The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Migrant Crackdown Sows Chaos in Europe

German Chancellor Angela Merkel called on Europe to tackle the migrant crisis and agree on a fair distribution of people, warning that failing to do so might put the EU’s open-border policy at risk.

Oil Surges as Supply Estimates Shrink

Oil prices soared Monday, marking their strongest three-day rally since Iraq’s 1990 invasion of Kuwait, on doubts the global glut of crude would be as long-lasting as many investors and traders had earlier believed. 50

Large Blast Reported in Chinese City

An explosion ripped through an industrial zone in northeastern China just two weeks after a chemical blast killed more than 150 people and raised concerns about industrial safety in China.

Islamic State Blows Up Palmyra Ruins

Islamic State has partially destroyed Palmyra’s 2,000-year-old Temple of Bel in a massive explosion, the latest in a series of attacks by the militants on the Syrian city’s famed historic sites. 170

Russia Puts Off Data Showdown With Technology Firms

Facebook, Google and Twitter are among the U.S. companies that are getting more time to comply with a new law requiring Russian data centers.

Ukrainian National Guard Officer Killed, Dozens Injured in Protest Blast

One member of Ukraine’s National Guard was killed and at least 69 others were injured outside the country’s parliament, as fighting broke out between protesters and law-enforcement officers.

Nuclear-Energy Official Pleads Guilty in Russian Uranium Sales Bribery Case

A Russian nuclear-energy official pleaded guilty Monday in U.S. federal court to conspiracy to commit money laundering for arranging more than $2 million in bribes to help U.S. companies do business with the Russian state-owned nuclear-energy corporation.

Startups Put Data in Farmers’ Hands

Farmers and startups like Farmobile and Granular are starting to compete with agribusiness giants over the newest commodity being harvested on U.S. farms: data.

Patent-Law Change Would Raise Medical Costs

A patent law change pushed by the pharmaceutical industry could cost federal health-care programs $1.3 billion over a decade by delaying new generic drugs, the Congressional Budget Office estimates.

Samsung Takes Smartwatch Fight to Apple

Samsung plans to unveil a new smartwatch, as the company attempts to prove that it can outshine Apple on design in a nascent product category.

StubHub Gets Out of ‘All-In’ Pricing

Nearly two years after shifting to “all-in” pricing, ticket-resale giant StubHub is reversing course and returning to its old system of adding 15% to 17% at the last minute.

Nomura Wrongfully Dismissed U.S. Executive, Tokyo Court Finds

Japan’s largest brokerage wrongfully dismissed an American managing director during a dispute over compensation for a product he invented, the Tokyo District Court ruled.

Dollar Slumped Against Euro, Yen in August

The dollar retreated against the euro and the yen in August as rising concerns over global growth and inflation moved investors to push back expectations for higher U.S. interest rates and exit from some of their large consensus trades.

David Einhorn’s Greenlight Takes a Beating in August

The firm told investors it lost 5.3% in August as the value of its major holdings declined, said people familiar with the matter, widening its loss for the year to 13.8%.

Service Providers See Gold in Shares of Startups

Branding firm Red Antler is among vendors that are looking to profit on the soaring valuations of young startups by taking payment in stock instead of cash.

Sports

At the U.S. Open, Djokovic Struggles to Close

Novak Djokovic—the best and most consistent tennis player in the world for five years now—has only won U.S. Open one time in his career.

World

China ‘Punishes’ Nearly 200 People for Spreading Rumors

Sweep targets people who the government said spread false Internet rumors regarding the stock-market turmoil and deadly blasts in Tianjin. 66

Turkey Arrests Vice News Journalists

A Turkish court ordered the formal arrest of three Vice News journalists on terrorism-related charges, days after detaining the foreign nationals as they covered a mounting Kurdish insurgency in the country.

Blue Bell Ice Cream Returns to Store Shelves

Cartons of Blue Bell ice cream began reappearing in grocery stores in cities Monday, a major step after the ice-cream maker yanked all its products following a deadly listeria outbreak and faced a financial crisis.

