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Syrians Take Arctic Route to Europe

More than 150 refugees have entered Norway from Arctic Russia this year—a fraction of the estimated half-million people who have sought asylum in Europe, but the flow is quickening as Syrians share the tip for a cheaper and safer route.

Migrants Storm Train Station in Hungary

Hundreds of migrants rushed trains at Hungary’s main international station as the country’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban blamed Germany for Europe’s migration crisis and warned that border-free travel within the bloc is at risk.

5 Things to Watch at the ECB’s September Meeting

Is it time to take the European Central Bank’s stimulus off cruise control? This is the key question heading into Thursday’s policy meeting.

Global Markets Bounce Back

Stocks around the world extended gains as investors looked for signals of how central banks will contend with upheaval in financial markets.

China to Slim Down Military

Xi Jinping announced a reduction of 300,000 troops to China’s armed forces, part of a series of reforms to strengthen a military striving to assert increasingly global interests.

Europe File

Tsipras Moves Greece Past Austerity Debate

Greeks can now have a conventional political debate on the choices needed to hit its bailout targets.

Inside Uber’s Fight With Its Chinese Nemesis

China’s multibillion-dollar ride-hailing market has erupted into a brawl between Uber and Beijing startup Didi Kuaidi.

Foreign Firms Feel China’s Chill

Market turmoil and Beijing’s crackdown on brokers and investors is complicating the plans of foreign funds and investment banks that had bet on bigger business in China.

Devaluation Strengthens China’s Hand at IMF

Beijing’s careful management of its currency since its devaluation last month is bolstering China’s bid to get the yuan included in the IMF’s basket of reserve currencies as soon as November.

Rio Tinto Sees Solid Demand for Steel

Rio Tinto told investors it expects world-wide demand for iron ore to keep growing despite China’s economic slowdown, as the company projected a rising appetite for steel.

Private-Equity Firms Explore Bids for Petco

Private-equity firms are examining a possible purchase of Petco Holdings, the pet-store chain that filed to go public last month.

Barclays Sells Portuguese Retail-Banking Business

Barclays PLC has sold its Portuguese retail banking business to Spain’s Bankinter SA, as the British bank scales back its presence in less profitable markets.

Syngenta Moves to Calm Disappointed Shareholders

Syngenta moved to appease shareholders angered by its rejection of a takeover from Monsanto, saying it will divest its global vegetables seeds business and return more than $2 billion to shareholders.

Vivendi Earnings Rise

Vivendi SA on Wednesday reported a rise in second-quarter net profit, boosted by a windfall from the sale of its Brazilian telecom unit GVT to Telefónica SA.

Small Firms Slow to Embrace Chip-Card System

Many small businesses aren’t racing to update their checkout systems ahead of an Oct. 1 shift that will put merchants on the hook for some fraudulent card charges.

Natalie Massenet Leaves Net-a-Porter

The founder and executive chairman of Net-a-Porter has abruptly resigned, leaving the high-end fashion site ahead of its pending merger with Yoox.

World Tree Count Climbs

There are slightly more than three trillion trees in the world, a figure that dwarfs previous estimates, according to the most comprehensive census yet of global forestation. 172

Gas Discovery in Egypt Troubles Israel

Israeli officials have expressed concern that the discovery of an extensive gas field off the coast of Egypt could upend Israeli development of its energy resources.

Masked Gunmen Kidnap 18 Turkish Workers in Baghdad

Identities of the gunmen in an early-morning raid on a sports stadium weren’t immediately known, as Turks in Iraq were seized for a second time in the past year.

At Least 22 Killed in Suicide Bombings at Mosque in Yemen

A pair of suicide bombings killed a least 22 people Wednesday at a mosque in San’a, just hours after a gunman killed two Red Cross workers.

Obama Locks in Votes to Secure Iran Nuclear Deal

President Barack Obama locked in enough support in Congress to ensure he can overcome bipartisan opposition and implement a landmark nuclear accord with Iran. 1817

Solitary Confinement Poses ‘Grave Problem,’ Study Says

Prisons are holding as many as 100,000 inmates in solitary confinement, a striking figure that poses a “grave problem” for the criminal justice system, according to a study. 56

Emails Point to Large Role for Clinton Adviser Blumenthal

Longtime aide Sidney Blumenthal maintained an outsize role with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, despite being blocked from taking a job at the department. 189

Court Weighs Request to Immediately Stop Phone-Data Collection

An appeals court panel is considering whether to allow the government to continue the bulk collection of phone records during a six-month transition period until a new law kicks in prohibiting the controversial program.

Biden’s Florida Trip Draws Campaign-Level Attention

Vice President Joe Biden received full-court national attention for an otherwise routine visit to Miami Dade College, with dozens of television cameras, photographers and reporters there to cover his 30 minutes of remarks.

