The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Austria Struggles to Identify Migrants’ Bodies

Veteran police investigators say they have never faced a task like identifying the 71 bodies of would-be refugees unloaded from the back of a truck found abandoned along a highway last week.

5 Points to Watch in the ECB’s September Meeting

Is it time to take the European Central Bank’s stimulus off cruise control? This is the key question heading into Thursday's policy meeting. Here are five things to watch during ECB President Mario Draghi's press conference.

Global Markets Bounce Back

Global markets were broadly higher ahead of the European Central Bank’s regular monetary policy meeting and a closely watched jobs report out of the U.S. later in the week.

China to Slim Down Military

At a military parade marking 70 years since Japan’s defeat in World War II, President Xi Jinping announced that China’s armed forces will reduce the number of troops by 300,000.

Europe File

Tsipras Moves Greece Past Austerity Debate

Greeks can now have a conventional political debate on the choices needed to hit its bailout targets.

Inside Uber’s Fight With Its Chinese Nemesis

China’s multibillion-dollar ride-hailing market has erupted into a brawl between Uber and Beijing startup Didi Kuaidi.

Apple’s Latest Challenge: Topping Its Own Success

Apple’s iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus reignited sales growth for the smartphone. But analysts predict muted growth for its latest models due out next week.

Sweden Leaves Interest Rate Unchanged

Sweden’s central bank has left its main interest rate and bond-buying program unchanged, saying its existing policies were supporting the economy and would lead to inflation moving closer to its 2% target.

Devaluation Strengthens China’s Hand at IMF

Beijing’s careful management of its currency since its devaluation last month is bolstering China’s bid to get the yuan included in the IMF’s basket of reserve currencies as soon as November.

Rio Tinto Sees Solid Demand for Steel

Rio Tinto told investors it expects world-wide demand for iron ore to keep growing despite China’s economic slowdown, as the company projected a rising appetite for steel.

Private-Equity Firms Explore Bids for Petco

Private-equity firms are examining a possible purchase of Petco Holdings, the pet-store chain that filed to go public last month.

Barclays Sells Portuguese Retail-Banking Business

Barclays PLC has sold its Portuguese retail banking business to Spain’s Bankinter SA, as the British bank scales back its presence in less profitable markets.

Foreign Firms Feel China’s Chill

Market turmoil and Beijing’s crackdown on brokers and investors is complicating the plans of foreign funds and investment banks that had bet on bigger business in China.

Syngenta Moves to Calm Disappointed Shareholders

Syngenta moved to appease shareholders angered by its rejection of a takeover from Monsanto, saying it will divest its global vegetables seeds business and return more than $2 billion to shareholders.

Vivendi Earnings Rise

Vivendi SA on Wednesday reported a rise in second-quarter net profit, boosted by a windfall from the sale of its Brazilian telecom unit GVT to Telefónica SA.

Small Firms Slow to Embrace Chip-Card System

Many small businesses aren’t racing to update their checkout systems ahead of an Oct. 1 shift that will put merchants on the hook for some fraudulent card charges.

Obama Locks in Votes to Secure Iran Nuclear Deal

President Barack Obama locked in enough support in Congress to ensure he can overcome bipartisan opposition and implement a landmark nuclear accord with Iran. 1817

World Tree Count Climbs

There are slightly more than three trillion trees in the world, a figure that dwarfs previous estimates, according to the most comprehensive census yet of global forestation. 172

Gas Discovery in Egypt Troubles Israel

Israeli officials have expressed concern that the discovery of an extensive gas field off the coast of Egypt could upend Israeli development of its energy resources.

Masked Gunmen Kidnap 18 Turkish Workers in Baghdad

Identities of the gunmen in an early-morning raid on a sports stadium weren’t immediately known, as Turks in Iraq were seized for a second time in the past year.

At Least 22 Killed in Suicide Bombings at Mosque in Yemen

A pair of suicide bombings killed a least 22 people Wednesday at a mosque in San’a, just hours after a gunman killed two Red Cross workers.

Solitary Confinement Poses ‘Grave Problem,’ Study Says

Prisons are holding as many as 100,000 inmates in solitary confinement, a striking figure that poses a “grave problem” for the criminal justice system, according to a study. 56

Emails Point to Large Role for Clinton Adviser Blumenthal

Longtime aide Sidney Blumenthal maintained an outsize role with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, despite being blocked from taking a job at the department. 189

Court Weighs Request to Immediately Stop Phone-Data Collection

An appeals court panel is considering whether to allow the government to continue the bulk collection of phone records during a six-month transition period until a new law kicks in prohibiting the controversial program.

