The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Four Men to Face Charges Over Migrant Deaths

A Hungarian court said four men could face up to 16 years in prison for alleged people trafficking in connection with the deaths of 71 migrants found in an abandoned truck.

Turkey Bombs Islamic State Targets in Syria as Part of U.S.-Led Coalition

Turkish jets bombed Islamic State targets in Syria under the umbrella of the U.S.-led international coalition for the first time, the country’s government said, as Turkey expands its fight against the extremist group.

Egyptian Court Sentences Al Jazeera Journalists

An Egyptian judge sentenced a trio of Al Jazeera English journalists to three years in prison, prompting fresh criticism of the government’s clampdown on press and political freedoms.

Thousands March Against Lebanon Government

A demonstration in Beirut against poor waste management blossomed into full-throated demands that Lebanon’s long-standing political class step down from power.

Stock Swings Don’t Shake Investors

Stock indexes’ wildest week in years rattled investors and fueled expectations for further price swings, but it failed to squelch the belief U.S. markets remain the best place to put money. 58

Fed’s Fischer: ‘Good Reason’ to Think U.S. Inflation Will Move Higher

The Fed‘s Stanley Fischer said there is “good reason” to think sluggish U.S. inflation will firm and move back toward the U.S. central bank’s 2% annual target, touching on a significant assessment facing the Fed ahead of its September policy meeting. 67

New Orleans Honors Katrina’s Victims on Anniversary

A city known for its resilience marked the 10th anniversary of one of the worst natural disasters ever to hit the United States on Saturday, beginning with a somber ceremony at a memorial to Hurricane Katrina’s victims.

France, Germany Warn Putin on Ukraine Separatist Elections

Leaders of France and Germany told Russian President Vladimir Putin that rebel-run elections conducted in the separatist-controlled regions of Ukraine would endanger the so-called Minsk peace process.

Rice to Press Pakistan on Antiterror Vigilance

National security adviser Susan Rice is set to arrive in Pakistan on Sunday to press the country’s government to do more to prevent terrorists from using its territory as a base for attacks on neighboring states.

Treading Line Between War and Peace, U.S. Special Forces Groom Afghan Troops

The U.S. military allowed The Wall Street Journal to visit a variety of commando units, offering a glimpse into what may be the last fighting season of America’s longest war. 70

Foreign Man Arrested in Bangkok Blast Probe

Thai police said they arrested a foreign man whom they described as a suspect in this month’s deadly bombing of a Bangkok shrine that is popular with Chinese tourists.

Thousands Protest Against Malaysia’s Najib Razak

Police said an estimated 25,000 people demonstrated in the capital, protesting management of the economy and debt problems at a state investment fund.

Buying the Dips Doesn’t Work for Everyone

The old strategy of buying the dips may not work for everyone. In fact, for some people, it could be disastrous, writes Jason Zweig.

How Do You Short China?

Traders are scouring stock, bond and currency markets for ways to make money on the malaise afflicting China. Some are piling into insurance-like contracts that would pay out if the country defaulted on a small pool of its foreign-denominated bonds.

Myanmar Buzz Fades for Many U.S. Investors

Disenchantment with the business climate, especially among American companies, comes as concerns are spreading about Myanmar’s political future.

A ‘Black Swan’ Fund Made $1 Billion This Week

Universa Hedge Fund, a well-known ‘black swan’ fund, made more than $1 billion in profits in one week amid volatility. 53

Inmarsat Says Russian Proton Rocket Puts Satellite Into Orbit

Inmarsat declared the launch of a Russian Proton rocket carrying one of its satellites a success after the rocket delivered its cargo into its initial orbit position.

China’s Moves Won’t Help U.S. Tech Firms

China’s moves to spur its slowing economy are having an important but less obvious effect on the tech sector: Strengthening local companies that already were making life difficult for U.S. rivals.

European Refiners’ Profit Revival Faces End

Europe’s biggest energy companies have enjoyed a revival of refinery profits, but that run may be winding down even as oil prices slump.

Syngenta Shareholders Not Happy

Some Syngenta shareholders are angry about the pesticide-and-seed giant’s rejection of takeover proposals from rival Monsanto, which abandoned its pursuit this week.

U.S.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R., Tenn.), right, listens to Sen. John Barrasso (R., Wyo.) last month in Washington, D.C.