Video

Hungarian Police Struggle to Control Migrants

2:02

The Iran Nuclear Deal Explained

3:34

Uber Class-Action Lawsuit: What's at Stake

2:39

20 Odd Questions

Manolo Blahnik on Old Films and Kate Moss

The shoe designer on what he’d blow his money on, the drama behind Kate Moss’s wedding shoes and exactly how he feels about fake Manolos.

A Modigliani Painting for $100 Million?

Christie’s International said it expects to ask roughly $100 million for a Modigliani nude that will be auctioned this fall, a bold reflection of how prices for blue-chip paintings have skyrocketed in recent seasons.

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Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Sonys Playstation 4 bleibt ein Geheimnis

Reuters
Das Logo der neuen Playstation. Wie die Konsole jedoch aussieht, weiß noch keiner.

Die Spielkonsole der nächsten Generation ist endlich da. Nur leider kann man sie noch nicht sehen. Wie erwartet hat Sony in der Nacht zu Donnerstag in New York die Playstation 4 vorgestellt, das neueste Gerät in der Welt der Unterhaltungselektronik. Der Vorab-Hype war groß, die Erwartungen auch. Am Ende aber zeigte Sony die neue Konsole gar nicht. Kein Preis, kein Design. Nicht mal ein Erscheinungsdatum wurde genannt. Nur ganz kurz war zum Ende der zweistündigen Präsentation von „Holiday 2013″ die Rede, womit wohl die Weihnachtsferien gemeint sind.

Was Spielefans längst wissen: Die PS4 wird von einem Prozessor mit x86-Architektur von AMD angetrieben, der über acht Kerne verfügt. Insgesamt acht Gigabyte Arbeitsspeicher stehen für CPU und Grafik zur Verfügung. Ein zweiter Chip zur Bearbeitung von Hintergrundprozessen soll die neue Konsole noch schneller machen.

Reuters
Mark Cerny, der Systementwickler der Playstation 4, zeigt den neuen Controller.

Gesteuert wird die Playstation 4 mit dem neuen Dualshock 4 Controller, von dem schon vor der offiziellen Präsentation Bilder im Netz aufgetaucht waren. Die Kontrolleinheit verfügt über ein Touchpad und kann per 3D-Kamera erfasst werden. Neu ist, dass die Spieler nun kleine Ausschnitte aus einem Spiel „ausschneiden” und Freunden als Videoclip über soziale Netzwerke zuschicken können.

Fünf Jahre hat Sony nach eigenen Angaben an der neuen Konsole gearbeitet. Und innovativ ist an dem Gerät, dass Nutzer damit künftig in der Cloud spielen können. Dave Perry, der Mitbegründer und Chef des IT-Dienstleisters Gaikai, sprach während der Präsentation darüber, wie stark Gaikai an der neuen Playstation mitgewirkt hat. Gaikai wurde im vergangenen Jahr von Sony gekauft und hat sich auf Spiele in der Wolke spezialisiert. Käufer der Playstation 4 sollen einige Spiele zunächst ausprobieren können, bevor sie bezahlen müssen.

Ein bisschen enttäuschend: Für die Playstation 3 entwickelte Spiele werden nicht auf der neuen Konsole laufen. Auf sie muss darum über die Wolke zugegriffen werden.

„Das Wohnzimmer ist nicht länger das Zentrum des Playstation-Universums”

Andrew House, Sonys Präsident und Chef der Sparte Sony Computer Entertainment

Sony zeigte während der Präsentation, dass neue Spiele auch auf der mobilen Spielkonsole PS Vita laufen können, die schon Ende  2011 auf den Markt kam. Diese Strategie könnte ein Versuch sein, die nicht gerade berauschenden Verkaufszahlen der Vita anzukurbeln.

Die Branchenlage ist schwierig, die traditionelle Spielindustrie leidet unter rückläufigen Umsatzzahlen. Weil es immer mehr kostenlose Onlinespiele gibt und sich große Hersteller wie Sony, Nintendo und Microsoft mit neuen Produkten viele Jahre Zeit lassen, hinterfragen einige Branchenbeobachter den Sinn und Zweck von Konsolen in der heutigen Zeit.

Sony hat das Vorgängermodell Playstation 3 bis heute mehr als 70 Millionen Mal verkauft. Das Unternehmen spricht von mehr als 110 Millionen Mitgliedern in seinem Playstation-Netzwerk. Allerdings erlitt der Konzern vor zwei Jahren einen großen Rückschlag. Hacker knackten mehr als 77 Millionen Nutzerkonten und der japanische Konzern musste den Dienst vorübergehend abschalten. Der Angriff kostete Sony nach eigenen Angaben 171 Millionen US-Dollar.

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Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search

Syrians Take Arctic Route to Europe

More than 150 refugees have entered Norway from Arctic Russia this year—a fraction of the estimated half-million people who have sought asylum in Europe, but the flow is quickening as Syrians share the tip for a cheaper and safer route.