Biden’s Florida Trip Draws Campaign-Level Attention

Vice President Joe Biden received full-court national attention for an otherwise routine visit to Miami Dade College, with dozens of television cameras, photographers and reporters there to cover his 30 minutes of remarks.

Video

Hungarian Police Struggle to Control Migrants

2:02

The Iran Nuclear Deal Explained

3:34

Uber Class-Action Lawsuit: What's at Stake

2:39

20 Odd Questions

Manolo Blahnik on Old Films and Kate Moss

The shoe designer on what he’d blow his money on, the drama behind Kate Moss’s wedding shoes and exactly how he feels about fake Manolos.

A Modigliani Painting for $100 Million?

Christie’s International said it expects to ask roughly $100 million for a Modigliani nude that will be auctioned this fall, a bold reflection of how prices for blue-chip paintings have skyrocketed in recent seasons.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Wem gehören die Follower des Papstes?

Screenshot

Nicht einmal der Vatikan weiß, was mit den Followern des Papstes nach seinem Rücktritt passiert – eine entsprechende Anfrage von WSJ Tech konnte die katholische Kirche nicht beantworten. Dabei dürfte die Sache rechtlich ziemlich eindeutig sein: Die Follower des Papst-Accounts auf Twitter – allein für den englischsprachigen Account sind es mehr als 1,5 Millionen – würden bei einer natürlich völlig theoretischen rechtlichen Auseinandersetzung wohl klar dem Vatikan zugesprochen werden. Denn Josef Ratziger twitterte klar in seiner Funktion als Papst – dafür spricht alleine schon der Name seines Twitter-Accounts: Pontifex.

Wenn Mitarbeiter twittern

Die Frage ist nicht nur theoretischer Natur – zumindest, wenn sie nicht im Zusammenhang mit dem Papst gestellt wird. Der Düsseldorfer Fachanwalt für IT-Recht Michael Terhaag berichtet von einem Fall, in dem sich ein Mitarbeiter mit seinem ehemaligen Arbeitgeber um das Eigentumsrecht von Kontakten aus dem Business-Netzwerk Xing streitet. Der Fall ist noch nicht entschieden. „Sinnvoll ist es in jedem Unternehmen, diese Frage mit dem Arbeitnehmer verbindlich zu regeln“, sagt Terhaag. Vieles sei hier gesetzlich noch nicht geregelt und falle damit in einen Graubereich. „Man sollte an den Arbeitsvertrag angeheftet kurz klären, was der Arbeitnehmer im Social Web schreiben darf, was er unter eigenem Namen machen darf und so weiter“, führt Terhaag aus.

Aber auch ohne diese Regelung gibt es Fälle, die nach Auffassung des Anwalts eindeutig sind. „Wenn wir mal spaßeshalber beim Papst bleiben – da ist es natürlich so, dass der Account dem Amt zugeordnet ist“, erläutert er. Ähnliche klare Fälle wären beispielsweise Accounts wie „Bundeskanzler“ oder „Bundeskanzlerin“, die es allerdings nicht gibt.

Facebook hat privaten Charakter

Es kommt dabei aber auch auf die Plattform an, auf der der Mitarbeiter aktiv ist. „Facebook ist zum Beispiel ein sehr sozialer Teil des Webs – das heißt, wenn da jemand unter seinem Namen aktiv ist, dann ist das in der Regel seins und bleibt auch seins – weil das von der Ausrichtung eher in die private Richtung geht“, sagt Terhaag. Doch es kommt auf den Einzelfall an. Wenn jemand mit seinem Namen in Verbindung mit der Marke und im Auftrag des Unternehmens im sozialen Netzwerk aktiv ist, gehöre der Account vermutlich dem Unternehmen.

Bei Twitter ist recht einfach zu entscheiden, wem Account und Follower gehören: Wird beispielsweise im Namen eines Unternehmens mit einem Account wie „Geschäftsleitung“ getwittert, kann der entsprechende Twitter-Nutzer den Account nur so lange nutzen, wie er die entsprechende Funktion auch ausübt. „Wenn Herr Ratzinger hingegen seinen Account unter privatem Namen eröffnet hätte, wären ihm die Follower natürlich trotzdem in Scharen zugelaufen, weil er der Papst ist. Aber ich habe überhaupt keinen Zweifel dran, dass er den auch nach seiner Amtszeit weiter nutzen könnte“, sagt Terhaag.