Foes Try New Ways To Attack Iran Deal

Congressional opponents of the Iranian nuclear accord are devising a Plan B as President Obama moves closer to locking up the support needed to implement the deal. 662

Book Reviews

Stieg Larsson’s Heroine Lives Again

David Lagercrantz’s “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” revives Lisbeth Salander in fitting style.

World War II’s Greatest Escape

Allied prisoners broke out of a German camp using ladders inspired by medieval siege tools.

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09

On Wine: Will Lyons

Why Gin Is Back With a Flourish

Gin is experiencing the kind of boom the wine industry experienced in the mid-1980s, as boutique-distilled bottles with names like Half Hitch, Opihr and Ransom Old Tom give the classic G&T a new—and flavorful—twist

Music

Foals’ ‘What Went Down’ Is a Visceral Confessional

Yannis Philippakis, the lead singer whose energetic stage presence and novelistic lyrics have made Foals one of British rock’s most compelling propositions, talks about the band’s fourth album.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Wem gehören die Follower des Papstes?

Screenshot

Nicht einmal der Vatikan weiß, was mit den Followern des Papstes nach seinem Rücktritt passiert – eine entsprechende Anfrage von WSJ Tech konnte die katholische Kirche nicht beantworten. Dabei dürfte die Sache rechtlich ziemlich eindeutig sein: Die Follower des Papst-Accounts auf Twitter – allein für den englischsprachigen Account sind es mehr als 1,5 Millionen – würden bei einer natürlich völlig theoretischen rechtlichen Auseinandersetzung wohl klar dem Vatikan zugesprochen werden. Denn Josef Ratziger twitterte klar in seiner Funktion als Papst – dafür spricht alleine schon der Name seines Twitter-Accounts: Pontifex.

Wenn Mitarbeiter twittern

Die Frage ist nicht nur theoretischer Natur – zumindest, wenn sie nicht im Zusammenhang mit dem Papst gestellt wird. Der Düsseldorfer Fachanwalt für IT-Recht Michael Terhaag berichtet von einem Fall, in dem sich ein Mitarbeiter mit seinem ehemaligen Arbeitgeber um das Eigentumsrecht von Kontakten aus dem Business-Netzwerk Xing streitet. Der Fall ist noch nicht entschieden. „Sinnvoll ist es in jedem Unternehmen, diese Frage mit dem Arbeitnehmer verbindlich zu regeln“, sagt Terhaag. Vieles sei hier gesetzlich noch nicht geregelt und falle damit in einen Graubereich. „Man sollte an den Arbeitsvertrag angeheftet kurz klären, was der Arbeitnehmer im Social Web schreiben darf, was er unter eigenem Namen machen darf und so weiter“, führt Terhaag aus.

Aber auch ohne diese Regelung gibt es Fälle, die nach Auffassung des Anwalts eindeutig sind. „Wenn wir mal spaßeshalber beim Papst bleiben – da ist es natürlich so, dass der Account dem Amt zugeordnet ist“, erläutert er. Ähnliche klare Fälle wären beispielsweise Accounts wie „Bundeskanzler“ oder „Bundeskanzlerin“, die es allerdings nicht gibt.

Facebook hat privaten Charakter

Es kommt dabei aber auch auf die Plattform an, auf der der Mitarbeiter aktiv ist. „Facebook ist zum Beispiel ein sehr sozialer Teil des Webs – das heißt, wenn da jemand unter seinem Namen aktiv ist, dann ist das in der Regel seins und bleibt auch seins – weil das von der Ausrichtung eher in die private Richtung geht“, sagt Terhaag. Doch es kommt auf den Einzelfall an. Wenn jemand mit seinem Namen in Verbindung mit der Marke und im Auftrag des Unternehmens im sozialen Netzwerk aktiv ist, gehöre der Account vermutlich dem Unternehmen.

Bei Twitter ist recht einfach zu entscheiden, wem Account und Follower gehören: Wird beispielsweise im Namen eines Unternehmens mit einem Account wie „Geschäftsleitung“ getwittert, kann der entsprechende Twitter-Nutzer den Account nur so lange nutzen, wie er die entsprechende Funktion auch ausübt. „Wenn Herr Ratzinger hingegen seinen Account unter privatem Namen eröffnet hätte, wären ihm die Follower natürlich trotzdem in Scharen zugelaufen, weil er der Papst ist. Aber ich habe überhaupt keinen Zweifel dran, dass er den auch nach seiner Amtszeit weiter nutzen könnte“, sagt Terhaag.

