clerk Defies Supreme Court on Gay Marriage

1:41

Personal Tech | DxO One Review

Finally, an iPhone Camera Good Enough for a Pro

The DxO One is a tiny attachment offering a big upgrade to your iPhone camera. Geoffrey A. Fowler reviews.

WSJ. Magazine

Robert Redford: From Sundance Kid to Hollywood Legend

The legendary actor is as busy as ever, with starring roles in the film adaptation of Bill Bryson’s ‘A Walk in the Woods’ and in the forthcoming drama, ‘Truth.’

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Microsofts fauler Tablet-Kompromiss

  • Kommentar
dapd

Microsofts Versuch, auf den Tablet-Markt vorzustoßen, wird von einem faulen Kompromiss begleitet: Ein Betriebssystem namens Windows 8 soll die Antwort auf alles sein. Das hat sich schon bei der Benutzeroberfläche als fatal bewiesen. Windows 8 ist weder Fisch noch Fleisch – weder optimal für den Tablet-Einsatz und noch weniger für den Desktop geeignet. Das liegt daran, dass Microsoft versucht, zwei völlig verschiedene Bedienkonzepte unter einen Hut zu bringen – Maus und Tastatur auf der einen und die Fingersteuerung der Tablets auf der anderen Seite.

Doch der faule Kompromiss wird auch noch an anderer Stelle deutlich: beim nutzbaren Speicher. Inzwischen hat Microsoft einen Bericht des Blogs “The Verge” gegenüber verschiedenen Medien bestätigt, nachdem beim angekündigten Tablet Surface Pro ein Großteil des Speichers durch das System belegt wird. Die Pro-Version ist das Tablet-Modell von Microsoft, auf dem dank Intel-Prozessor auch klassische Windows-Software lauffähig ist.

Von 64 Gigabyte Speicher bleiben 23 für den Anwender

Von der 64-Gigabyte-Version des Tablets bleiben dem Nutzer so nur magere 23 Gigabyte für Daten und Apps. Windows 8 ist, so wie es Microsoft einsetzt, ein System, das überall überzeugen muss – vom Hochleitsungsserver über den Desktop-PC bis zum Tablet. Damit schleppt es eine ganze Reihe Ballast mit, den auf dem Tablet niemand braucht. Schon bei Microsofts Surface ohne den Zusatz “Pro” war die geringe nutzbare Speichermenge aufgefallen, ebenso wie bei anderen Tablets für Windows 8 wie dem Yoga-PC von Lenovo. Beim teureren Surface-Modell mit 128 Gigabyte Flashspeicher ist das Verhältnis immerhin nicht ganz so unausgeglichen – hier bleiben 83 Gigabyte übrig.

Beim iPad ist ein Großteil des Speichers nutzbar

Beim iPad ist das anders. Weil Apple das eigene, speziell angepasste mobile Betriebssystem iOS einsetzt, können Apple-Nutzer fast den gesamten vorhandenen Speicher nutzen. Das System benötigt nur etwas mehr als ein Gigabyte der Speicherausstattung, die bei Apples iPads von 16 bis 128 Gigabyte reicht.

Im Grunde hätte Microsoft aus der Vergangenheit lernen können: Schon um die Jahrtausendwende pries der damalige Vorstandschef Bill Gates Tablet-PCs als die Zukunft und stellte mit Hardware-Partnern Modelle vor, die allesamt auf dem Markt scheiterten. Neben den der damaligen Technik geschuldeten Defiziten wie klobigen Formen und kurzen Akkulaufzeiten konnte vor allem das Bedienkonzept in Kombination mit klassischer Windows-Software nicht überzeugen. Erst als Apple 2007 mit dem iPhone und 2010 mit dem iPad alle alten Zöpfe abschnitt und das Mobile Computing als völlige neue Art Computer zu benutzen erkannte, gelang dem Konzept der Durchbruch.

Wenn sich die Geschichte der Windows-Desaster wiederholt, wird Microsoft wie bei Windows Vista seine Fehler erkennen und mit Windows 9 alles besser machen. Dann gäbe es künftig zwei Windows-Versionen – eine für Tablets und Smartphones und eine für des Desktop-PC. Die Nutzer würden es Microsoft danken.

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Kommentare (5 aus 8)

Alle Kommentare »
    • btw. "Ich persönlich finde diese Art der Speichererweiterung allerdings nicht besonders bequem"

      Seagate Satellite - 500 GB 2,5 Zoll - ganz Wireless

      Da kann der Speicher auch in der Tasche bleiben. Unbequem sieht anders aus.

    • Also, Schwächen hin, Schwächen her, ich bin Microsoft dankbar für den Spagat, welchen Sie versuchen. Und ich hoffe, das er gelingt. Ich mag die Handlichkeit von Tablets sowohl in der Freizeit, wie auch im Büro.