Migrants Storm Train Station in Hungary

Hundreds of migrants rushed trains at Hungary’s main international station as the country’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban blamed Germany for Europe’s migration crisis and warned that border-free travel within the bloc is at risk.

5 Things to Watch at the ECB’s September Meeting

Is it time to take the European Central Bank’s stimulus off cruise control? This is the key question heading into Thursday’s policy meeting.

Global Markets Bounce Back

Stocks around the world extended gains as investors looked for signals of how central banks will contend with upheaval in financial markets.

China to Slim Down Military

Xi Jinping announced a reduction of 300,000 troops to China’s armed forces, part of a series of reforms to strengthen a military striving to assert increasingly global interests.

Europe File

Tsipras Moves Greece Past Austerity Debate

Greeks can now have a conventional political debate on the choices needed to hit its bailout targets.

Inside Uber’s Fight With Its Chinese Nemesis

China’s multibillion-dollar ride-hailing market has erupted into a brawl between Uber and Beijing startup Didi Kuaidi.

Foreign Firms Feel China’s Chill

Market turmoil and Beijing’s crackdown on brokers and investors is complicating the plans of foreign funds and investment banks that had bet on bigger business in China.

Devaluation Strengthens China’s Hand at IMF

Beijing’s careful management of its currency since its devaluation last month is bolstering China’s bid to get the yuan included in the IMF’s basket of reserve currencies as soon as November.

Rio Tinto Sees Solid Demand for Steel

Rio Tinto told investors it expects world-wide demand for iron ore to keep growing despite China’s economic slowdown, as the company projected a rising appetite for steel.

Private-Equity Firms Explore Bids for Petco

Private-equity firms are examining a possible purchase of Petco Holdings, the pet-store chain that filed to go public last month.

Barclays Sells Portuguese Retail-Banking Business

Barclays PLC has sold its Portuguese retail banking business to Spain’s Bankinter SA, as the British bank scales back its presence in less profitable markets.

Syngenta Moves to Calm Disappointed Shareholders

Syngenta moved to appease shareholders angered by its rejection of a takeover from Monsanto, saying it will divest its global vegetables seeds business and return more than $2 billion to shareholders.

Vivendi Earnings Rise

Vivendi SA on Wednesday reported a rise in second-quarter net profit, boosted by a windfall from the sale of its Brazilian telecom unit GVT to Telefónica SA.

Small Firms Slow to Embrace Chip-Card System

Many small businesses aren’t racing to update their checkout systems ahead of an Oct. 1 shift that will put merchants on the hook for some fraudulent card charges.

Natalie Massenet Leaves Net-a-Porter

The founder and executive chairman of Net-a-Porter has abruptly resigned, leaving the high-end fashion site ahead of its pending merger with Yoox.

World Tree Count Climbs

There are slightly more than three trillion trees in the world, a figure that dwarfs previous estimates, according to the most comprehensive census yet of global forestation. 172

Gas Discovery in Egypt Troubles Israel

Israeli officials have expressed concern that the discovery of an extensive gas field off the coast of Egypt could upend Israeli development of its energy resources.

Masked Gunmen Kidnap 18 Turkish Workers in Baghdad

Identities of the gunmen in an early-morning raid on a sports stadium weren’t immediately known, as Turks in Iraq were seized for a second time in the past year.

At Least 22 Killed in Suicide Bombings at Mosque in Yemen

A pair of suicide bombings killed a least 22 people Wednesday at a mosque in San’a, just hours after a gunman killed two Red Cross workers.

Obama Locks in Votes to Secure Iran Nuclear Deal

President Barack Obama locked in enough support in Congress to ensure he can overcome bipartisan opposition and implement a landmark nuclear accord with Iran. 1817

Solitary Confinement Poses ‘Grave Problem,’ Study Says

Prisons are holding as many as 100,000 inmates in solitary confinement, a striking figure that poses a “grave problem” for the criminal justice system, according to a study. 56

Emails Point to Large Role for Clinton Adviser Blumenthal

Longtime aide Sidney Blumenthal maintained an outsize role with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, despite being blocked from taking a job at the department. 189

Court Weighs Request to Immediately Stop Phone-Data Collection

An appeals court panel is considering whether to allow the government to continue the bulk collection of phone records during a six-month transition period until a new law kicks in prohibiting the controversial program.

Biden’s Florida Trip Draws Campaign-Level Attention

Vice President Joe Biden received full-court national attention for an otherwise routine visit to Miami Dade College, with dozens of television cameras, photographers and reporters there to cover his 30 minutes of remarks.

Video

Hungarian Police Struggle to Control Migrants

2:02

The Iran Nuclear Deal Explained

3:34

Uber Class-Action Lawsuit: What's at Stake

2:39