Xing-Kontakte gehören nicht unbedingt nur dem Arbeitnehmer

Im Falle des Business-Netzwerks Xing geht der Anwalt davon aus, dass der Account „sehr personenbezogen ist“ – weshalb er im Zweifel eher dem Arbeitnehmer zugesprochen werden würde als dem Arbeitgeber. „Es ist ja auch von Xing schon so angelegt, dass man seinen Werdegang mit verschiedenen Unternehmen dort hinterlegen kann.“ Möglich sei jedoch, dass sich ein Arbeitgeber bei der Trennung von einem Mitarbeiter ein Auskunftsrecht über alle im Zusammenhang mit seinem Arbeitsverhältnis gewonnen Geschäftskontakte erstreiten kann. „So wie der Arbeitgeber auch Anspruch hätte auf bestimmte geschäftliche E-Mails oder auf andere Datenbanken, die der derjenige in seiner Tätigkeit angelegt hat.“

Grundsätzlich sei so etwas ohne Vereinbarung aber immer etwas schwierig. In der Vereinbarung zwischen Arbeitgeber und Arbeitnehmer kann aber auch nicht alles vereinbart werden – wie immer im deutschen Recht dürfen die Grenzen der Sittenwidrigkeit nicht überschritten werden. Das Recht auf Menschenwürde und Persönlichkeitsrechte können auch per Vertrag nicht aufgegeben werden. So sei es beispielsweise sicher nicht rechtens, wenn ein Arbeitgeber pauschal mit einem Arbeitnehmer vereinbart, dass er sämtliche Accounts in sozialen Netzwerken mit Beendigung des Arbeitsverhältnisses dem Arbeitgeber überlässt – egal ob Facebook, Twitter oder andere Netzwerke. „Das wäre sicherlich eine Regelung, die der Rechtsüberprüfung nicht standhalten würde“, sagt Teerhag. „Was Sie für Kontakte privater Natur geknüpft, in der Zeit, in der Sie für ein Unternehmen gearbeitet haben, geht den Arbeitgeber unter keinen Umständen etwas an.“

E-Mail-Rechtsprechung als Vorbild

Die Rechtsprechung würde sich hier vermutlich an den Urteilen orientieren, die es bereits für den Bereich E-Mails gibt. Hier gilt: Ein Arbeitgeber hat das Recht, in geschäftliche E-Mails Einblick zu nehmen. Sobald er jedoch bemerkt, dass eine E-Mail privaten Charakter hat, ist er verpflichtet, das Lesen sofort abzubrechen.

Übrigens darf der Arbeitgeber in der Regel einem Arbeitnehmer auch kein Twitter- oder Facebook-Verbot erteilen – zumindest nicht in der Freizeit. Allerdings muss auch hier nach der Position im Unternehmen differenziert werden. „Es ist sicherlich für die Telekom eher möglich, ihrem Geschäftsführer zu sagen, dass er keine Fotos auf Facebook einstellen kann, auf denen er besoffen auf der Weihnachtsfeier tanzt, als es bei einem normalen Mitarbeiter wäre“, sagt Terhaag. „Grundsätzlich kann der Arbeitgeber es aber nicht verbieten – außer in der Arbeitszeit des Mitarbeiters“, führt der Anwalt aus. „Er darf mir ja auch nicht vorschreiben, ob ich in meiner Freizeit jetzt eine gestreifte Hose anziehe. Die Grenzen der Weisungsbefugnisse enden bei der Privatsphäre – und jeder hat ein Privatleben.“

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Kommentare (1 aus 1)

Alle Kommentare »
    • Was spricht den dagegen das man den Account "kopiert" einmal für den Arbeitnehmer und einmal für den Arbeitgeber und die Follower beiden Accounts folgen?

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Four Men to Face Charges Over Migrant Deaths

A Hungarian court said four men could face up to 16 years in prison for alleged people trafficking in connection with the deaths of 71 migrants found in an abandoned truck.

Turkey Bombs Islamic State Targets in Syria as Part of U.S.-Led Coalition

Turkish jets bombed Islamic State targets in Syria under the umbrella of the U.S.-led international coalition for the first time, the country’s government said, as Turkey expands its fight against the extremist group.