      Das iPad leistet hierbei gute Dienste, aber es kommt einfach nicht über den Status des Medien konsumierens und präsentierens hinaus. Warum? Weil es einfach die professionellen Anwendungen des Büroalltags nicht anbieten kann (Ingenieuralltag). Es gibt für viele dieser Anwendungen Apps die ähnlich gut sind? Mag sein, aber habe ich weder Zeit noch Lust diese nur des iPads wegen in meinen Workflow einzubinden.

      Mit i5 und i7, mit Intel Grafik und HDMI Ausgang, wird das Win8 Tablet an einem 24 Zoll Screen fast zum Desktopersatz. Zumindest kann es locker dem Vergleich mit Ultrabooks und Desktops der mittleren Preisklasse standhalten. Das iPad kann nicht, was der Mac Mini kann.

      Früher hatte man zwei Geräte im Gepäck. Telefon und Laptop. Heute oftmals drei. Wenn ich durch Microsoft daraus wieder zwei machen kann. Sehr gut. Da nehme ich auch externen Speicher in kauf. In Zeiten von 1TB und 2TB externen Festplatten im 2.5 Zoll Formfaktor sind, zumindest meine, Daten eh mobil. Ganz ohne Cloud.

    • Es ist ein kleiner Slot in der man die miniSD Karte einsteht. Man muss noch nicht mal irgendwas auseinanderbauen, und nicht schaut heraus. Das ist weder kompliziert noch hässlich.
      Dazu: haben Sie viel Offline-Speicher auf ihrem Gerät, müssen Sie davon auch ein Backup machen. Das läuft heutzutage bei großen Datenmenge ja üblicherweise über USB-Platten. Speicher ohne die Möglichkeit, die 100GB Videos und Bilder mal sichern zu können, ist eher gefährlich. Auch hier ein Punkt für Windows der hier in der Betrachtung fehlt.

      Aber ich will gar nicht mit Ihnen über solche Sachen diskutieren, was mich stört ist die Einseitigkeit, das nicht-die-andere-Seite-fragen und das simple Weitergeben von Mainstream-Artikel ohne etwas zu prüfen oder zu hinterfragen.
      Ich schätze WSJ (insb. US) gerade dafür, dass sie nicht einfach der Herde folgen sondern sich bemühen, ausgewogen zu berichten und andere Seiten zu beleuchten. Ihr US-Kollege Herr Mossberg z.B. ist da ein gutes Vorbild was technische Artikel angeht. Ich fände es gut, wenn dieser Geist des Journalismus sich in den Ländern fortsetzen würde.

    • Sorry, ich bin Anonymous.

    • Genau, es ist ein kleiner Slot in der man die miniSD Karte einsteckt. Man muss noch nicht mal irgendwas auseinanderbauen, und nicht schaut heraus. Das ist nicht komplizierter als einen USB-Stick einzustecken, das bekommen auch einfach User hin.

      Dazu: haben Sie viel Offline-Speicher auf ihrem Gerät, müssen Sie davon auch ein Backup machen. Das läuft heutzutage bei großen Datenmenge ja üblicherweise über USB-Platten. Offline-Speicher ohne die Möglichkeit, die 100GB Videos und Bilder mal sichern zu können, ist eher gefährlich. Auch hier ein Punkt für Windows, der hier in der Betrachtung fehlt.

      Aber ich will gar nicht mit Ihnen über solche Sachen diskutieren, was mich stört ist die Einseitigkeit, das nicht-die-andere-Seite-fragen und das simple Weitergeben von Mainstream-Artikel ohne etwas zu prüfen oder zu hinterfragen.
      Ich schätze WSJ (insb. US) gerade dafür, dass sie nicht einfach der Herde folgen sondern sich bemühen, ausgewogen zu berichten und die andere Seiten zu beleuchten. Ihr US-Kollege Herr Mossberg z.B. ist da ein gutes Vorbild was technische Artikel angeht. Ich fände es gut, wenn dieser Geist des Journalismus sich in den Ländern fortsetzen würde. Ein simpler Re-Tweet ist kein Inhalt und kein Mehrwert.

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Global Stocks Try to Regain Footing

U.S. stock markets rebounded Wednesday after falling sharply in the previous session on deepening worries about China.

Investors Betting on More ECB Stimulus

Six months after the European Central Bank launched its blockbuster bond-buying program to rouse the region’s economy, some investors are betting that authorities will crank stimulus efforts even higher.

Hungary Struggles With Migrants

A standoff continued in Budapest, while train traffic in the English Channel tunnel was disrupted by migrants on the tracks.

U.S. Tech Firms Make Pilgrimage to Brussels

The giants of Silicon Valley are bulking up in the European Union’s de facto capital, hiring lobbyists and jostling for the favor of the Web’s most ambitious regulators.