Suppliers Feel Pain as Coal Miners Struggle

As big coal miners struggle, their equipment suppliers—thousands of businesses sprinkled throughout Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky—are scrambling to find new customers anywhere they can. 129

Eni Reports Huge Natural-Gas Discovery off Egypt

Eni SpA said it made a massive natural-gas discovery off the coast of Egypt in what the Italian oil-and-gas company is calling the largest ever find in the Mediterranean Sea.

U.K. Approves Giant North Sea Gas Project

A.P. Møller-Maersk A/S said it has received approval to develop the $4.5 billion Culzean gas field, the largest new find in the U.K. North Sea for a decade.

Video

Ukraine Protest Blast Kills Officer, Injures Dozens

0:45

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

What to Watch for After Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is afflicting more people, and research shows patients who have had non-melanoma skin cancers are at increased risk of recurrence.

IMAGE 1 of 12

Video Music Awards 2015

Kanye West gave a long rant at the MTV Video Music Awards as he apologized to Taylor Swift for taking her microphone in 2009. Swift presented West with the Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award. Earlier, she and Nicki Minaj buried their beef by joining forces onstage.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Apple spendiert seinen MacBooks ein Update und senkt die Preise

Apple hat vor wenigen Minuten bekanntgegeben, die Preise für seine MacBook-Reihe zum Teil deutlich zu senken. Gleichzeitig spendierte das US-Unternehmen den Notebooks schnellere Prozessoren. Das MacBook Pro mit 13 Zoll-Retina-Display gibt es mit 128 Gigabyte Speicher ab sofort für 1.499 Euro. Mit schnellerem 2,6 GHz-Prozessor und 256 Gigabyte Speicherplatz kostet es 1.699 Euro. Das ist ein Nachlass von 250 bzw. 350 Euro.

Beim größeren Modell, dem MacBook Pro mit 15 Zoll-Retina-Display sind die Preise ebenfalls gefallen. Das Modell mit neuem 2,4 GHz Quad-Core-Processor kostet jetzt 2.199 Euro. Das größere Modell mit neuem 2,7 GHz Quad-Core-Prozessor und 16 Gigabyte Arbeitsspeicher wird für 2.799 Euro ausgeliefert – ein Unterschied von 80 bzw. 100 Euro.

Auch beim MacBook Air wurde an der Preisschraube gedreht. Mit 13 Zoll-Bildschirm und 256 Gigabyte Speicher werden ab sofort 1.399 Euro fällig – das sind 150 Euro weniger als zuvor.

Auch die Preise der anderen Modelle wurden im deutschen Online-Store von Apple leicht gesenkt. Bei den MacBooks ohne Retina-Display liegen sie nun zwischen 50 und 80 Euro unter dem vorherigen Preis. Die kleineren MacBook-Air-Varianten gibt es alle 50 Euro billiger.

Alle Geräte sollen ab sofort in den Apple Stores und im Online Store des Unternehmenserhältlich sein.

Kommentar abgeben

Wir begrüßen gut durchdachte Kommentare von Lesern. Bitte beachten Sie unsere Richtlinien.

Kommentare (3 aus 3)

Alle Kommentare »
    • bei dem USD-Kurs ist das immer noch eine Preiserhöhung im Vergleich zu Februar 2012!

    • Nur konsequent - seit die Aktie selbst 34% billiger geworden ist

    • Und es dürfte noch ein bisschen günstiger werden.

Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Migrant Crackdown Sows Chaos in Europe

German Chancellor Angela Merkel called on Europe to tackle the migrant crisis and agree on a fair distribution of people, warning that failing to do so might put the EU’s open-border policy at risk.

Oil Surges as Supply Estimates Shrink

Oil prices soared Monday, marking their strongest three-day rally since Iraq’s 1990 invasion of Kuwait, on doubts the global glut of crude would be as long-lasting as many investors and traders had earlier believed. 50

Large Blast Reported in Chinese City

An explosion ripped through an industrial zone in northeastern China just two weeks after a chemical blast killed more than 150 people and raised concerns about industrial safety in China.

Islamic State Blows Up Palmyra Ruins

Islamic State has partially destroyed Palmyra’s 2,000-year-old Temple of Bel in a massive explosion, the latest in a series of attacks by the militants on the Syrian city’s famed historic sites. 170

Russia Puts Off Data Showdown With Technology Firms

Facebook, Google and Twitter are among the U.S. companies that are getting more time to comply with a new law requiring Russian data centers.