Egyptian Court Sentences Al Jazeera Journalists

An Egyptian judge sentenced a trio of Al Jazeera English journalists to three years in prison, prompting fresh criticism of the government’s clampdown on press and political freedoms.

Thousands March Against Lebanon Government

A demonstration in Beirut against poor waste management blossomed into full-throated demands that Lebanon’s long-standing political class step down from power.

Stock Swings Don’t Shake Investors

Stock indexes’ wildest week in years rattled investors and fueled expectations for further price swings, but it failed to squelch the belief U.S. markets remain the best place to put money. 58

Fed’s Fischer: ‘Good Reason’ to Think U.S. Inflation Will Move Higher

The Fed‘s Stanley Fischer said there is “good reason” to think sluggish U.S. inflation will firm and move back toward the U.S. central bank’s 2% annual target, touching on a significant assessment facing the Fed ahead of its September policy meeting. 67

New Orleans Honors Katrina’s Victims on Anniversary

A city known for its resilience marked the 10th anniversary of one of the worst natural disasters ever to hit the United States on Saturday, beginning with a somber ceremony at a memorial to Hurricane Katrina’s victims.

France, Germany Warn Putin on Ukraine Separatist Elections

Leaders of France and Germany told Russian President Vladimir Putin that rebel-run elections conducted in the separatist-controlled regions of Ukraine would endanger the so-called Minsk peace process.

Rice to Press Pakistan on Antiterror Vigilance

National security adviser Susan Rice is set to arrive in Pakistan on Sunday to press the country’s government to do more to prevent terrorists from using its territory as a base for attacks on neighboring states.

Treading Line Between War and Peace, U.S. Special Forces Groom Afghan Troops

The U.S. military allowed The Wall Street Journal to visit a variety of commando units, offering a glimpse into what may be the last fighting season of America’s longest war. 70

Foreign Man Arrested in Bangkok Blast Probe

Thai police said they arrested a foreign man whom they described as a suspect in this month’s deadly bombing of a Bangkok shrine that is popular with Chinese tourists.

Thousands Protest Against Malaysia’s Najib Razak

Police said an estimated 25,000 people demonstrated in the capital, protesting management of the economy and debt problems at a state investment fund.

Buying the Dips Doesn’t Work for Everyone

The old strategy of buying the dips may not work for everyone. In fact, for some people, it could be disastrous, writes Jason Zweig.

How Do You Short China?

Traders are scouring stock, bond and currency markets for ways to make money on the malaise afflicting China. Some are piling into insurance-like contracts that would pay out if the country defaulted on a small pool of its foreign-denominated bonds.

Myanmar Buzz Fades for Many U.S. Investors

Disenchantment with the business climate, especially among American companies, comes as concerns are spreading about Myanmar’s political future.

A ‘Black Swan’ Fund Made $1 Billion This Week

Universa Hedge Fund, a well-known ‘black swan’ fund, made more than $1 billion in profits in one week amid volatility. 53

Inmarsat Says Russian Proton Rocket Puts Satellite Into Orbit

Inmarsat declared the launch of a Russian Proton rocket carrying one of its satellites a success after the rocket delivered its cargo into its initial orbit position.

China’s Moves Won’t Help U.S. Tech Firms

China’s moves to spur its slowing economy are having an important but less obvious effect on the tech sector: Strengthening local companies that already were making life difficult for U.S. rivals.

European Refiners’ Profit Revival Faces End

Europe’s biggest energy companies have enjoyed a revival of refinery profits, but that run may be winding down even as oil prices slump.

Syngenta Shareholders Not Happy

Some Syngenta shareholders are angry about the pesticide-and-seed giant’s rejection of takeover proposals from rival Monsanto, which abandoned its pursuit this week.

U.S.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R., Tenn.), right, listens to Sen. John Barrasso (R., Wyo.) last month in Washington, D.C.

Foes Try New Ways To Attack Iran Deal

Congressional opponents of the Iranian nuclear accord are devising a Plan B as President Obama moves closer to locking up the support needed to implement the deal. 662

Book Reviews

Stieg Larsson’s Heroine Lives Again

David Lagercrantz’s “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” revives Lisbeth Salander in fitting style.

World War II’s Greatest Escape

Allied prisoners broke out of a German camp using ladders inspired by medieval siege tools.

Video

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

Buzz Aldrin Developing Plan to Colonize Mars

1:09