Xing-Kontakte gehören nicht unbedingt nur dem Arbeitnehmer

Im Falle des Business-Netzwerks Xing geht der Anwalt davon aus, dass der Account „sehr personenbezogen ist“ – weshalb er im Zweifel eher dem Arbeitnehmer zugesprochen werden würde als dem Arbeitgeber. „Es ist ja auch von Xing schon so angelegt, dass man seinen Werdegang mit verschiedenen Unternehmen dort hinterlegen kann.“ Möglich sei jedoch, dass sich ein Arbeitgeber bei der Trennung von einem Mitarbeiter ein Auskunftsrecht über alle im Zusammenhang mit seinem Arbeitsverhältnis gewonnen Geschäftskontakte erstreiten kann. „So wie der Arbeitgeber auch Anspruch hätte auf bestimmte geschäftliche E-Mails oder auf andere Datenbanken, die der derjenige in seiner Tätigkeit angelegt hat.“

Grundsätzlich sei so etwas ohne Vereinbarung aber immer etwas schwierig. In der Vereinbarung zwischen Arbeitgeber und Arbeitnehmer kann aber auch nicht alles vereinbart werden – wie immer im deutschen Recht dürfen die Grenzen der Sittenwidrigkeit nicht überschritten werden. Das Recht auf Menschenwürde und Persönlichkeitsrechte können auch per Vertrag nicht aufgegeben werden. So sei es beispielsweise sicher nicht rechtens, wenn ein Arbeitgeber pauschal mit einem Arbeitnehmer vereinbart, dass er sämtliche Accounts in sozialen Netzwerken mit Beendigung des Arbeitsverhältnisses dem Arbeitgeber überlässt – egal ob Facebook, Twitter oder andere Netzwerke. „Das wäre sicherlich eine Regelung, die der Rechtsüberprüfung nicht standhalten würde“, sagt Teerhag. „Was Sie für Kontakte privater Natur geknüpft, in der Zeit, in der Sie für ein Unternehmen gearbeitet haben, geht den Arbeitgeber unter keinen Umständen etwas an.“

E-Mail-Rechtsprechung als Vorbild

Die Rechtsprechung würde sich hier vermutlich an den Urteilen orientieren, die es bereits für den Bereich E-Mails gibt. Hier gilt: Ein Arbeitgeber hat das Recht, in geschäftliche E-Mails Einblick zu nehmen. Sobald er jedoch bemerkt, dass eine E-Mail privaten Charakter hat, ist er verpflichtet, das Lesen sofort abzubrechen.

Übrigens darf der Arbeitgeber in der Regel einem Arbeitnehmer auch kein Twitter- oder Facebook-Verbot erteilen – zumindest nicht in der Freizeit. Allerdings muss auch hier nach der Position im Unternehmen differenziert werden. „Es ist sicherlich für die Telekom eher möglich, ihrem Geschäftsführer zu sagen, dass er keine Fotos auf Facebook einstellen kann, auf denen er besoffen auf der Weihnachtsfeier tanzt, als es bei einem normalen Mitarbeiter wäre“, sagt Terhaag. „Grundsätzlich kann der Arbeitgeber es aber nicht verbieten – außer in der Arbeitszeit des Mitarbeiters“, führt der Anwalt aus. „Er darf mir ja auch nicht vorschreiben, ob ich in meiner Freizeit jetzt eine gestreifte Hose anziehe. Die Grenzen der Weisungsbefugnisse enden bei der Privatsphäre – und jeder hat ein Privatleben.“

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Kommentare (1 aus 1)

Alle Kommentare »
    • Was spricht den dagegen das man den Account "kopiert" einmal für den Arbeitnehmer und einmal für den Arbeitgeber und die Follower beiden Accounts folgen?

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Austria Struggles to Identify Migrants’ Bodies

Veteran police investigators say they have never faced a task like identifying the 71 bodies of would-be refugees unloaded from the back of a truck found abandoned along a highway last week.

5 Points to Watch in the ECB’s September Meeting

Is it time to take the European Central Bank’s stimulus off cruise control? This is the key question heading into Thursday's policy meeting. Here are five things to watch during ECB President Mario Draghi's press conference.

Global Markets Bounce Back

Global markets were broadly higher ahead of the European Central Bank’s regular monetary policy meeting and a closely watched jobs report out of the U.S. later in the week.