Ukrainian National Guard Officer Killed, Dozens Injured in Protest Blast

One member of Ukraine’s National Guard was killed and at least 69 others were injured outside the country’s parliament, as fighting broke out between protesters and law-enforcement officers.

Nuclear-Energy Official Pleads Guilty in Russian Uranium Sales Bribery Case

A Russian nuclear-energy official pleaded guilty Monday in U.S. federal court to conspiracy to commit money laundering for arranging more than $2 million in bribes to help U.S. companies do business with the Russian state-owned nuclear-energy corporation.

Startups Put Data in Farmers’ Hands

Farmers and startups like Farmobile and Granular are starting to compete with agribusiness giants over the newest commodity being harvested on U.S. farms: data.

Patent-Law Change Would Raise Medical Costs

A patent law change pushed by the pharmaceutical industry could cost federal health-care programs $1.3 billion over a decade by delaying new generic drugs, the Congressional Budget Office estimates.

Samsung Takes Smartwatch Fight to Apple

Samsung plans to unveil a new smartwatch, as the company attempts to prove that it can outshine Apple on design in a nascent product category.

StubHub Gets Out of ‘All-In’ Pricing

Nearly two years after shifting to “all-in” pricing, ticket-resale giant StubHub is reversing course and returning to its old system of adding 15% to 17% at the last minute.

Nomura Wrongfully Dismissed U.S. Executive, Tokyo Court Finds

Japan’s largest brokerage wrongfully dismissed an American managing director during a dispute over compensation for a product he invented, the Tokyo District Court ruled.

Dollar Slumped Against Euro, Yen in August

The dollar retreated against the euro and the yen in August as rising concerns over global growth and inflation moved investors to push back expectations for higher U.S. interest rates and exit from some of their large consensus trades.

David Einhorn’s Greenlight Takes a Beating in August

The firm told investors it lost 5.3% in August as the value of its major holdings declined, said people familiar with the matter, widening its loss for the year to 13.8%.

Service Providers See Gold in Shares of Startups

Branding firm Red Antler is among vendors that are looking to profit on the soaring valuations of young startups by taking payment in stock instead of cash.

Sports

At the U.S. Open, Djokovic Struggles to Close

Novak Djokovic—the best and most consistent tennis player in the world for five years now—has only won U.S. Open one time in his career.

World

China ‘Punishes’ Nearly 200 People for Spreading Rumors

Sweep targets people who the government said spread false Internet rumors regarding the stock-market turmoil and deadly blasts in Tianjin. 66

Turkey Arrests Vice News Journalists

A Turkish court ordered the formal arrest of three Vice News journalists on terrorism-related charges, days after detaining the foreign nationals as they covered a mounting Kurdish insurgency in the country.

Blue Bell Ice Cream Returns to Store Shelves

Cartons of Blue Bell ice cream began reappearing in grocery stores in cities Monday, a major step after the ice-cream maker yanked all its products following a deadly listeria outbreak and faced a financial crisis.

Suppliers Feel Pain as Coal Miners Struggle

As big coal miners struggle, their equipment suppliers—thousands of businesses sprinkled throughout Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky—are scrambling to find new customers anywhere they can. 129

Eni Reports Huge Natural-Gas Discovery off Egypt

Eni SpA said it made a massive natural-gas discovery off the coast of Egypt in what the Italian oil-and-gas company is calling the largest ever find in the Mediterranean Sea.

U.K. Approves Giant North Sea Gas Project

A.P. Møller-Maersk A/S said it has received approval to develop the $4.5 billion Culzean gas field, the largest new find in the U.K. North Sea for a decade.

Video

Ukraine Protest Blast Kills Officer, Injures Dozens

0:45

Body Count Rises in Migrant Effort to Reach Europe

1:38

Lebanese ‘Stink’ Protest Turns Toward Politicians

2:11

What to Watch for After Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is afflicting more people, and research shows patients who have had non-melanoma skin cancers are at increased risk of recurrence.