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Migrants Pour Into Austria After Trek

Thousands of migrants poured into Austria and Germany on Saturday, as escalating tensions in Hungary forced the two countries to open their borders to one of the largest waves of people since World War II. 83

G-20 Countries Vow to Refrain From Currency Depreciation

The world’s largest economies, including China, will renew their commitment to avoid depreciating their currencies to gain a competitive trading advantage, a senior U.S. Treasury official said.

Google Pursuing a Return to China

Google is in talks with the Chinese government and handset makers about launching a new Android app store there, a move that would mark the company’s return to China.

U.S. Veterans Who Fight ISIS

A former Army Ranger and a decorated Marine are among U.S. veterans volunteering to join Kurdish fighters against Islamic State in Syria. 85

From Piles of Trash Sprout Demands for Change in Lebanon

Protests demanding political reform bridge country’s longtime political, religious and ethnic divides.

Blurry Job Picture Poses Test for Fed

U.S. employment growth slowed in August but the jobless rate fell to the lowest level since 2008, a mixed labor-market reading less than two weeks before a crucial Federal Reserve meeting. 248

Judge Orders Credit Suisse to Pay Highland $287.5 Million Over Loan

A judge said Credit Suisse must pay a unit of Highland Capital Management $287.5 million over a soured real-estate loan, a win for James Dondero’s hedge-fund firm in its multipronged fight against the Swiss bank over luxury developments.

Houthi Rebels Kill 60 Coalition Soldiers in Yemen

Yemen’s Iran-backed Houthi rebels were behind a rocket attack that killed 60 soldiers from a coalition led by Saudi Arabia, as the country increased airstrikes against the militants in retaliation.

Clashes in Tajikistan Leave 22 Dead

An outbreak of violence in Tajikistan left at least 22 people dead on Friday, raising fears of a return to unrest in a Central Asian nation still scarred by civil war.

London Jewel Thieves Plead Guilty in Easter Heist

Four men pleaded guilty on Friday to conspiracy for a jewel heist in London’s Hatton Garden diamond district over the Easter weekend.

Putin Pitches for Foreign Investment in Russia’s Far East

Russian President Vladimir Putin has made a pitch for greater investment in his country’s resource-rich Far East region, despite a slowdown in the Chinese economy that has shaken global markets.

Startups Dash Into Hot Data-Storage Sector

One of Silicon Valley’s least-sexy sectors has turned into one of its hottest. Technology for helping companies store data has become crucial to speeding operations and making companies nimbler.

Daimler, Renault Reboot Tiny Car

Daimler is taking another crack at the U.S. market for ultra-compacts with a retooled version of its ForTwo Smart car built through a collaboration that could become a benchmark for other auto makers. 72

Restyled Vans Find a Bigger Market

Newer work vans that drive like cars, get decent gas mileage and are easily customized to haul people, packages or cargo are making the lowly panel van fun—and a big seller again.

Brussels Beat

EU Displaces U.S. as Top Antitrust Cop

The European Union’s antitrust activism has put it in prime position to shape the Internet and is encouraging some U.S. technology executives to focus on Brussels.

Theater

Michael Grandage: A Director’s DNA

With ‘Photograph 51’ at London’s Noël Coward Theatre, the acclaimed director coaxes Nicole Kidman back onstage for an exploration of the passion and poetry of science.

WSJ. Magazine

Robert Redford: From Sundance Kid to Hollywood Legend

The legendary actor is as busy as ever, with starring roles in the film adaptation of Bill Bryson’s “A Walk in the Woods” and in the forthcoming drama, “Truth.” 59

Fashion

How Fashion Experts Shop the High Street

Despite the crowds, the lines and the overpacked rails, there are real gems to be found in mainstream stores—you just need to know how to find them.

Will Lyons on Wine

What’s the Point of Scoring Wines?

A wine’s taste and character change almost daily, and taste is subjective—so is giving them marks a pointless exercise?

U.S.

The Saturday Essay

The Racial Reality of Policing

Police bias and misconduct are serious problems—but so is the epidemic of homicide among young black men. 480

Markets

U.S. Prosecutors Cite ‘Spoofing’ Software Allegedly Used by U.K. Trader

U.K. trader Navinder Sarao, who faces a U.S. extradition hearing later this month, allegedly worked with a customized version of software known as the “matrix” in a deliberate attempt to “spoof” markets, according to a U.S. court filing.

U.K. Regulator Warns Commodity Firms About Market Abuse

The U.K.’s financial regulator said firms that trade commodities have learned little from recent high-profile cases of market abuse and are failing to adequately monitor the risks of such abuse.

Video

Migrants Vow to March From Hungary to Austria

1:24

Migrants Refuse to Go to Refugee Camp in Hungary

1:59

Father of Aylan Kurdi Speaks at Funeral

0:58

Mind and Matter

The Power of Brains to Keep Growing

Not long ago, scientists thought that after infancy, our brains never added any neurons. Patricia Churchland on how brains keep growing

Film Review

‘La Jaula de Oro (The Golden Dream)’ Review: Dark Immigrant Odyssey

In Diego Quemada-Diez’s celebrated directorial debut, a trio of teenagers flee from Guatemala and make their way through a treacherous Mexico, where police and gangsters prey on vulnerable travelers.