Masked Gunmen Kidnap 18 Turkish Workers in Baghdad

Identities of gunmen in early-morning raid on sports stadium weren’t immediately known, as Turks in Iraq seized for a second time in the past year.

Rebekah Brooks to Lead News Corp’s U.K. Arm

News Corp said Wednesday that Rebekah Brooks will become Chief Executive of its News UK arm, returning to the post she resigned in 2011 amid the phone-hacking scandal at now-defunct British tabloid the News of the World.

Volkswagen Extends CEO Martin Winterkorn’s Contract

German car maker Volkswagen said it would extend the contract of Chief Executive Martin Winterkorn through 2018, ending speculation that he could step down as CEO and become chairman.

Tesco Closer to $7 Billion South Korea Deal

U.K. retailer Tesco has chosen Asian private-equity firm MBK Partners as the preferred bidder to buy its South Korea retail operations in a deal that could be worth up to $7 billion.

Elves, Ninjas, Currency Power Lego Earnings

Lego said its 31% jump in first-half profit and 23% rise in revenue was fueled by strong sales of its Ninjago and Elves sets, but also by the weakness of the Danish krone and the euro.

EU Approves Shell’s Takeover of BG Group

Oil giant Royal Dutch Shell cleared a significant hurdle in its planned takeover of natural gas firm BG Group after Europe’s top antitrust regulator approved the deal unconditionally.

Huawei Rings in Changes to Challenge Samsung

For years, Samsung Electronics has been the world’s smartphone leader, but its global dominance appears to be increasingly under attack from fast-growing Chinese rival Huawei Technologies.

South African Gold Faces Uncertain Future

South Africa’s gold mining industry must undergo radical change to cope with falling prices, intensifying labor disputes and the surging cost of ever-deeper exploration.

China Imposes New Controls to Keep Money From Leaving Country

China is imposing fresh controls to prevent too much money from leaving the country, in an effort to keep funds at home.

The Moment When Humans Matter

A string of messy market openings in recent weeks has reinvigorated a debate about the relative effectiveness of humans in the stock trade.

Malaysian Fund Has Tens of Millions of Dollars Frozen

Swiss authorities said they had frozen funds worth tens of millions of dollars linked to 1Malaysia Development Berhad as part of an investigation into alleged corruption.

Heard on the Street

Small U.K. Banks Show Big Rivals How To Travel Light

Picture a life without the baggage of the past. In the U.K., smaller banks are showing established rivals how that could be.

Two Red Cross Workers Shot and Killed in Yemen

A gunman opened fire on cars marked with aid group’s insignia as they drove from northern Saada province to the capital, San’a.

The Iran Nuclear Deal Explained

Iran has reached a historic agreement with major world powers over its nuclear program. Here are the main points of the pact, and what supporters and critics are saying.

Greek Polls Suggest Tough Election Test for Tsipras

Opinion polls show declining support for Greece’s Syriza party and its leader, Alexis Tsipras. But Syriza retains a lead over its opponents and the Sept. 20 election could be tight.

Police Say Main Bangkok Bombing Suspect Believed to Be Uighur

A senior Thai police investigator said for the first time that the main suspect in the deadly bombing at a Bangkok shrine last month is believed to be a member of China’s Uighur ethnic minority.

EU Set to Extend Sanctions on Russians, Ukraine Rebels

The EU is set to roll over sanctions targeted against almost 200 Russian and Ukrainian-separatist individuals and firms to keep pressure on Moscow to fully implement the Minsk cease-fire terms by year end.

Bush Takes Gloves Off, Attacks Trump Directly

After weeks of enduring rival Donald Trump’s attacks, Jeb Bush released an Internet video aimed at trying to muscle his way back to the front of the pack and undermine the celebrity businessman’s fitness to be the GOP standard-bearer. 325

Emails Point to Large Role for Clinton Adviser Blumenthal

Longtime aide Sidney Blumenthal maintained an outsize role with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, despite being blocked from taking a job at the department. 140

Biden to Speak at Florida Events Amid 2016 Speculation

The vice president is expected to decide this month whether he will make a third bid for the White House.

Search Continues for Three Suspects After Illinois Policeman Killed

As a small northern Illinois community mourned a popular veteran police officer who was fatally shot while on duty, authorities scoured the area overnight in search of three men wanted in his slaying.

U.S. Report Sees Economic Benefit in Allowing Oil Exports

Lifting the nation’s four-decade ban on oil exports wouldn’t raise gas prices and could help lower them, a government study concludes. 52

Video

Hungarian Police Struggle to Control Migrants

2:02

The Iran Nuclear Deal Explained

3:34

Kentucky Clerk Defies Supreme Court on Gay Marriage

1:41