Europe File

Tsipras Moves Greece Past Austerity Debate

Greeks can now have a conventional political debate on the choices needed to hit its bailout targets.

Inside Uber’s Fight With Its Chinese Nemesis

China’s multibillion-dollar ride-hailing market has erupted into a brawl between Uber and Beijing startup Didi Kuaidi.

China to Slim Down Military

At a military parade marking 70 years since Japan’s defeat in World War II, President Xi Jinping announced that China’s armed forces will reduce the number of troops by 300,000.

Apple’s Latest Challenge: Topping Its Own Success

Apple’s iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus reignited sales growth for the smartphone. But analysts predict muted growth for its latest models due out next week.

Syngenta Moves to Calm Disappointed Shareholders

Syngenta moved to appease shareholders angered by its rejection of a takeover from Monsanto, saying it will divest its global vegetables seeds business and return more than $2 billion to shareholders.

Vivendi Earnings Rise

Vivendi SA on Wednesday reported a rise in second-quarter net profit, boosted by a windfall from the sale of its Brazilian telecom unit GVT to Telefónica SA.

Small Firms Slow to Embrace Chip-Card System

Many small businesses aren’t racing to update their checkout systems ahead of an Oct. 1 shift that will put merchants on the hook for some fraudulent card charges.

Shell, Exxon Must Pay Groningen Quake Compensation

A Dutch court ruled that Royal Dutch Shell and Exxon Mobil must compensate homeowners for a drop in house prices caused by earthquakes linked to production at the Groningen gas field.

Sony Pictures Settles Data Breach Lawsuit

The lawsuit, filed by former Sony employees in federal court, accused the company of failing to protect their data, especially in light of previous breaches of Sony’s servers.

Sweden Leaves Interest Rate Unchanged

Sweden’s central bank has left its main interest rate and bond-buying program unchanged, saying its existing policies were supporting the economy and would lead to inflation moving closer to its 2% target.

Devaluation Strengthens China’s Hand at IMF

Beijing’s careful management of its currency since its devaluation last month is bolstering China’s bid to get the yuan included in the IMF’s basket of reserve currencies as soon as November.

Private-Equity Firms Explore Bids for Petco

Private-equity firms are examining a possible purchase of Petco Holdings, the pet-store chain that filed to go public last month.

Barclays Sells Portuguese Retail-Banking Business

Barclays PLC has sold its Portuguese retail banking business to Spain’s Bankinter SA, as the British bank scales back its presence in less profitable markets.

Obama Locks in Votes to Secure Iran Nuclear Deal

President Barack Obama locked in enough support in Congress to ensure he can overcome bipartisan opposition and implement a landmark nuclear accord with Iran. 1817

World Tree Count Climbs

There are slightly more than three trillion trees in the world, a figure that dwarfs previous estimates, according to the most comprehensive census yet of global forestation. 172

Gas Discovery in Egypt Troubles Israel

Israeli officials have expressed concern that the discovery of an extensive gas field off the coast of Egypt could upend Israeli development of its energy resources.

Masked Gunmen Kidnap 18 Turkish Workers in Baghdad

Identities of the gunmen in an early-morning raid on a sports stadium weren’t immediately known, as Turks in Iraq were seized for a second time in the past year.

At Least 22 Killed in Suicide Bombings at Mosque in Yemen

A pair of suicide bombings killed a least 22 people Wednesday at a mosque in San’a, just hours after a gunman killed two Red Cross workers.

Solitary Confinement Poses ‘Grave Problem,’ Study Says

Prisons are holding as many as 100,000 inmates in solitary confinement, a striking figure that poses a “grave problem” for the criminal justice system, according to a study. 56

Emails Point to Large Role for Clinton Adviser Blumenthal

Longtime aide Sidney Blumenthal maintained an outsize role with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, despite being blocked from taking a job at the department. 189

Court Weighs Request to Immediately Stop Phone-Data Collection

An appeals court panel is considering whether to allow the government to continue the bulk collection of phone records during a six-month transition period until a new law kicks in prohibiting the controversial program.

Biden’s Florida Trip Draws Campaign-Level Attention

Vice President Joe Biden received full-court national attention for an otherwise routine visit to Miami Dade College, with dozens of television cameras, photographers and reporters there to cover his 30 minutes of remarks.

Video

Hungarian Police Struggle to Control Migrants

2:02

The Iran Nuclear Deal Explained

3:34

Uber Class-Action Lawsuit: What's at Stake

2:39