WSJ Blogs

Real-time commentary and analysis from The Wall Street Journal
WSJ Tech
Wie das Netz die Wirtschaft verändert

Nokia kann noch billiger


Während solche Geräte Nokia einst zum Handykönig aufstiegen ließen, bekommt die Krone zunehmend Kratzer, da Kunden in Schwellenländern zunehmend zu günstigen Android-Smartphones greifen, die für rund 100 Dollar zu haben sind.

BARCELONA – Nokia-Chef Stephen Elop hat den bislang deutlichsten Hinweis darauf gegeben, dass der finnische Konzern an billigeren Windows-Phone-Geräten arbeitet, deren  Preis noch unter dem des gerade vorgestellten Lumia 520 liegen wird.

Auch wenn Elop sich zu dem Thema nicht explizit äußern wollte, dementierte er nicht, dass das am Montag vorgestellten Lumia 520 für 139 Euro nicht das günstigste Windows-Smartphone von Nokia bleiben wird. Gefragt nach anderen Low-End-Geräten sagte Elop lediglich: „Es gibt 2013 noch viel Spannendes.“

Elop präsentierte auf dem Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona vier neue Geräte – zwei davon im Low-End-Bereich und zwei Lumia-Smartphones – das Einsteigermodell 620 und das Mittelklassenmodell 720.

Die Billig-Telefone erzielten dabei die meiste Aufmerksamkeit, insbesondere die Präsentation eines 15-Euro-Telefons. Das neue Handy ersetzt das Nokia 1280, das mehr als 100 Millionen Mal verkauft wurde.

Als Nokia im Oktober 2011 die ersten Lumia-Geräte auf den Markt brachte, brachten die Finnen zeitgleich eine Reihe günstiger Handys unter dem Namen Asha heraus, die auf Schwellenländer zielten. Die Handys können Ähnliches wie Smartphones, halten aber bei der Leistung nicht mit. Nokia-Chef Elop führte auf der Mobil-Messe in Barcelona aus, dass es für Anwender leichter werden soll, von Asha-Geräten auf die echten Smartphones der Lumia-Reihe mit Microsofts Betriebssystem Windows Phone 8 umzusteigen.

Nokia behauptet, dass es der Druck des Handyherstellers gewesen sei, der Microsoft davon überzeugt hat, die Anforderungen von Windows Phone zu senken. Die niedrigeren Hardware-Spezifikationen erlaubten Nokia, das System auch in den traditionellen Märkten des Konzerns zu nutzen.

Laut Elop gab es keinen Strategiewechsel von Nokia. Die Einführung von günstigeren Geräten sei auch keine Reaktion auf schlechte Verkaufszahlen der Lumia-Geräte. Dem Nokia-Chef zufolge wurden bisher 14 bis 15 Millionen Geräte der Reihe verkauft.

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Über WSJ Tech

  • Apps, Crowdfunding, Cloud Computing – neue Technologien werfen die Regeln der Weltwirtschaft um. WSJ Tech erklärt technologische Trends, stellt interessante Entwicklungen vor und analysiert die wichtigsten Trends der IT-Wirtschaft.

    Die Autoren:

    Stephan DörnerStephan Dörner
    Jörgen CamrathJörgen Camrath
The Wall Street Journal & Breaking News, Business, Financial and Economic News, World News and Video
Search
IMAGE 1 of 14

Migrants Pour Into Austria After Trek

Thousands of migrants poured into Austria and Germany on Saturday, as escalating tensions in Hungary forced the two countries to open their borders to one of the largest waves of people since World War II. 83

G-20 Countries Vow to Refrain From Currency Depreciation

The world’s largest economies, including China, will renew their commitment to avoid depreciating their currencies to gain a competitive trading advantage, a senior U.S. Treasury official said.

Google Pursuing a Return to China

Google is in talks with the Chinese government and handset makers about launching a new Android app store there, a move that would mark the company’s return to China.

U.S. Veterans Who Fight ISIS

A former Army Ranger and a decorated Marine are among U.S. veterans volunteering to join Kurdish fighters against Islamic State in Syria. 85

From Piles of Trash Sprout Demands for Change in Lebanon

Protests demanding political reform bridge country’s longtime political, religious and ethnic divides.

Blurry Job Picture Poses Test for Fed

U.S. employment growth slowed in August but the jobless rate fell to the lowest level since 2008, a mixed labor-market reading less than two weeks before a crucial Federal Reserve meeting. 248

Judge Orders Credit Suisse to Pay Highland $287.5 Million Over Loan

A judge said Credit Suisse must pay a unit of Highland Capital Management $287.5 million over a soured real-estate loan, a win for James Dondero’s hedge-fund firm in its multipronged fight against the Swiss bank over luxury developments.

Houthi Rebels Kill 60 Coalition Soldiers in Yemen

Yemen’s Iran-backed Houthi rebels were behind a rocket attack that killed 60 soldiers from a coalition led by Saudi Arabia, as the country increased airstrikes against the militants in retaliation.

Clashes in Tajikistan Leave 22 Dead

An outbreak of violence in Tajikistan left at least 22 people dead on Friday, raising fears of a return to unrest in a Central Asian nation still scarred by civil war.

London Jewel Thieves Plead Guilty in Easter Heist

Four men pleaded guilty on Friday to conspiracy for a jewel heist in London’s Hatton Garden diamond district over the Easter weekend.

Putin Pitches for Foreign Investment in Russia’s Far East

Russian President Vladimir Putin has made a pitch for greater investment in his country’s resource-rich Far East region, despite a slowdown in the Chinese economy that has shaken global markets.